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Hearing instrument orientation for children and their families

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Hearing instrument orientation for children and their families

  1. 1. Hearing InstrumentOrientation for Children and Their Families Chapter 29 by Tharpe & Ryan
  2. 2. Family Counseling and EducationFamily Education Sjoblad et al., 2001Often 2 to 3 weekdelay between Dxand HA fitting butmay be delayedgreater than 4weeks
  3. 3. Family Counseling and EducationDuring this delay, parental experiences may beeither positive or negativeNegative -- self-doubt, anxietyPositive -- gaining knowledgeRobbins (2002) -- recommendations foraudiologists to give to parents (re: parent-childinteraction) for time period following Dx prior toenrollment in intervention program
  4. 4. Family Counseling and Education Phase I -- From time of diagnosis to hearing aid fitting● Continue to talk to your child -- Play gesture games, sing songs, be animated● Begin a journal of your experience● Contact the John Tracy Clinic -- they provide correspondence for families in more than 20 languages Phase II-- Early weeks just following the hearing aid fitting● Keep a weekly hearing aid calendar● Refer to your child by name -- always have a purpose for calling your child● Use a hand-to-ear response when a sound is heard● Tell your interventionists of changes in vocalizations as well as auditory responses Phase III -- After the initial adjustment to hearing aids until formal intervention● Imitate your childs vocalizations, using intonation, patterns and sound● Encourage an anticipatory response to sound--make clear to your child that you expect a response and wait for that response● Select three common sounds in your home for your child to learn
  5. 5. Family Counseling and EducationHearing Aid Orientation Many parents will not remember all theinformation to you present to them (Eiser et al.,1994; Reese et al., 2005)What to do?printed handoutsreiterate the same information at follow-upinvite clients extended family to orientation
  6. 6. Family Counseling and EducationFundamental Points for Parents
  7. 7. Family Counseling and EducationCare and Maintenancecleaning - no alcohol, mold in warm waterstorage - case with desiccant or drying unitlistening check by parent
  8. 8. Family Counseling and EducationSafety Features and IssuesOveramplification - verification, deactivate VCBattery IngestionEar Placement - left vs right
  9. 9. Family Counseling and EducationRealistic ExpectationsEffects of Background NoiseAcoustic FeedbackCommunication StrategiesEnvironmental Awareness
  10. 10. The Physical FitEarmolds - retain aids in the ear and house theacoustic pathway from receiver to sound outletStyleMaterialVentingTubing
  11. 11. RetentionBehavioral Retention: Establishing the RoutinePhysical Retention and Protection
  12. 12. Family Counseling and Education Phase I -- From time of diagnosis to hearing aid fitting● Continue to talk to your child -- Play gesture games, sing songs, be animated● Begin a journal of your experience● Contact the John Tracy Clinic -- they provide correspondence for families in more than 20 languages Phase II-- Early weeks just following the hearing aid fitting● Keep a weekly hearing aid calendar● Refer to your child by name -- always have a purpose for calling your child● Use a hand-to-ear response when a sound is heard● Tell your interventionists of changes in vocalizations as well as auditory responses Phase III -- After the initial adjustment to hearing aids until formal intervention● Imitate your childs vocalizations, using intonation, patterns and sound● Encourage an anticipatory response to sound--make clear to your child that you expect a response and wait for that response● Select three common sounds in your home for your child to learn
  13. 13. Follow-Up and MonitoringHow Often for Follow-UpEvery 3 mos. for first through age 2 yearsEvery 4 to 6 mos. for children 3 years and olderHearing aid check - listening check andelectroacoustic analysis
  14. 14. Follow-Up and MonitoringNew Moldsnew molds ~ 2 to 4xyear depending onacoustic fitReal-ear verificationfollowing the fitting of new moldsHearing evaluations - annually
  15. 15. Child EducationAs the child gets older, interaction with aidsincreasesInsertion/removal of aids and batteriesCleaning/storing aidsUse of volume control and/or program buttonIncreasing knowledge of hearing loss/ aids
  16. 16. ReferencesEiser, C., Parkyn, T., Havermans, T., and McNinch, A. (1994). “Parents’ recall on the diagnosis of cancer in their child,” Psycho-Oncology 3, 197-203.Ingrao, B. (1999). “MORE THAN MEETS THE EAR : UNDERSTANDING AND OPTIMIZING YOUR CHILD’S EARMOLDS,” Volta Voices 26-29.Reese, J. L., and Hnath-Chisolm, T. (2005). “Recognition of hearing aid orientation content by first- time users,” American journal of audiology 14, 94-104.Robbins, A. M. (2002). Empowering parents to help their newly diagnosed child gain communication skills. The Hearing Journal, 55(11), 55-56, 59. Retrieved from http://journals.lww. com/thehearingjournal/Abstract/2002/11000/Empowering_parents_to_help_their_newly_diagnose d.10.aspxSjoblad, S., Harrison, M., Roush, J., and McWilliam, R. A. (2001). “Parents’ reactions and recommendations after diagnosis and hearing aid fitting,” American journal of audiology 10, 24-31.

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