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Effectively Implementing  Teacher- Based  Teams
Training Outcomes <ul><li>Participants will become familiar with the  Four Stages of Group Development  </li></ul><ul><li>...
Group Norms <ul><li>Stay Focused </li></ul><ul><li>Manage Electronic Devices </li></ul><ul><li>Practice Timely Attendance ...
Resource 22:   Assessing Teacher-Based Team Effectiveness Checklist <ul><li>Independently complete the checklist.  </li></...
Teacher-Based Teams <ul><li>Sometimes referred to as… </li></ul><ul><li>Professional Learning Communities  (PLCs) </li></u...
http://www1.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=46926
Snowballs <ul><li>From the video, choose an occurrence, action, or event that you have personally experienced in a meeting...
<ul><li>Upon request, retrieve one “snowball” and return to your seat. </li></ul><ul><li>Form a triad and discuss the info...
Tools <ul><li>Note-Taking Protocols </li></ul><ul><li>Norms </li></ul><ul><li>Agenda Examples </li></ul><ul><li>Providing ...
Lawnmower Paradox <ul><li>As a generalization, pooling physical effort is easy, but pooling mental effort is hard. It is e...
COBLABORATION <ul><li>“ We’ve all experienced coblaboration:  just think of a meeting that seemed to last forever and acco...
Coblaboration, The Soundtrack Yakety Yak…The Coasters You Talk Too Much…Run DMC Talkin’ to Myself…Eminem When You Say Noth...
Collaboration:  The Soundtrack
Why TBTs? <ul><li>Teachers working together rather than in isolation improves classroom instruction.  –Reeves, 2007 </li><...
The DLT, BLT, TBT Connection <ul><li>Collaborative team structures that support a culture of inquiry  </li></ul><ul><li>Us...
What is a TBT’s Work? <ul><li>Use data to assess student learning and to make decisions about teaching and learning; </li>...
Stages  of Group Development
<ul><li>If work groups are going to successfully collaborate to tackle difficult issues and make systemic change, they mus...
 
Stage One Group <ul><li>Assumes consensus about goal exists. </li></ul><ul><li>Assigns roles based on: </li></ul><ul><li> ...
Stage One Group Member <ul><li>Concerned with safety </li></ul><ul><li>Concerned with acceptance and inclusion </li></ul><...
Stage One Group Leader <ul><li>Seen as benevolent and competent </li></ul><ul><li>Seen as providing direction and safety <...
Stage One - Forming
Stage One - Forming <ul><li>“ I’m not looking for the  best  players, Craig.  I’m looking for the  right  ones.” </li></ul...
Silence of the Lambs <ul><li>You know you’re in a Stage One group when the leader asks a question and no one responds.   <...
Stage Two Group <ul><li>Conflicts about values emerge </li></ul><ul><li>Goal  and role clarification begins </li></ul><ul>...
Stage Two Group Members <ul><li>Begin to disagree about goals and tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Dissatisfaction with roles may s...
Stage Two Group Leader <ul><li>The leader is frequently challenged or must often arbitrate between factions.  The role bec...
Stage Two - Storming
Stage Two - Storming <ul><li>“ We start becoming a team right now.” </li></ul><ul><li>- Herb Brooks </li></ul>
Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing <ul><li>You know you’re in a Stage II group when you’d rather have a root canal than attend the...
Stage Three Group <ul><li>Increased goal clarity and consensus </li></ul><ul><li>Roles and tasks adjusted towards goal ach...
Stage Three Group Members <ul><li>Satisfaction increases </li></ul><ul><li>Cohesion and trust increase </li></ul><ul><li>I...
Stage Three Group Leader <ul><li>Leadership is evolving into a consultant role with most time spent facilitating rather th...
Stage 3 - Norming
Stage Three - Norming <ul><li>“ Who do you play for?” </li></ul><ul><li>- Herb Brooks </li></ul>
It’s Just Part of the Job <ul><li>You know you’re in a Stage III group when the member who has driven you crazy for weeks ...
Stage Four Group <ul><li>Tasks are geared to group rather than individual solutions. </li></ul><ul><li>Communication struc...
Stage Four Group Members <ul><li>Clear about group goals </li></ul><ul><li>Agree with group goals </li></ul><ul><li>Clear ...
Stage Four Group Leader <ul><li>Leadership emerges to fit the task through delegation.  “Experts” take ownership for the c...
Stage Four - Performing
Stage Three - Performing <ul><li>“ Do you believe in miracles?  Yes!” </li></ul><ul><li>- Al Michaels </li></ul>
Nirvana <ul><li>You know you’re in a  Stage IV Group when being  on the team  makes you feel better than Prozac. </li></ul>
The Ohio  5-Step  Process: A Cycle of Inquiry
Keep it Simple…Follow the Basics <ul><li>Give a common assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Analyze results </li></ul><ul><li>Grou...
Step 1 <ul><li>Collect and Chart Student Data  </li></ul><ul><li>from a Common Assessment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Curriculum...
Video Clip <ul><li>Background </li></ul><ul><li>Lima Independence Elementary </li></ul><ul><li>4 th  Grade </li></ul><ul><...
Teacher Based Teams  –  Viewing Guide What do you see? Compare/Contrast to your current teacher teams Collaboration a. Wha...
Teacher-Based Team  Viewing Guide <ul><li>As you watch the clip, make “What Do You See” notes for the first two rows: </li...
 
<ul><li>Complete the “Compare/Contrast” Column  </li></ul><ul><li>for the Collaboration and Step 1 rows  </li></ul><ul><li...
Now It Is Your Turn  to Practice the Process <ul><li>Data provided is from a 4 th  grade language arts end-of- unit assess...
 
HO 5.1
Criteria for Grouping <ul><ul><li>49 correct and above = Advanced (85% and >) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>40-48 = Benchmark...
Subgroups <ul><li>This district has asked each building to intentionally monitor the academic progress of their SWDs. The ...
Step 2 <ul><li>Analyze student work  </li></ul><ul><li>specific to the data </li></ul>As you watch the clip, make notes in...
 
<ul><li>Complete the “Compare/Contrast” Column  </li></ul><ul><li>for the Step 2 Row  </li></ul><ul><li>on your viewing gu...
.
<ul><li>Establish shared expectations for implementing specific effective changes in the classroom.   </li></ul>Step 3 As ...
 
HO 4.3
<ul><li>Implement changes consistently across all classrooms </li></ul>Step 4
<ul><li>Collect, Chart and Analyze  </li></ul><ul><li>Post-Assessment Data </li></ul>Step 5 The 4 th  Grade Independence T...
 
Evaluate
Ohio 5-Step TBT Process  Inventory and Facilitation Next Steps Ohio TBT 5-Step Process  Implementation Rubric Resource 21 ...
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TBT Training - "Miracle" Version

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TBT Training - "Miracle" Version

  1. 1. Effectively Implementing Teacher- Based Teams
  2. 2. Training Outcomes <ul><li>Participants will become familiar with the Four Stages of Group Development </li></ul><ul><li>Participants will recognize the necessity of meeting structures and protocols </li></ul><ul><li>Participants will understand Ohio’s 5-Step Process </li></ul><ul><li>Participants will experience and practice Ohio’s 5-Step Process </li></ul>
  3. 3. Group Norms <ul><li>Stay Focused </li></ul><ul><li>Manage Electronic Devices </li></ul><ul><li>Practice Timely Attendance </li></ul><ul><li>Pass Notes Instead of Sidebar Talking </li></ul><ul><li>Respectfully Challenge One Another </li></ul><ul><li>Listen Actively </li></ul><ul><li>Participate to the Fullest of Your Ability </li></ul>
  4. 4. Resource 22: Assessing Teacher-Based Team Effectiveness Checklist <ul><li>Independently complete the checklist. </li></ul><ul><li>Be honest, candid, and reflective. </li></ul><ul><li>Please note grade-level team affiliation in the top right-hand corner. </li></ul><ul><li>No names are necessary. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Teacher-Based Teams <ul><li>Sometimes referred to as… </li></ul><ul><li>Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) </li></ul><ul><li>Grade-Level Teams </li></ul><ul><li>Content-Area Teams </li></ul><ul><li>Data Teams </li></ul>
  6. 6. http://www1.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=46926
  7. 7. Snowballs <ul><li>From the video, choose an occurrence, action, or event that you have personally experienced in a meeting. </li></ul><ul><li>Record the experience, as well as a description of how it made you feel, on the provided sheet of paper. </li></ul><ul><li>Once finished, “wad up” your “snowball” and throw it to the designated area. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Upon request, retrieve one “snowball” and return to your seat. </li></ul><ul><li>Form a triad and discuss the information found within your “snowball,” as well as strategies to deal with that behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Assign a reporter to share the main ideas of your discussion. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Tools <ul><li>Note-Taking Protocols </li></ul><ul><li>Norms </li></ul><ul><li>Agenda Examples </li></ul><ul><li>Providing Minutes </li></ul>
  10. 10. Lawnmower Paradox <ul><li>As a generalization, pooling physical effort is easy, but pooling mental effort is hard. It is easier for ten people to collaborate on mowing a large lawn than for ten people to collaborate on designing a lawnmower. </li></ul><ul><li>(David Perkins) </li></ul>
  11. 11. COBLABORATION <ul><li>“ We’ve all experienced coblaboration: just think of a meeting that seemed to last forever and accomplished nothing.” - David Perkins </li></ul><ul><li>Three Earmarks of Coblaboration : </li></ul><ul><li>A chaotic pattern of conversation that does not advance much </li></ul><ul><li>Huge time wasted on minor issues </li></ul><ul><li>Group Think: When people agree too easily and thoughtlessly on something </li></ul>
  12. 12. Coblaboration, The Soundtrack Yakety Yak…The Coasters You Talk Too Much…Run DMC Talkin’ to Myself…Eminem When You Say Nothing at All … Allison Krauss A Little Less Conversation … Elvis Presley What’d I Say…Ray Charles I Will Not Go Quietly … Don Henley Something to Talk About … Bonnie Raitt
  13. 13. Collaboration: The Soundtrack
  14. 14. Why TBTs? <ul><li>Teachers working together rather than in isolation improves classroom instruction. –Reeves, 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Using data across the system results in improved student learning. –Fullan, 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>Doing a few things well and deeply across the system results in sustainable improvement. –Patterson 2008. </li></ul>
  15. 15. The DLT, BLT, TBT Connection <ul><li>Collaborative team structures that support a culture of inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>Use of data and intentional decision making </li></ul><ul><li>Alignment of work to the </li></ul><ul><li>district’s goals and strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Shared Leadership: supporting ongoing two-way communication and engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Job embedded professional development (HQPD) </li></ul>
  16. 16. What is a TBT’s Work? <ul><li>Use data to assess student learning and to make decisions about teaching and learning; </li></ul><ul><li>Organize and present data in ways that identifies gaps and trends in student performance and requires intentional decisions; </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor adult indicators and student performance. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Stages of Group Development
  18. 18. <ul><li>If work groups are going to successfully collaborate to tackle difficult issues and make systemic change, they must have: </li></ul><ul><li>a clear understanding of why collaboration is critical to the success of the district, the building, the students. </li></ul><ul><li>the capacity to analyze data and assess current effectiveness. </li></ul><ul><li>knowledge of group process skills and tools combined with the willingness and ability to use them. </li></ul>
  19. 20. Stage One Group <ul><li>Assumes consensus about goal exists. </li></ul><ul><li>Assigns roles based on: </li></ul><ul><li> - external status </li></ul><ul><li> - first impressions </li></ul><ul><li>Communication tends to be centralized. </li></ul><ul><li>Lacks structure and organization </li></ul><ul><li>Cohesion and commitment based on leader identification. </li></ul><ul><li>Subgroups and coalitions are rare. </li></ul>
  20. 21. Stage One Group Member <ul><li>Concerned with safety </li></ul><ul><li>Concerned with acceptance and inclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Fear of rejection </li></ul><ul><li>Communication is tentative and polite </li></ul><ul><li>Seek dependable and directive leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Rarely express disagreement with goals </li></ul><ul><li>Compliance is high </li></ul><ul><li>Rarely deviate from emerging norms </li></ul><ul><li>See goals as unclear </li></ul><ul><li>Participation is limited </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict is limited </li></ul>
  21. 22. Stage One Group Leader <ul><li>Seen as benevolent and competent </li></ul><ul><li>Seen as providing direction and safety </li></ul><ul><li>Rarely challenged </li></ul>
  22. 23. Stage One - Forming
  23. 24. Stage One - Forming <ul><li>“ I’m not looking for the best players, Craig. I’m looking for the right ones.” </li></ul><ul><li>- Herb Brooks </li></ul>
  24. 25. Silence of the Lambs <ul><li>You know you’re in a Stage One group when the leader asks a question and no one responds. </li></ul>
  25. 26. Stage Two Group <ul><li>Conflicts about values emerge </li></ul><ul><li>Goal and role clarification begins </li></ul><ul><li>Subgroups and coalitions form as does intolerance </li></ul><ul><li>Conformity decreases </li></ul><ul><li>Deviation from norms increases </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict management is attempted </li></ul>
  26. 27. Stage Two Group Members <ul><li>Begin to disagree about goals and tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Dissatisfaction with roles may surface </li></ul><ul><li>Increased feelings of safety allow dissent to occur </li></ul><ul><li>May challenge the leader </li></ul><ul><li>Increase participation </li></ul>
  27. 28. Stage Two Group Leader <ul><li>The leader is frequently challenged or must often arbitrate between factions. The role becomes one of conflict resolution. </li></ul>
  28. 29. Stage Two - Storming
  29. 30. Stage Two - Storming <ul><li>“ We start becoming a team right now.” </li></ul><ul><li>- Herb Brooks </li></ul>
  30. 31. Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing <ul><li>You know you’re in a Stage II group when you’d rather have a root canal than attend the next group meeting. </li></ul>
  31. 32. Stage Three Group <ul><li>Increased goal clarity and consensus </li></ul><ul><li>Roles and tasks adjusted towards goal achievement </li></ul><ul><li>The structure of communication is flexible and content is task oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Pressure to conform increases again </li></ul><ul><li>Tolerance for coalitions and subgroups increases </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperation is evident </li></ul><ul><li>Division of labor that facilitates productivity </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict becomes manageable </li></ul>
  32. 33. Stage Three Group Members <ul><li>Satisfaction increases </li></ul><ul><li>Cohesion and trust increase </li></ul><ul><li>Individual commitment to the group goals and task is high </li></ul><ul><li>Helpful deviation is tolerated </li></ul>
  33. 34. Stage Three Group Leader <ul><li>Leadership is evolving into a consultant role with most time spent facilitating rather than directing the work. </li></ul>
  34. 35. Stage 3 - Norming
  35. 36. Stage Three - Norming <ul><li>“ Who do you play for?” </li></ul><ul><li>- Herb Brooks </li></ul>
  36. 37. It’s Just Part of the Job <ul><li>You know you’re in a Stage III group when the member who has driven you crazy for weeks begins to make you smile. </li></ul>
  37. 38. Stage Four Group <ul><li>Tasks are geared to group rather than individual solutions. </li></ul><ul><li>Communication structure matches demand of the task. It is open – all participate and are heard. </li></ul><ul><li>There is an appropriate ratio of Task to Supportive Communication. </li></ul>
  38. 39. Stage Four Group Members <ul><li>Clear about group goals </li></ul><ul><li>Agree with group goals </li></ul><ul><li>Clear about their roles </li></ul><ul><li>Accept roles and status in group </li></ul><ul><li>Role assignment matches member’s ability </li></ul><ul><li>Group views itself as a cohesive unit </li></ul><ul><li>Voluntary cooperation and conformity </li></ul><ul><li>Energy spent on tasks not group development </li></ul>
  39. 40. Stage Four Group Leader <ul><li>Leadership emerges to fit the task through delegation. “Experts” take ownership for the completion of specific projects. </li></ul>
  40. 41. Stage Four - Performing
  41. 42. Stage Three - Performing <ul><li>“ Do you believe in miracles? Yes!” </li></ul><ul><li>- Al Michaels </li></ul>
  42. 43. Nirvana <ul><li>You know you’re in a Stage IV Group when being on the team makes you feel better than Prozac. </li></ul>
  43. 44. The Ohio 5-Step Process: A Cycle of Inquiry
  44. 45. Keep it Simple…Follow the Basics <ul><li>Give a common assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Analyze results </li></ul><ul><li>Group and regroup students </li></ul><ul><li>Provide intervention/enrichment </li></ul><ul><li>Re-assess, evaluate </li></ul>
  45. 46. Step 1 <ul><li>Collect and Chart Student Data </li></ul><ul><li>from a Common Assessment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Curriculum-Based Measures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teacher-Created Assessments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>End-of-Unit Assessments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Purchased Questions </li></ul></ul>
  46. 47. Video Clip <ul><li>Background </li></ul><ul><li>Lima Independence Elementary </li></ul><ul><li>4 th Grade </li></ul><ul><li>Four core teachers, one special education teacher, and a building coach </li></ul><ul><li>Gave common assessment in math and came prepared to share results </li></ul>
  47. 48. Teacher Based Teams – Viewing Guide What do you see? Compare/Contrast to your current teacher teams Collaboration a. What protocols/roles do they have in place to ensure their collaboration time is maximized? b. Is there a schedule for regular time to meet? Step 1: Collect and Chart Data a. Is there a common assessment used, Or are common learning targets being examined for achievement? Step 2: Analyze student work specific to the data a. Does the team do an item analysis? b. Do they review multiple data sources?
  48. 49. Teacher-Based Team Viewing Guide <ul><li>As you watch the clip, make “What Do You See” notes for the first two rows: </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Step 1 </li></ul>
  49. 51. <ul><li>Complete the “Compare/Contrast” Column </li></ul><ul><li>for the Collaboration and Step 1 rows </li></ul><ul><li>on your viewing guide. </li></ul>
  50. 52. Now It Is Your Turn to Practice the Process <ul><li>Data provided is from a 4 th grade language arts end-of- unit assessment </li></ul><ul><li>There are a total of 57 questions on the assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Criteria for Grouping </li></ul><ul><ul><li>49 correct and above = Advanced (85% and >) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>40-48 = Benchmarked (70%-85%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>32-39 = Targeted (55%-69%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>31 and < = Intensive </li></ul></ul>
  51. 54. HO 5.1
  52. 55. Criteria for Grouping <ul><ul><li>49 correct and above = Advanced (85% and >) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>40-48 = Benchmarked (70%-85%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>32-39 = Targeted (55%-69%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>31 and < = Intensive </li></ul></ul>for this simulation
  53. 56. Subgroups <ul><li>This district has asked each building to intentionally monitor the academic progress of their SWDs. The building does not have SWD as an AYP subgroup. </li></ul><ul><li>Mark the following students as SWD on your Template: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seale, Elijah </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pitcher, Cary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pinkney, Domingo </li></ul></ul>
  54. 57. Step 2 <ul><li>Analyze student work </li></ul><ul><li>specific to the data </li></ul>As you watch the clip, make notes in the Step 2 Row, “What Do You See” Column
  55. 59. <ul><li>Complete the “Compare/Contrast” Column </li></ul><ul><li>for the Step 2 Row </li></ul><ul><li>on your viewing guide. </li></ul>
  56. 60. .
  57. 61. <ul><li>Establish shared expectations for implementing specific effective changes in the classroom. </li></ul>Step 3 As you watch the clip, use Handout 4.3 to make notes about the strategies the TBT uses.
  58. 63. HO 4.3
  59. 64. <ul><li>Implement changes consistently across all classrooms </li></ul>Step 4
  60. 65. <ul><li>Collect, Chart and Analyze </li></ul><ul><li>Post-Assessment Data </li></ul>Step 5 The 4 th Grade Independence TBT ran their intervention/enrichment cycle and presented their pre-post assessment data at their monthly BLT meeting.
  61. 67. Evaluate
  62. 68. Ohio 5-Step TBT Process Inventory and Facilitation Next Steps Ohio TBT 5-Step Process Implementation Rubric Resource 21 TOOLS

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