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EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC
MINISTRY OF SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, LIVESTOCK AND FOOD SUPPLY
MINISTRY OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, INNOVATION AND COMMUNICATIONS
MINISTRY OF CULTURE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
MINISTRY OF FINANCES
MINISTRY OF NATIONAL INTEGRATION
MINISTRY OF JUSTICE AND PUBLIC SECURITIY
MINISTRY OF HEALTH
MINISTRY OF CITIES
MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
MINISTRY OF PLANNING, DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT
MINISTRY OF LABOUR
MINISTRY OF HUMAN RIGHTS
GOVERNMENT SECRETARIAT – OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC
SPECIAL SECRETARIAT FOR FAMILY FARMING AND AGRARIAN DEVELOPMENT
NATIONAL SECRETARIAT FOR RACIAL EQUALITY PROMOTION POLICIES
NATIONAL SECRETARIAT FOR WOMEN’S POLICIES
4 | | 5
Foreword
The Decade of Action on Nutrition is a strategy that has come at an appropri-
ate time. Despite the significant progress that many countries have made in recent
years, globally progress has been unequal and modest with regard to eradicating all
forms of malnutrition. Achieving complex goals such as ending hunger and malnu-
trition, as well as ensuring universal access by the world’s population to healthier
and sustainable diets, will only be possible through governance that promotes con-
vergence on the agenda by all sectors.
The Decade, together with other global strategies such as the 2030 Agenda for
Sustainable Development, has the potential to strengthen the approach whereby
all forms of malnutrition should be treated in an articulated manner and all coun-
tries are affected by and responsible for the global situation; as well as the poten-
tial to encourage the alignment of domestic and foreign policies in the different
sectors involved in addressing all forms of malnutrition; favour the overcoming of
the traditional division between donor and recipient countries; articulate different
sectors, programmes, actions and subjects; foster the vision of multidetermination
and the dimensions of nourishment and its expressions; create conditions for po-
litical and budgetary commitments to be established in order to achieve food and
nutrition goals; and establish a monitoring and accountability system.
It is important to highlight that the implementation of the agenda envisaged
for the Decade will directly impact the achievement of the Sustainable Develop-
ment Goals (SDG) by the different countries, given that as well as there being Goals
directly related to nutrition and to food and nutrition security, indirect relationships
can be identified between the Decade’s commitments and practically all the SDGs.
Brazil is engaging in this global movement based on the understanding that
malnutrition, in all its forms – including undernourishment, micronutrient deficien-
cies, overweight and obesity – affects not only people’s health and well-being, but
also generates devastating social and economic consequences for families, com-
munities and States; and that its determination is related to multiple causes, as
well as to the prevailing food system.
Caio Rocha
Executive Secretariat
National Interministerial Food and Nutrition Security Chamber
The world’s populations still suffer from multiple forms of malnutrition. Six
of the eleven major disease burden risk factors are related to nourishment. Be-
sides affecting people’s health and well-being, the various forms of malnutri-
tion result in a high disease burden with social and economic consequences for
health systems, communities and families in the different countries.
With the aim of ending poverty, promoting prosperity and the well-being
of all people, in addition to protecting the environment in a context of climate
changes, in 2015 the United Nations endorsed the Sustainable Development
Goals (SDG), opening a new era of international cooperation and national efforts
to achieve the 2030 Agenda. Twelve of the seventeen SDGs require good nutrition
status in order to be achieved. Reaffirming the 2030 Agenda commitments and
setting nutrition as a priority, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed
the Decade of Action on Nutrition (2016-2025). The aim is to coordinate efforts
with effective participation of the countries in order to address all forms of mal-
nutrition.
Pan American Health Organization/ World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO)
Brazil compliments the Brazilian Government on the declaration of its 38 SMART
commitments for the Decade of Action on Nutrition presented in this publication.
PAHO/WHO Brazil is also at the disposal of national Brazilian authorities to con-
tinue with and strengthen its technical cooperation with the aim of accelerating
the process of addressing all forms of malnutrition from a perspective of the food
system. The Decade of Action on Nutrition is a great opportunity for improved
coordination between diverse stakeholders and partners, from different sectors,
in order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.
Joaquín Molina
PAHO/WHO Brazil Country Representative
6 | | 7
One of the commitments under the United Nations Decade of Action on Nu-
trition (2016-2025) was fulfilled when, in 2014, Brazil surpassed expectations and
was taken off the UN Hunger Map. Nevertheless, despite the significant progress
made, the country still faces a large number of problems relating to malnutrition.
Whilst Brazil has managed to overcome hunger, on the other hand over-
weight and obesity rates have increased considerably in recent years among both
adults and children. This situation generates important impacts on health and
needs to be a priority on family and government agendas.
As such the Decade of Action on Nutrition initiative framework is a major
opportunity for significantly reducing malnutrition indicators, through initiatives
such as the Criança Feliz programme, which seeks to achieve integral develop-
ment in early childhood.
It is therefore crucial at this time that we advance even more with the imple-
mentation of public policies to combat hunger and malnutrition globally.
The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) congratulates
the Brazilian Government on its declaration of international commitment to the
United Nations Decade of Action on Nutrition, reaffirming its dedication to ensur-
ing that such commitments become concrete policies and programmes, such as
the promotion of sustainable and resilient food systems, capable of resulting in
improved nutrition by 2025.
Alan Bojanic
FAO Representative in Brazil
The Brazilian context
The Brazilian Nutrition and Food Systems Agenda is based on the principles
of ensuring Food and Nutrition Security and the realization of the Human Right to
Adequate Food (HRAF), this being a right that has been laid down in the Brazilian
Constitution since the year 2010. Brazil has established Food and Nutrition Security
governance as a State agenda, involving Laws, Decrees, budget and a defined mon-
itoring system (Law No. 11346/2006 and Decree No. 7272/2010).
In Brazil, Food and Nutrition Security (FNS) governance is made operational
through a National Food and Nutrition Security System (SISAN). The System rep-
resents the Brazilian conception of FNS1
, reinforces intersectorality; the federative
relationship between the Union, States and Municipalities and social participation.
Its purpose is to ensure that all people living within the national territory are free
from hunger, in addition to ensuring the right to real food – this being a multidi-
mensional concept established at the 5th
National Conference on Food and Nutri-
tion Security, held in November 20152
.
The System led to the formulation of the National Food and Nutrition Security
Policy (PNSAN) in 2010. The Policy is made operational through 4-year Plans con-
taining guidelines, targets, resources and monitoring and evaluation instruments,
involving different sectors of government and society, in the quest for adequate
and healthy food for everyone. The System includes an Interministerial Food and
Nutrition Security Chamber (CAISAN) comprised of 20 Ministries and Special Sec-
retariats, in line with the System’s intersectoral dimension, as well as a National
Food and Nutrition Security Council (CONSEA), comprised of 2/3 civil society and
1/3 government membership, in keeping with the principle of social participation.
The 1st National Food and Nutrition Security Plan (PLANSAN 2012-2015) en-
abled Brazil to be taken off the Hunger Map in 2014. The 2nd National Food and
Nutrition Security Plan (PLANSAN 2016-2019) is currently in force and is the fruit
of a process of intersectoral and participatory discussion. It brings together in an
organized manner a set of policies, programmes and actions, having 121 targets,
involving actions by 14 Ministries and an annual estimated budget of almost BRL
1	 Law No. 11346/2006 defines Food and Nutrition Security as the fulfilment of everyone’s right to regular
and permanent access to sufficient quantities of quality food, without compromising access to other essential
needs, based on food and eating practices that promote health, respect cultural diversity and are environmentally,
culturally, economically and socially sustainable.
2	 The National FNS Conference is held every 4 years and is the body responsible for indicating FNS Na-
tional Policy and Plan guidelines and priorities to the National Food and Nutrition Security Council, as well as being
responsible for SISAN monitoring. The Conference is the high point of social dialogue aimed at enhancing the
Policy and the Plan. Its primary mission it to look ahead, reflect and present new proposals. The 5th Conference
took place in November 2015, having as its theme “Real Food in the country and the city: more rights and food
sovereignty”. The Manifesto of the 5th Conference is attached to this document.
8 | | 9
100 billion.
It is within this context that Brazil presents its commitments to the Decade
of Action on Nutrition, emphasizing that these commitments, aligned with the Na-
tional FNS Plan targets, aim to contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable
Development Goals. It is our understanding that the agendas of the Decade and the
SDG agendas are related and that the articulation of intersectoral and participatory
responses with the issues presented forms part of the broader context of the im-
plementation of the 2030 Agenda.
Brazil’s commitments within the Decade of Action on Nutrition
As part of the Decade, the 60 Recommendations of the 2nd International Con-
ference on Nutrition (ICN2) Framework for Action have been divided among six pil-
lars. These pillars dialogue to a great extent with the 9 Challenges proposed by the
2nd
National Food and Nutrition Security Plan (PLANSAN 2016-2019).
As such, Brazil presents its commitments – in the SMART format (Specific, Mea-
surable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-bound) – to the Decade of Action on Nutri-
tion in a manner which is aligned with the targets already set in its National FNS
Plan. It should be noted that in virtue of the 2nd PLANSAN currently being in force,
the commitments presented here are to be achieved by 2019.
»» Pillar 1 – Sustainable, resilient food systems for healthy diets
The first Pillar of the Decade highlights the causal relationship between sus-
tainable food systems and healthy eating. It reinforces the importance of invest-
ment and public policies that integrate nutrition, food and agriculture policies,
strengthening local food production and processing, especially by family farmers.
Many of the targets contained in Challenge 3 of the 2nd PLANSAN2016-2019:
Promoting the production of healthy and sustainable food, the structuring of fam-
ily farming and the strengthening of agroecology-based production systems are
in response to the ICN2 Recommendations relating to Pillar 1. This Pillar also dia-
logues directly with PLANSAN 2 Challenge 4: Promoting the supply and regular and
permanent access by the Brazilian population to adequate and healthy food. These
Challenges are anchored in the premise that healthy and sustainable food systems
are those that conceive of a sustainable model right from food production, the
commercialization and supply stages, through to its consumption.
Brazil’s commitments to promoting production of and access to healthy and
sustainable food and to structuring family farming:
1
Provide targeted and continuous technical assistance and qualified rural
extension to 1 million family farming families, including technical assis-
tance and rural extension for rural youth and traditional peoples and
communities, ensuring that 50% of people assisted are women and that
30% of the budget is allocated to specific activities of women.
2
Provide the means to enable 1.8 million microcredit operations, guided
and accompanied by the National Family Farming Strengthening Pro-
gramme (PRONAF).
3
Enable 1.35 million family farming families to adhere to Harvest Insur-
ance, whereby preferably adherence to insurance is done in the name of
rural women.
4
Provide 390,000 family farmers with Family Farming Insurance, prioritizing
the development of new coverage models for family farming segments
without coverage.
5
Encourage 1 million men and women family farmers, agrarian reform set-
tlers and traditional peoples and communities, including rural youth, to
use production systems that are agroecology-based, organic or in agro-
ecological transition.
6
Establish and monitor the National Socio-biodiversity Programme, in ar-
ticulation with the Interministerial Agroecology and Organic Production
Chamber and with the National Agroecology and Organic Production
Commission.
7
Provide the means for rural women to undertake at least 35% of microcre-
dit operations carried out and 20% of the total volume of credit accessed
via PRONAF.
8
Assist 1,500 groups of rural women food producers with integrated tech-
nical assistance and rural extension, credit, commercialization and man-
agement actions, strengthening agroecological production.
9
Assist 80,000 family farming youths, ensuring the participation of youth
from traditional peoples and community sectors, with specific technical
assistance and rural extension for rural youth.
10
Enable rural youth to access at least 20% of National Family Farming
Strengthening Programme credit operations, ensuring the participation
of youth from traditional peoples and community segments.
11
Promote access to and production of varietal and native seeds and seed-
lings, via the National Family Farming Seeds and Seedlings Programme.
12 Scale up public purchases of Family Farming produce to R$ 2.5 billion.
10 | | 11
13
Promote an annual increase of 2.5% in financial resources transferred by
the National School Feeding Programme allocated to purchasing food-
stuffs produced by Family Farming.
14 Establish a legal framework for reducing food loss and wastage.
15
Support the structuring of Public Food and Nutrition Security Facilities to
receive healthy food, including food produced by Family Farming.
»» Pillar 2 - Aligned health systems providing universal cover-
age of essential nutrition actions
The second Pillar highlights the importance of health systems effectively incor-
porating nutrition actions, promoting universal access by the population to health
programmes and actions that have impact on nutritional aspects. This Pillar also
supports the implementation of health targets and strategies related to this theme,
such as the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Global Strategy for Infant and Young
Child Feeding and the WHO Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of
Noncommunicable Diseases (2013-2020).
In the case of the 2nd PLANSAN, it is Challenge 5: Promote and protect Adequate
and Healthy Eating for the Brazilian Population, through food and nutrition edu-
cation strategies and regulatory measures and Challenge 6: Control and prevent
adverse health conditions arising from poor nourishment which address aspects
related to this theme. Inadequate food and overweight are risk factors for Chron-
ic Noncommunicable Diseases (CNCD) such as hypertension, diabetes and cancer.
Addressing this situation demands joint action by the different government levels,
through intersectoral actions and social participation.
Brazil’s commitments to promoting and protecting Adequate and Healthy
Eating and to controlling and preventing adverse health conditions arising from
poor nourishment:
16
Reduce regular consumption of soft drinks and artificial fruit juices by at
least 30% in the adult population (current rate is 16.5%).
17
Increase by at least 17.8% the percentage of adults who regularly con-
sume fruit and vegetables (current rate is 35.2%).
18 Stem the growth of obesity in the adult population (current rate is 20.8%).
19 Implement the Intersectoral Strategy on Obesity Prevention and Control.
20
Agree and monitor targets for reducing sodium in processed foods in Bra-
zil.
21
Make an agreement to reduce sugar in priority category products, based
on ample discussion with society.
»» Pillar 3 - Social protection and nutrition education
The third Pillar highlights the importance of incorporating the nutrition agen-
da into social protection and humanitarian aid programmes, as well as implement-
ing nutrition information and education actions such as, for example, interventions
based on national food guides. This Pillar also includes policies on income transfer,
food donation and school feeding programmes.
PLANSAN Challenge 1: Promote universal access to adequate and healthy food,
prioritizing families and people in situations of food and nutrition insecurity, ad-
dresses the issue of linking food and nutrition security to social protection. In par-
allel, Challenge 2 - Combat food and nutrition insecurity and promote productive
rural inclusion among specific population groups, with emphasis on Traditional
Peoples and Communities and other vulnerable social groups in rural areas, ad-
dresses hunger among specific population groups.
Although hunger is no longer considered to be a structural problem in Brazil,
food and nutrition insecurity still persists among some population groups. As such,
building and executing differentiated and specific policies, based on the princi-
ples of ethnodevelopment, which respect the cultures, forms of social organization,
ethnic and racial specificities and gender issues, is the path to be taken. The need
exists to ensure the continuity and enhancement of policies that scale up access to
food by groups most vulnerable to hunger, so as to overcome malnutrition among
these groups as well. In turn, Challenge 5 mentioned above emphasizes the im-
portance of food and nutrition education strategies in promoting Adequate and
Healthy Eating.
Brazil’s commitments to promoting universal access to adequate and healthy
food, prioritizing families and people facing food and nutrition insecurity, tradi-
tional peoples and communities and other vulnerable social groups:
22
Transfer income to families in situations of poverty who meet the eligi-
bility criteria, in accordance with the Bolsa Família (Family Grant) Pro-
gramme service estimates.
23
Supply school meals to 40 million state school children, per annum, in-
cluding 230,000 indigenous students and 230,000 quilombola students.
12 | | 13
24
Implement the new Food Distribution Action legal framework, in accor-
dance with the Human Right to Adequate Food, respecting food habits
and cultures, with emphasis on more vulnerable territories, as indicated
by the study entitled Food and Nutrition Insecurity Mapping, conducted
by the Interministerial Food and Nutrition Security Chamber (CAISAN).
25
Reduce by 25% underweight-for-age among indigenous children below
5 years of age accompanied under the health conditions of the Bolsa
Família Programme, by means of articulated actions within the scope of
the Interministerial Food and Nutrition Security Chamber (CAISAN), prior-
itizing socio-biodiversity-related production and dietary practices.
26
Reduce by 20% underweight-for-age among quilombola children below
5 years of age accompanied under the health conditions of the Bolsa
Família Programme, by means of articulated actions within the scope of
the Interministerial Food and Nutrition Security Chamber (CAISAN), prior-
itizing socio-biodiversity-related production and dietary practices.
27
Identify groups and territories most vulnerable in terms of food and nu-
trition security, by means of the study entitled Food and Nutrition In-
security Mapping, conducted by the Interministerial Food and Nutrition
Security Chamber (CAISAN), with the aim of informing coordinated and
federative Food and Nutrition Security actions.
28
Implement the recommendations of the Food Guide for the Brazilian Pop-
ulation for children aged under two years old, emphasizing the consump-
tion of regional food and sustainable production practices that respect
biodiversity.
»» Pillar 4 - Trade and investment for improved nutrition
In recognition of the relevance of trade and investment in food systems, food
and food and nutrition security, this Pillar focuses on encouraging governments,
United Nations agencies, programmes and funds, the World Trade Organization
(WTO) and other international organizations to identify opportunities for achieving
global food and nutrition targets through trade and investment policies. It also
focuses on improving food availability and supply through trade agreements and
policies, including fiscal instruments such as taxation, subsidies and incentives in
terms of supply. ICN2 Recommendation 4, linked to this Pillar, stresses the impor-
tance of scaling up sustainable and responsible investments in nutrition, especially
national level domestic investments; generating additional resources through inno-
vative funding instruments; adherence of development partners to scale up Official
Development Assistance with nutrition and the adoption of private investments,
when appropriate.	
»» Pillar 5 - Safe and supportive environments for nutrition at
all ages
Pillar 5 places emphasis on the importance of environmental determinants in
the occurrence of all forms of malnutrition. This includes diverse types of environ-
ment, such as domestic environments, school environments, work and institutional
environments, such as hospitals. This Pillar focuses on ICN2 Plan of Action Recom-
mendations 1-7, as well as on actions for access to water and sanitation and actions
to promote, protect and support breastfeeding.
By recognizing the importance of access to quality water for nutrition, PLAN-
SAN 2 puts forward a specific challenge for dealing with the issue, namely Challenge
7 - Scale up water availability and the population’s access to water, in particu-
lar poor people in rural areas. Targets relating to promoting breastfeeding, as well
as promoting healthy diets in education and health environments, are covered by
Challenge 5 as mentioned earlier.
Brazil’s commitments to scaling up water availability and promoting healthy
diets in diverse environments and at all stages of life:
29
Implant the National Strategy to Promote Breastfeeding and Complemen-
tary Feeding on the Unified Health System in more than 2,000 primary
health centres.
30
Include Food and Nutrition Education information on the 4th cover of the
text books of 120,000 elementary education schools.
31
Regulate commercialization, advertising, publicity and commercial pro-
motion of processed and ultra-processed food and drink in public and
private health and education systems, social services facilities and public
bodies.
32
Implant plate cisterns and other social technologies for accessing water
for human consumption, preferably or primarily for households headed
by women.
33 Implant 8,000 cisterns in schools.
34
Implant 120,000 social technologies for access to water for production,
preferably or primarily for households headed by women.
14 | | 15
»» Pillar 6 – Review, strengthen and promote nutrition gover-
nance and accountability
The final Pillar of the Decade of Action on Nutrition includes permanent moni-
toring of the achievement of global targets for food and nutrition and CNCD control
and prevention; creation of policies and legislation and programme implementa-
tion. The Recommendations linked to this Pillar place priority on two aspects. The
first aspect addresses nutrition governance: the importance of developing nation-
al nutrition plans, aligning intersectoral policies with impact on nutrition through
different ministries and agencies and the strengthening of legal frameworks and
strategic potentialities for nutrition. The second aspect relates to collaboration be-
tween countries, such as North-North, South-South and triangular cooperation, as
well as sharing information on nutrition, diet, technology, research, policies and
programmes.
In PLANSAN 2, each of these aspects is found in a Challenge. Governance-re-
lated strategies are provided for in Challenge 8 - Consolidate the implementation
of the National Food and Nutrition Security System (SISAN), enhancing federative
management, intersectorality and social participation. In addition to strengthening
the components of the System, Challenge 8 has targets and actions relating to FNS
research and extension, developing abilities for the Human Right to Adequate Food
(HRAF), building instruments for HRAF demandability and the enhancement of the
PNSAN monitoring and indicators system.
The aspect relating to the importance of collaboration between countries, em-
phasized by Pillar 6, is found in PLANSAN 2 Challenge 9 - Support initiatives pro-
moting food and nutrition sovereignty and security, the human right to adequate
food and democratic, healthy and sustainable food systems on the international
level, through dialogue and international cooperation. Recognition of HRAF as a
human right encouraged Brazil to also promote food and nutrition security and
sovereignty through international cooperation and dialogue. Law No. 11346/2006 is
guided by the principle of HRAF and proposes that the Brazilian State should make
efforts to promote technical cooperation with other countries, thus contributing
to the strengthening of public food and nutrition security policies based on food
sovereignty.
Brazil has also insisted on the structuring of an FNS governance system and
processes that prevents conflicts of interest in defining and implementing the pub-
lic agenda.
Brazil’s commitments to consolidating Food and Nutrition Security gover-
nance and support for initiatives promoting sovereignty and the Human Right to
Adequate Food on the international level:
35
Prepare the 3rd National Food and Nutrition Security Plan and support
the holding of the 6th National Conference on Food and Nutrition Secu-
rity.
36
Ensure the functioning of the National Food and Nutrition Security Coun-
cil (CONSEA).
37
Work to implement the Plan of Action of the 2nd International Conference
on Nutrition (ICN2), with emphasis on formulating and implementing the
International Decade on Nutrition, aimed at international recognition
and concerted efforts to address the multiple causes and consequences
of malnutrition.
	
38
Strengthen and scale up mechanisms and actions of political dialogue
and cooperation with Portuguese-speaking countries, both bilaterally
and through the Community of Portuguese-Speaking Countries (CPLP).
16 | | 17
APPENDIX
Manifest of the 5th National Conference on Food and Nutrition Security to
Brazilian Society regarding Real Food in the Country and the City: more Rights
and Food Sovereignty.
Real food is the safeguard of life. It is healthy both for human beings and the
planet and contributes to reducing the effects of climate change. It ensures human
rights, the right to land and to territory, as well as to adequate quantities of quality
food at all ages. It respects the rights of women, the diversity of indigenous peoples,
quilombola communities, traditional peoples of African origin and associated reli-
gions, gypsies, forest and riverside peoples, other traditional and rural peoples and
communities, from production to consumption. It protects and promotes dietary
cultures, socio-biodiversity, ancestral practices, the use of herbs and traditional
medicine, the sacred dimension of foodstuffs.
Real food begins with breastfeeding. Real food is produced by family farming
based on agroecology and using heirloom and native seeds. It is produced through
adequate use of natural resources, taking into consideration the principles of sus-
tainability and traditional knowledge and its regional specificities. It is free from
pesticides, transgenic crops, fertilizers and all types of contaminants.
Real food guarantees food sovereignty; protects cultural and genetic heritage;
recognizes memory, aesthetics, knowledge, flavours, ways of doing and speaking,
identity, the rites involved, autochthonous technologies and their innovations. Real
food is that which considers water to be nutriment. It is produced in decent working
conditions. It is socially just. Real food is not subject to market interests.
Real food is characterized by fresh and minimally processed ingredients, rather
than ultra-processed products. It needs to be physically accessible and affordable,
connecting production with consumption. It should meet special dietary needs.
Real food is that which is shared with emotions and harmony. It promotes healthy
eating habits in the country, in the forest and in the city.
Eating is a political act. Real food is that which recognizes women’s protago-
nism, respects the principles of integrality, universality and equity. It does not kill
through poisoning nor through conflict. Real food is that which eradicates hunger
and promotes healthy eating, conserves nature, promotes health and peace be-
tween peoples.
Food in Brazil is the result of the coming together of peoples and cultures that
have formed our nation and carries in its history the pain and suffering of native
peoples and enslaved Africans, which are perpetuated in the restrictions to access
to land and production methods.
In recent years great achievements have been made with the Food and Nutri-
tion Security Policy, with the participation of traditional peoples and communities,
social organizations and movements in its building and implementation guided by
respect for socio-biodiversity.
Constitutional Amendment No. 64 was approved in 2010, establishing the Hu-
man Right to Adequate Food. The increasing awareness of society and government
as to the importance of healthy eating has caused a great impact, by strengthening
family and peasant farming and prioritizing more vulnerable populations, recog-
nizing the diversity of Indigenous Peoples, Traditional Peoples and Communities
(Decree No. 6040/2007) and promoting the visibility of food production sources in
cultural and dietary diversity. Furthermore, social participation in accountability has
been strengthened; infant mortality has reduced after having been related to high
rates of malnutrition; eating fresh food and reducing consumption of ultra-pro-
cessed food products has been encouraged. Other progress stands out, such as the
Food Guideline for the Brazilian Population and the revision of the National Policy
on Food and Nutrition.
In 2014, Brazil was taken off the Hunger Map. This important achievement is
the result of intense debates and civil society mobilization in building public pol-
icies, creating and strengthening the National Food and Nutrition Security System
through programmes such as: the Food Purchasing Programme, the National School
Feeding Programme, the National Family Farming Strengthening Programme; access
to water (the 1 Million Cisterns Project and the 1 Plot of Land and 2 Water Cisterns
Project); and promotion of agroecological farming.
Despite the struggles and achievements, there is still highly concentrated land
ownership, growth of monoculture, permission to produce transgenic crops and
encouraged use of pesticides. We are facing a serious water crisis, as well as expan-
sion in the consumption of ultra-processed foodstuffs in the dietary dynamics of
the Brazilian population.
In order to eat real food, find out the truth about what you eat!
We call on the entire Brazilian population to become aware of Real Food and
the Human Right to Adequate Food (HRAF)! And to involve teaching, research and
extension institutions, civil society organizations, state and private schools as part-
ners in guidance to achieve production, commercialization and consumption of ad-
equate and healthy food, taking part and requiring accountability of public food
and nutrition safety policies. Inspired by alimentary ethics, we reaffirm the value of
the country’s dietary and cultural diversity.
18 |
We urge the three levels of government to ensure public policies on access
to land, drinking water, urban and rural environmental sanitation, native seeds,
quality technical assistance and land tenure regularization of indigenous and qui-
lombola territories and those of other traditional peoples and communities, as
well as settlements and territories of citizenship identity; to strengthen family and
peasant farming and traditional peoples and communities in the socially just and
sustainable production, consumption and commercialization of food free from pes-
ticides, chemical additives and transgenic crops. In addition, health promotion and
protection actions need to be strengthened and scaled up, especially the regulation
of food advertising and labelling, as well as access to information by people with
disabilities and special food needs.
We call on civil society and government to celebrate progress made with food
and nutrition security and to revitalize Brazil’s real food in order to achieve food
sovereignty and consolidate food and nutrition security.
Brasília, November 6th
2015.
Interministerial Food and Nutrition Security Chamber (CAISAN)
Esplanada dos Ministérios – Bloco C – 6º andar
CEP: 70.046-900 – Brasília/DF
Telefones: (61) 2030-1085 / 2030-2036
caisan@mds.gov.br
Brazil’s Commitments to the United Nations Decade of Action on Nutrition (2016-2025)

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Brazil’s Commitments to the United Nations Decade of Action on Nutrition (2016-2025)

  • 1.
  • 2. EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC MINISTRY OF SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, LIVESTOCK AND FOOD SUPPLY MINISTRY OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, INNOVATION AND COMMUNICATIONS MINISTRY OF CULTURE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION MINISTRY OF FINANCES MINISTRY OF NATIONAL INTEGRATION MINISTRY OF JUSTICE AND PUBLIC SECURITIY MINISTRY OF HEALTH MINISTRY OF CITIES MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT MINISTRY OF PLANNING, DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT MINISTRY OF LABOUR MINISTRY OF HUMAN RIGHTS GOVERNMENT SECRETARIAT – OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC SPECIAL SECRETARIAT FOR FAMILY FARMING AND AGRARIAN DEVELOPMENT NATIONAL SECRETARIAT FOR RACIAL EQUALITY PROMOTION POLICIES NATIONAL SECRETARIAT FOR WOMEN’S POLICIES
  • 3. 4 | | 5 Foreword The Decade of Action on Nutrition is a strategy that has come at an appropri- ate time. Despite the significant progress that many countries have made in recent years, globally progress has been unequal and modest with regard to eradicating all forms of malnutrition. Achieving complex goals such as ending hunger and malnu- trition, as well as ensuring universal access by the world’s population to healthier and sustainable diets, will only be possible through governance that promotes con- vergence on the agenda by all sectors. The Decade, together with other global strategies such as the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, has the potential to strengthen the approach whereby all forms of malnutrition should be treated in an articulated manner and all coun- tries are affected by and responsible for the global situation; as well as the poten- tial to encourage the alignment of domestic and foreign policies in the different sectors involved in addressing all forms of malnutrition; favour the overcoming of the traditional division between donor and recipient countries; articulate different sectors, programmes, actions and subjects; foster the vision of multidetermination and the dimensions of nourishment and its expressions; create conditions for po- litical and budgetary commitments to be established in order to achieve food and nutrition goals; and establish a monitoring and accountability system. It is important to highlight that the implementation of the agenda envisaged for the Decade will directly impact the achievement of the Sustainable Develop- ment Goals (SDG) by the different countries, given that as well as there being Goals directly related to nutrition and to food and nutrition security, indirect relationships can be identified between the Decade’s commitments and practically all the SDGs. Brazil is engaging in this global movement based on the understanding that malnutrition, in all its forms – including undernourishment, micronutrient deficien- cies, overweight and obesity – affects not only people’s health and well-being, but also generates devastating social and economic consequences for families, com- munities and States; and that its determination is related to multiple causes, as well as to the prevailing food system. Caio Rocha Executive Secretariat National Interministerial Food and Nutrition Security Chamber The world’s populations still suffer from multiple forms of malnutrition. Six of the eleven major disease burden risk factors are related to nourishment. Be- sides affecting people’s health and well-being, the various forms of malnutri- tion result in a high disease burden with social and economic consequences for health systems, communities and families in the different countries. With the aim of ending poverty, promoting prosperity and the well-being of all people, in addition to protecting the environment in a context of climate changes, in 2015 the United Nations endorsed the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), opening a new era of international cooperation and national efforts to achieve the 2030 Agenda. Twelve of the seventeen SDGs require good nutrition status in order to be achieved. Reaffirming the 2030 Agenda commitments and setting nutrition as a priority, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed the Decade of Action on Nutrition (2016-2025). The aim is to coordinate efforts with effective participation of the countries in order to address all forms of mal- nutrition. Pan American Health Organization/ World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) Brazil compliments the Brazilian Government on the declaration of its 38 SMART commitments for the Decade of Action on Nutrition presented in this publication. PAHO/WHO Brazil is also at the disposal of national Brazilian authorities to con- tinue with and strengthen its technical cooperation with the aim of accelerating the process of addressing all forms of malnutrition from a perspective of the food system. The Decade of Action on Nutrition is a great opportunity for improved coordination between diverse stakeholders and partners, from different sectors, in order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Joaquín Molina PAHO/WHO Brazil Country Representative
  • 4. 6 | | 7 One of the commitments under the United Nations Decade of Action on Nu- trition (2016-2025) was fulfilled when, in 2014, Brazil surpassed expectations and was taken off the UN Hunger Map. Nevertheless, despite the significant progress made, the country still faces a large number of problems relating to malnutrition. Whilst Brazil has managed to overcome hunger, on the other hand over- weight and obesity rates have increased considerably in recent years among both adults and children. This situation generates important impacts on health and needs to be a priority on family and government agendas. As such the Decade of Action on Nutrition initiative framework is a major opportunity for significantly reducing malnutrition indicators, through initiatives such as the Criança Feliz programme, which seeks to achieve integral develop- ment in early childhood. It is therefore crucial at this time that we advance even more with the imple- mentation of public policies to combat hunger and malnutrition globally. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) congratulates the Brazilian Government on its declaration of international commitment to the United Nations Decade of Action on Nutrition, reaffirming its dedication to ensur- ing that such commitments become concrete policies and programmes, such as the promotion of sustainable and resilient food systems, capable of resulting in improved nutrition by 2025. Alan Bojanic FAO Representative in Brazil The Brazilian context The Brazilian Nutrition and Food Systems Agenda is based on the principles of ensuring Food and Nutrition Security and the realization of the Human Right to Adequate Food (HRAF), this being a right that has been laid down in the Brazilian Constitution since the year 2010. Brazil has established Food and Nutrition Security governance as a State agenda, involving Laws, Decrees, budget and a defined mon- itoring system (Law No. 11346/2006 and Decree No. 7272/2010). In Brazil, Food and Nutrition Security (FNS) governance is made operational through a National Food and Nutrition Security System (SISAN). The System rep- resents the Brazilian conception of FNS1 , reinforces intersectorality; the federative relationship between the Union, States and Municipalities and social participation. Its purpose is to ensure that all people living within the national territory are free from hunger, in addition to ensuring the right to real food – this being a multidi- mensional concept established at the 5th National Conference on Food and Nutri- tion Security, held in November 20152 . The System led to the formulation of the National Food and Nutrition Security Policy (PNSAN) in 2010. The Policy is made operational through 4-year Plans con- taining guidelines, targets, resources and monitoring and evaluation instruments, involving different sectors of government and society, in the quest for adequate and healthy food for everyone. The System includes an Interministerial Food and Nutrition Security Chamber (CAISAN) comprised of 20 Ministries and Special Sec- retariats, in line with the System’s intersectoral dimension, as well as a National Food and Nutrition Security Council (CONSEA), comprised of 2/3 civil society and 1/3 government membership, in keeping with the principle of social participation. The 1st National Food and Nutrition Security Plan (PLANSAN 2012-2015) en- abled Brazil to be taken off the Hunger Map in 2014. The 2nd National Food and Nutrition Security Plan (PLANSAN 2016-2019) is currently in force and is the fruit of a process of intersectoral and participatory discussion. It brings together in an organized manner a set of policies, programmes and actions, having 121 targets, involving actions by 14 Ministries and an annual estimated budget of almost BRL 1 Law No. 11346/2006 defines Food and Nutrition Security as the fulfilment of everyone’s right to regular and permanent access to sufficient quantities of quality food, without compromising access to other essential needs, based on food and eating practices that promote health, respect cultural diversity and are environmentally, culturally, economically and socially sustainable. 2 The National FNS Conference is held every 4 years and is the body responsible for indicating FNS Na- tional Policy and Plan guidelines and priorities to the National Food and Nutrition Security Council, as well as being responsible for SISAN monitoring. The Conference is the high point of social dialogue aimed at enhancing the Policy and the Plan. Its primary mission it to look ahead, reflect and present new proposals. The 5th Conference took place in November 2015, having as its theme “Real Food in the country and the city: more rights and food sovereignty”. The Manifesto of the 5th Conference is attached to this document.
  • 5. 8 | | 9 100 billion. It is within this context that Brazil presents its commitments to the Decade of Action on Nutrition, emphasizing that these commitments, aligned with the Na- tional FNS Plan targets, aim to contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. It is our understanding that the agendas of the Decade and the SDG agendas are related and that the articulation of intersectoral and participatory responses with the issues presented forms part of the broader context of the im- plementation of the 2030 Agenda. Brazil’s commitments within the Decade of Action on Nutrition As part of the Decade, the 60 Recommendations of the 2nd International Con- ference on Nutrition (ICN2) Framework for Action have been divided among six pil- lars. These pillars dialogue to a great extent with the 9 Challenges proposed by the 2nd National Food and Nutrition Security Plan (PLANSAN 2016-2019). As such, Brazil presents its commitments – in the SMART format (Specific, Mea- surable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-bound) – to the Decade of Action on Nutri- tion in a manner which is aligned with the targets already set in its National FNS Plan. It should be noted that in virtue of the 2nd PLANSAN currently being in force, the commitments presented here are to be achieved by 2019. »» Pillar 1 – Sustainable, resilient food systems for healthy diets The first Pillar of the Decade highlights the causal relationship between sus- tainable food systems and healthy eating. It reinforces the importance of invest- ment and public policies that integrate nutrition, food and agriculture policies, strengthening local food production and processing, especially by family farmers. Many of the targets contained in Challenge 3 of the 2nd PLANSAN2016-2019: Promoting the production of healthy and sustainable food, the structuring of fam- ily farming and the strengthening of agroecology-based production systems are in response to the ICN2 Recommendations relating to Pillar 1. This Pillar also dia- logues directly with PLANSAN 2 Challenge 4: Promoting the supply and regular and permanent access by the Brazilian population to adequate and healthy food. These Challenges are anchored in the premise that healthy and sustainable food systems are those that conceive of a sustainable model right from food production, the commercialization and supply stages, through to its consumption. Brazil’s commitments to promoting production of and access to healthy and sustainable food and to structuring family farming: 1 Provide targeted and continuous technical assistance and qualified rural extension to 1 million family farming families, including technical assis- tance and rural extension for rural youth and traditional peoples and communities, ensuring that 50% of people assisted are women and that 30% of the budget is allocated to specific activities of women. 2 Provide the means to enable 1.8 million microcredit operations, guided and accompanied by the National Family Farming Strengthening Pro- gramme (PRONAF). 3 Enable 1.35 million family farming families to adhere to Harvest Insur- ance, whereby preferably adherence to insurance is done in the name of rural women. 4 Provide 390,000 family farmers with Family Farming Insurance, prioritizing the development of new coverage models for family farming segments without coverage. 5 Encourage 1 million men and women family farmers, agrarian reform set- tlers and traditional peoples and communities, including rural youth, to use production systems that are agroecology-based, organic or in agro- ecological transition. 6 Establish and monitor the National Socio-biodiversity Programme, in ar- ticulation with the Interministerial Agroecology and Organic Production Chamber and with the National Agroecology and Organic Production Commission. 7 Provide the means for rural women to undertake at least 35% of microcre- dit operations carried out and 20% of the total volume of credit accessed via PRONAF. 8 Assist 1,500 groups of rural women food producers with integrated tech- nical assistance and rural extension, credit, commercialization and man- agement actions, strengthening agroecological production. 9 Assist 80,000 family farming youths, ensuring the participation of youth from traditional peoples and community sectors, with specific technical assistance and rural extension for rural youth. 10 Enable rural youth to access at least 20% of National Family Farming Strengthening Programme credit operations, ensuring the participation of youth from traditional peoples and community segments. 11 Promote access to and production of varietal and native seeds and seed- lings, via the National Family Farming Seeds and Seedlings Programme. 12 Scale up public purchases of Family Farming produce to R$ 2.5 billion.
  • 6. 10 | | 11 13 Promote an annual increase of 2.5% in financial resources transferred by the National School Feeding Programme allocated to purchasing food- stuffs produced by Family Farming. 14 Establish a legal framework for reducing food loss and wastage. 15 Support the structuring of Public Food and Nutrition Security Facilities to receive healthy food, including food produced by Family Farming. »» Pillar 2 - Aligned health systems providing universal cover- age of essential nutrition actions The second Pillar highlights the importance of health systems effectively incor- porating nutrition actions, promoting universal access by the population to health programmes and actions that have impact on nutritional aspects. This Pillar also supports the implementation of health targets and strategies related to this theme, such as the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding and the WHO Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases (2013-2020). In the case of the 2nd PLANSAN, it is Challenge 5: Promote and protect Adequate and Healthy Eating for the Brazilian Population, through food and nutrition edu- cation strategies and regulatory measures and Challenge 6: Control and prevent adverse health conditions arising from poor nourishment which address aspects related to this theme. Inadequate food and overweight are risk factors for Chron- ic Noncommunicable Diseases (CNCD) such as hypertension, diabetes and cancer. Addressing this situation demands joint action by the different government levels, through intersectoral actions and social participation. Brazil’s commitments to promoting and protecting Adequate and Healthy Eating and to controlling and preventing adverse health conditions arising from poor nourishment: 16 Reduce regular consumption of soft drinks and artificial fruit juices by at least 30% in the adult population (current rate is 16.5%). 17 Increase by at least 17.8% the percentage of adults who regularly con- sume fruit and vegetables (current rate is 35.2%). 18 Stem the growth of obesity in the adult population (current rate is 20.8%). 19 Implement the Intersectoral Strategy on Obesity Prevention and Control. 20 Agree and monitor targets for reducing sodium in processed foods in Bra- zil. 21 Make an agreement to reduce sugar in priority category products, based on ample discussion with society. »» Pillar 3 - Social protection and nutrition education The third Pillar highlights the importance of incorporating the nutrition agen- da into social protection and humanitarian aid programmes, as well as implement- ing nutrition information and education actions such as, for example, interventions based on national food guides. This Pillar also includes policies on income transfer, food donation and school feeding programmes. PLANSAN Challenge 1: Promote universal access to adequate and healthy food, prioritizing families and people in situations of food and nutrition insecurity, ad- dresses the issue of linking food and nutrition security to social protection. In par- allel, Challenge 2 - Combat food and nutrition insecurity and promote productive rural inclusion among specific population groups, with emphasis on Traditional Peoples and Communities and other vulnerable social groups in rural areas, ad- dresses hunger among specific population groups. Although hunger is no longer considered to be a structural problem in Brazil, food and nutrition insecurity still persists among some population groups. As such, building and executing differentiated and specific policies, based on the princi- ples of ethnodevelopment, which respect the cultures, forms of social organization, ethnic and racial specificities and gender issues, is the path to be taken. The need exists to ensure the continuity and enhancement of policies that scale up access to food by groups most vulnerable to hunger, so as to overcome malnutrition among these groups as well. In turn, Challenge 5 mentioned above emphasizes the im- portance of food and nutrition education strategies in promoting Adequate and Healthy Eating. Brazil’s commitments to promoting universal access to adequate and healthy food, prioritizing families and people facing food and nutrition insecurity, tradi- tional peoples and communities and other vulnerable social groups: 22 Transfer income to families in situations of poverty who meet the eligi- bility criteria, in accordance with the Bolsa Família (Family Grant) Pro- gramme service estimates. 23 Supply school meals to 40 million state school children, per annum, in- cluding 230,000 indigenous students and 230,000 quilombola students.
  • 7. 12 | | 13 24 Implement the new Food Distribution Action legal framework, in accor- dance with the Human Right to Adequate Food, respecting food habits and cultures, with emphasis on more vulnerable territories, as indicated by the study entitled Food and Nutrition Insecurity Mapping, conducted by the Interministerial Food and Nutrition Security Chamber (CAISAN). 25 Reduce by 25% underweight-for-age among indigenous children below 5 years of age accompanied under the health conditions of the Bolsa Família Programme, by means of articulated actions within the scope of the Interministerial Food and Nutrition Security Chamber (CAISAN), prior- itizing socio-biodiversity-related production and dietary practices. 26 Reduce by 20% underweight-for-age among quilombola children below 5 years of age accompanied under the health conditions of the Bolsa Família Programme, by means of articulated actions within the scope of the Interministerial Food and Nutrition Security Chamber (CAISAN), prior- itizing socio-biodiversity-related production and dietary practices. 27 Identify groups and territories most vulnerable in terms of food and nu- trition security, by means of the study entitled Food and Nutrition In- security Mapping, conducted by the Interministerial Food and Nutrition Security Chamber (CAISAN), with the aim of informing coordinated and federative Food and Nutrition Security actions. 28 Implement the recommendations of the Food Guide for the Brazilian Pop- ulation for children aged under two years old, emphasizing the consump- tion of regional food and sustainable production practices that respect biodiversity. »» Pillar 4 - Trade and investment for improved nutrition In recognition of the relevance of trade and investment in food systems, food and food and nutrition security, this Pillar focuses on encouraging governments, United Nations agencies, programmes and funds, the World Trade Organization (WTO) and other international organizations to identify opportunities for achieving global food and nutrition targets through trade and investment policies. It also focuses on improving food availability and supply through trade agreements and policies, including fiscal instruments such as taxation, subsidies and incentives in terms of supply. ICN2 Recommendation 4, linked to this Pillar, stresses the impor- tance of scaling up sustainable and responsible investments in nutrition, especially national level domestic investments; generating additional resources through inno- vative funding instruments; adherence of development partners to scale up Official Development Assistance with nutrition and the adoption of private investments, when appropriate. »» Pillar 5 - Safe and supportive environments for nutrition at all ages Pillar 5 places emphasis on the importance of environmental determinants in the occurrence of all forms of malnutrition. This includes diverse types of environ- ment, such as domestic environments, school environments, work and institutional environments, such as hospitals. This Pillar focuses on ICN2 Plan of Action Recom- mendations 1-7, as well as on actions for access to water and sanitation and actions to promote, protect and support breastfeeding. By recognizing the importance of access to quality water for nutrition, PLAN- SAN 2 puts forward a specific challenge for dealing with the issue, namely Challenge 7 - Scale up water availability and the population’s access to water, in particu- lar poor people in rural areas. Targets relating to promoting breastfeeding, as well as promoting healthy diets in education and health environments, are covered by Challenge 5 as mentioned earlier. Brazil’s commitments to scaling up water availability and promoting healthy diets in diverse environments and at all stages of life: 29 Implant the National Strategy to Promote Breastfeeding and Complemen- tary Feeding on the Unified Health System in more than 2,000 primary health centres. 30 Include Food and Nutrition Education information on the 4th cover of the text books of 120,000 elementary education schools. 31 Regulate commercialization, advertising, publicity and commercial pro- motion of processed and ultra-processed food and drink in public and private health and education systems, social services facilities and public bodies. 32 Implant plate cisterns and other social technologies for accessing water for human consumption, preferably or primarily for households headed by women. 33 Implant 8,000 cisterns in schools. 34 Implant 120,000 social technologies for access to water for production, preferably or primarily for households headed by women.
  • 8. 14 | | 15 »» Pillar 6 – Review, strengthen and promote nutrition gover- nance and accountability The final Pillar of the Decade of Action on Nutrition includes permanent moni- toring of the achievement of global targets for food and nutrition and CNCD control and prevention; creation of policies and legislation and programme implementa- tion. The Recommendations linked to this Pillar place priority on two aspects. The first aspect addresses nutrition governance: the importance of developing nation- al nutrition plans, aligning intersectoral policies with impact on nutrition through different ministries and agencies and the strengthening of legal frameworks and strategic potentialities for nutrition. The second aspect relates to collaboration be- tween countries, such as North-North, South-South and triangular cooperation, as well as sharing information on nutrition, diet, technology, research, policies and programmes. In PLANSAN 2, each of these aspects is found in a Challenge. Governance-re- lated strategies are provided for in Challenge 8 - Consolidate the implementation of the National Food and Nutrition Security System (SISAN), enhancing federative management, intersectorality and social participation. In addition to strengthening the components of the System, Challenge 8 has targets and actions relating to FNS research and extension, developing abilities for the Human Right to Adequate Food (HRAF), building instruments for HRAF demandability and the enhancement of the PNSAN monitoring and indicators system. The aspect relating to the importance of collaboration between countries, em- phasized by Pillar 6, is found in PLANSAN 2 Challenge 9 - Support initiatives pro- moting food and nutrition sovereignty and security, the human right to adequate food and democratic, healthy and sustainable food systems on the international level, through dialogue and international cooperation. Recognition of HRAF as a human right encouraged Brazil to also promote food and nutrition security and sovereignty through international cooperation and dialogue. Law No. 11346/2006 is guided by the principle of HRAF and proposes that the Brazilian State should make efforts to promote technical cooperation with other countries, thus contributing to the strengthening of public food and nutrition security policies based on food sovereignty. Brazil has also insisted on the structuring of an FNS governance system and processes that prevents conflicts of interest in defining and implementing the pub- lic agenda. Brazil’s commitments to consolidating Food and Nutrition Security gover- nance and support for initiatives promoting sovereignty and the Human Right to Adequate Food on the international level: 35 Prepare the 3rd National Food and Nutrition Security Plan and support the holding of the 6th National Conference on Food and Nutrition Secu- rity. 36 Ensure the functioning of the National Food and Nutrition Security Coun- cil (CONSEA). 37 Work to implement the Plan of Action of the 2nd International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2), with emphasis on formulating and implementing the International Decade on Nutrition, aimed at international recognition and concerted efforts to address the multiple causes and consequences of malnutrition. 38 Strengthen and scale up mechanisms and actions of political dialogue and cooperation with Portuguese-speaking countries, both bilaterally and through the Community of Portuguese-Speaking Countries (CPLP).
  • 9. 16 | | 17 APPENDIX Manifest of the 5th National Conference on Food and Nutrition Security to Brazilian Society regarding Real Food in the Country and the City: more Rights and Food Sovereignty. Real food is the safeguard of life. It is healthy both for human beings and the planet and contributes to reducing the effects of climate change. It ensures human rights, the right to land and to territory, as well as to adequate quantities of quality food at all ages. It respects the rights of women, the diversity of indigenous peoples, quilombola communities, traditional peoples of African origin and associated reli- gions, gypsies, forest and riverside peoples, other traditional and rural peoples and communities, from production to consumption. It protects and promotes dietary cultures, socio-biodiversity, ancestral practices, the use of herbs and traditional medicine, the sacred dimension of foodstuffs. Real food begins with breastfeeding. Real food is produced by family farming based on agroecology and using heirloom and native seeds. It is produced through adequate use of natural resources, taking into consideration the principles of sus- tainability and traditional knowledge and its regional specificities. It is free from pesticides, transgenic crops, fertilizers and all types of contaminants. Real food guarantees food sovereignty; protects cultural and genetic heritage; recognizes memory, aesthetics, knowledge, flavours, ways of doing and speaking, identity, the rites involved, autochthonous technologies and their innovations. Real food is that which considers water to be nutriment. It is produced in decent working conditions. It is socially just. Real food is not subject to market interests. Real food is characterized by fresh and minimally processed ingredients, rather than ultra-processed products. It needs to be physically accessible and affordable, connecting production with consumption. It should meet special dietary needs. Real food is that which is shared with emotions and harmony. It promotes healthy eating habits in the country, in the forest and in the city. Eating is a political act. Real food is that which recognizes women’s protago- nism, respects the principles of integrality, universality and equity. It does not kill through poisoning nor through conflict. Real food is that which eradicates hunger and promotes healthy eating, conserves nature, promotes health and peace be- tween peoples. Food in Brazil is the result of the coming together of peoples and cultures that have formed our nation and carries in its history the pain and suffering of native peoples and enslaved Africans, which are perpetuated in the restrictions to access to land and production methods. In recent years great achievements have been made with the Food and Nutri- tion Security Policy, with the participation of traditional peoples and communities, social organizations and movements in its building and implementation guided by respect for socio-biodiversity. Constitutional Amendment No. 64 was approved in 2010, establishing the Hu- man Right to Adequate Food. The increasing awareness of society and government as to the importance of healthy eating has caused a great impact, by strengthening family and peasant farming and prioritizing more vulnerable populations, recog- nizing the diversity of Indigenous Peoples, Traditional Peoples and Communities (Decree No. 6040/2007) and promoting the visibility of food production sources in cultural and dietary diversity. Furthermore, social participation in accountability has been strengthened; infant mortality has reduced after having been related to high rates of malnutrition; eating fresh food and reducing consumption of ultra-pro- cessed food products has been encouraged. Other progress stands out, such as the Food Guideline for the Brazilian Population and the revision of the National Policy on Food and Nutrition. In 2014, Brazil was taken off the Hunger Map. This important achievement is the result of intense debates and civil society mobilization in building public pol- icies, creating and strengthening the National Food and Nutrition Security System through programmes such as: the Food Purchasing Programme, the National School Feeding Programme, the National Family Farming Strengthening Programme; access to water (the 1 Million Cisterns Project and the 1 Plot of Land and 2 Water Cisterns Project); and promotion of agroecological farming. Despite the struggles and achievements, there is still highly concentrated land ownership, growth of monoculture, permission to produce transgenic crops and encouraged use of pesticides. We are facing a serious water crisis, as well as expan- sion in the consumption of ultra-processed foodstuffs in the dietary dynamics of the Brazilian population. In order to eat real food, find out the truth about what you eat! We call on the entire Brazilian population to become aware of Real Food and the Human Right to Adequate Food (HRAF)! And to involve teaching, research and extension institutions, civil society organizations, state and private schools as part- ners in guidance to achieve production, commercialization and consumption of ad- equate and healthy food, taking part and requiring accountability of public food and nutrition safety policies. Inspired by alimentary ethics, we reaffirm the value of the country’s dietary and cultural diversity.
  • 10. 18 | We urge the three levels of government to ensure public policies on access to land, drinking water, urban and rural environmental sanitation, native seeds, quality technical assistance and land tenure regularization of indigenous and qui- lombola territories and those of other traditional peoples and communities, as well as settlements and territories of citizenship identity; to strengthen family and peasant farming and traditional peoples and communities in the socially just and sustainable production, consumption and commercialization of food free from pes- ticides, chemical additives and transgenic crops. In addition, health promotion and protection actions need to be strengthened and scaled up, especially the regulation of food advertising and labelling, as well as access to information by people with disabilities and special food needs. We call on civil society and government to celebrate progress made with food and nutrition security and to revitalize Brazil’s real food in order to achieve food sovereignty and consolidate food and nutrition security. Brasília, November 6th 2015. Interministerial Food and Nutrition Security Chamber (CAISAN) Esplanada dos Ministérios – Bloco C – 6º andar CEP: 70.046-900 – Brasília/DF Telefones: (61) 2030-1085 / 2030-2036 caisan@mds.gov.br