Influencing Instructional Partnerships in Universities:
Schools of Library and Information Science and Colleges
of Educati...
Entrepreneurial – leadership, willingness
To be entrepreneurial requires leadership and
innovation to bring about a new ve...
Social and Political Venture
Venture
develop new university instructional partnerships

Resolve Problem
nationwide de-prof...
Entrepreneurial


The Premise: If collaboration is to move beyond
cooperation to instructional partnerships,
there must b...
Entrepreneurial


Best Educational Practice: “For American
students, state-licensed school librarians
represent a necessi...
Entrepreneurial

Mature
Organization
Perceived
Opportunity

• University Colleges of Education and
Schools of Library and ...
University Instructional Partnerships
Large Scale Change in Education Curriculum


Creation of new curriculum across lice...
University Instructional Partnerships
Large Scale Change in University
Teaching Assignments


Library school faculty teac...
University Instructional Partnerships
Large Scale Change in University Budgets


University provision for deans and progr...
University Instructional Partnership Study
From Fall 2008 to Spring 2010 (4 semesters), a new, university-approved
require...
Findings, Emporia State University Instructional Partnership Study
(n=409)
In 4 of 4 semesters, the number of respondents ...
Findings, Emporia State University Faculty Partnership Study
(n=409)


In 3 of 4 semesters, the number of respondents sel...
Findings, Emporia State University Instructional Partnership Study
(n=409)



In 4 of 4 semesters, the number of responde...
Conclusions
On the basis of this Emporia State University study, a university-based
elementary education (K-6) course taug...
University
Instructional
Partnerships
(schools and libraries)

Shared Faculty
Responsibility for Teaching
Across Content A...
University Partnerships
Until university education faculty partnerships
become the norm,


subject area teachers and scho...
Comments ?

Questions ?
References
Achterman, D. L. (2008). Haves, halves, and have-nots: School libraries
and student achievement in California. ...
Dow, M. J. (Ed.). (2013). School libraries matter: Views from the research.
Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited.
Dow, M...
Haycock, K. (2010). Leadership from the middle: Building influence for
change. In S. Coatney (Ed.), The many faces of scho...
Lance, K. C., Rodney, M. C., & Schwarz, B. (2010). The impact of school
libraries on academic achievement: A research stud...
Moreillon, J. (2012). Coteaching reading comprehension strategies in
secondary school libraries: Maximizing your impact. C...
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Influencing Instructional Partnerships in Universities: Schools of Library and Information Science and Colleges of Education

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Dow Presention at 2014 Association for Library and Information Science Education, Philadephia, Pa January 21-24, 2014. Special Interest Group (SIG) Program: School Libraries

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Influencing Instructional Partnerships in Universities: Schools of Library and Information Science and Colleges of Education

  1. 1. Influencing Instructional Partnerships in Universities: Schools of Library and Information Science and Colleges of Education Mirah J. Dow, Associate Professor 2014 Association for Library and Information Science Education, Philadelphia, PA January 21-24, 2014 presentation available on slideshare
  2. 2. Entrepreneurial – leadership, willingness To be entrepreneurial requires leadership and innovation to bring about a new venture, obtain the required resources, and the willingness to accept whatever happens—good or bad. Two venture categories:  Business ventures designed to make more money  Social or political ventures based on a perceived opportunities to resolve problems
  3. 3. Social and Political Venture Venture develop new university instructional partnerships Resolve Problem nationwide de-professionalization and elimination of school librarians Opportunity Increased national emphasis of college and career readiness and integration of information and technology literacy into every content area calls for more school librarian involvement at the university level.
  4. 4. Entrepreneurial  The Premise: If collaboration is to move beyond cooperation to instructional partnerships, there must be increased engagement by colleges of education and schools of library and information science in large scale change that provides pre-service educators with experiences in collaboration. (Patricia Montiel-Overall, 2005).
  5. 5. Entrepreneurial  Best Educational Practice: “For American students, state-licensed school librarians represent a necessity if this country is to move forward with the educational goal to graduate all students prepared for college, jobs, and/or careers.” (Mirah Dow, 2013)
  6. 6. Entrepreneurial Mature Organization Perceived Opportunity • University Colleges of Education and Schools of Library and Information Science • Large Scale Change in Curriculum, Teaching Assignments, Budgets
  7. 7. University Instructional Partnerships Large Scale Change in Education Curriculum  Creation of new curriculum across licensure programs that will bring subject area content into library science curriculum and library science into subject area content  Shared faculty responsibilities for standards-based learning outcomes  Co-partnering in developing and delivery of instruction and assessment of student learning  Addition of a new content area: Information Science and Technology (information in all formats; information cycle; interdisciplinary field, Taylor, 1966) Dow, M. J. (2010). School library leadership at the university level. School Library Monthly, 27(3), 36-38.
  8. 8. University Instructional Partnerships Large Scale Change in University Teaching Assignments  Library school faculty teaching in elementary and secondary education degree programs  Elementary and secondary education degree faculty teaching in library schools  New considerations for faculty teaching loads  Cross-listing of courses in university catalogs
  9. 9. University Instructional Partnerships Large Scale Change in University Budgets  University provision for deans and program directors to hire and pay faculty outside their own departments  New, permanent line items in departmental budgets to support faculty in addition to those full-time positions identified by state legislatures
  10. 10. University Instructional Partnership Study From Fall 2008 to Spring 2010 (4 semesters), a new, university-approved required course was offered for all elementary education students at The Teachers College, Emporia State University.  The Elementary Teacher and the School Library Media Specialist: Partners in Teaching Literature Appreciation and Information Literacy, 1 credit hour  Pre-service elementary education (K-6) teachers taught by library school faculty (3 different faculty; all experienced school librarians)  Required text for course was Collaborative Strategies for Teaching Reading Comprehension: Maximizing Your Impact (Moreillon, 2007)  Pre- and Post-survey (12 Likert items, Moreillon, 2008) of enrolled students to answer the research question: ―Are elementary education majors’ perceptions of school librarians as partners in teaching changed through a 1-credit hour course taught by library school faculty?‖
  11. 11. Findings, Emporia State University Instructional Partnership Study (n=409) In 4 of 4 semesters, the number of respondents selecting agree or strongly agree slightly increased from pre- to post-survey for theses statements: School librarians should be responsible for teaching reading. every area of the school curriculum. helping classroom teachers design and plan lessons and units of instruction. helping classroom teachers co-teach lessons and units of instruction. assessing students’ learning on projects in which they have taught some or many components.
  12. 12. Findings, Emporia State University Faculty Partnership Study (n=409)  In 3 of 4 semesters, the number of respondents selecting agree or strongly agree slightly decreased from pre- to post-survey for the statements: ♦ School librarians should be responsible for helping classroom teachers find materials. ♦ School library media programs should be a critical part of the literacy program of the school. ♦ School principles should set the expectation for classroom-library collaboration. ♦ When school librarians and classroom teachers collaborate for instruction, student achievement should increase.
  13. 13. Findings, Emporia State University Instructional Partnership Study (n=409)  In 4 of 4 semesters, the number of respondents in the post-survey who agreed or strongly agreed with each statement (12) was above 50 percent of the total valid responses. fall 2008 44/69 (64%) valid responses spring 2009 56/97 (58%) valid responses fall 2009 57/88 (65%) valid responses spring 2010 45/82 (55%) valid responses
  14. 14. Conclusions On the basis of this Emporia State University study, a university-based elementary education (K-6) course taught by library school faculty that focuses co-teaching strategies for classroom teachers and school librarians can improve perceptions about the school library media program and school librarians’ involvement in preparing all students for jobs, college, and careers. This course is a model for moving beyond collaboration to cooperation in instructional partnerships and has the potential to influence today’s education establishment and the public about the necessity of statelicensed school librarians in every school building. Dow, M. J., Davis, T., & Vietti-Okane, A. (2013). Influencing instructional partnerships in pre-service elementary education teachers. In M. J. Dow (Ed.), School Libraries Matter: Views From the Research. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited.
  15. 15. University Instructional Partnerships (schools and libraries) Shared Faculty Responsibility for Teaching Across Content Areas and Standards New Assessed Content Area “Information Science and Technology” University Provision for Budgetary Investment in University-based Instructional Partnerships University Provision for Faculty Teaching Assignments Across Departments and Programs
  16. 16. University Partnerships Until university education faculty partnerships become the norm,  subject area teachers and school administrators are likely to continue to view school librarians as support staff.  information science and technology will not become a recognized content area along with assessed (Annual Yearly Progress) content areas: reading, science, mathematics, social studies, and government.  there will be little proof of school librarians’ effect on student achievement in the area of information and technology literacy.  educational policy makers and the public are not likely to recognize the need, or demand funding for state-licensed K-12 school librarians.
  17. 17. Comments ? Questions ?
  18. 18. References Achterman, D. L. (2008). Haves, halves, and have-nots: School libraries and student achievement in California. Denton, Texas. UNT Digital Library. Retrieved from, http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc9800/m1/ Church, A. (2008). The instructional role of the library media specialist as perceived by elementary school principals. School Library Media Research, 11. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/aasl/aaslpubsandjournals/slmrb/slmrcontents/volu me11/church Common Core State Standards Initiative. (2010). Common core state standards (CCSS) Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/thestandards Dow, M. J. (Ed.). (2013). School libraries matter: Views from the research. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited.
  19. 19. Dow, M. J. (Ed.). (2013). School libraries matter: Views from the research. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited. Dow, M. J., (2013). Effective use of first principles of instruction. School Library Monthly, 29(8), 8-10. Dow, M. J., Davis, T., & Vietti-Okane, A. (2013). Influencing instructional partnerships in pre-service elementary education teachers. In M. J. Dow (Ed.), School Libraries Matter: Views From the Research. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited. Dow, M. J., Lakin, J. M., & Court, S. C. (2012). School librarian staffing levels and student achievement as represented in 2006-09 Kansas Annual Yearly Progress data. School Library Research, 15. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/aasl/slr. Dow, M. J. (2010). School library leadership at the university level. School Library Monthly, 27(3), 36-38. Dow, M. J. (2010). School librarians teach subject area 10: Computer and information sciences. School Library Monthly, 27(2), 5-8. Dow, M. J. (2010). Making schools better: School librarians’ roles in aggressive reforms—What is our official position? Knowledge Quest, 38(5), 78-82.
  20. 20. Haycock, K. (2010). Leadership from the middle: Building influence for change. In S. Coatney (Ed.), The many faces of school library leadership (pp. 1-12). Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited. Immroth, B., & Lukenbill, W. B. (2007). Teacher-school library media specialist collaboration through social marketing strategies: An information behavior study. School Library Media Research, 10. Retrieved fromhttp://www.ala.org/aasl/aaslpubsandjournals/slmrb/slmrcontents/ volume10/immroth_teacherslmscollaboration Kachel, D. E. (2011). School library research summarized: A graduate class project. Mansfield, PA: School of Library & Information Technologies Department, Mansfield University.Retrieved from http://libweb.mansfield.edu/upload/kachel/ImpactStudy.pdf Kimmel, S. C. (2012). Collaboration as school reform: Are there patterns in the chaos of planning with teachers? School Library Research,15. Retrieved fromhttp://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/aaslpubsa ndjournals/slr/vol15/SLR_Collaboration_as_School_Reform_V15.pdf
  21. 21. Lance, K. C., Rodney, M. C., & Schwarz, B. (2010). The impact of school libraries on academic achievement: A research study based on responses from administrators in Idaho. School Library Monthly, 26(9), 14-17. Montiel-Overall, P. (2005). Toward a theory of collaboration for teachers and librarians. School Library Media Research, 8(1). Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/aasl/aaslpubsandjournals/slmrb/slmrcontents/volu me82005/theory Moreillon, J. (2007). Collaborative strategies for teaching reading comprehension: Maximizing your impact. Chicago: ALA Editions. Moreillon, J. (2008). Two heads are better than one: The factors influencing the understanding and practice of classroom-library collaboration, 11. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/aasl/aaslpubsandjournals/slmrb/slmrcontents/volu me11/moreillon
  22. 22. Moreillon, J. (2012). Coteaching reading comprehension strategies in secondary school libraries: Maximizing your impact. Chicago: ALA Editions. Pickard, P. W. (1993). The instructional consultant role of the school library media specialist. School Library Media Quarterly, 21(2), 115–121. Subramaniam, M., Oxley, R., & Kodama, C. (2012). School librarians as ambassadors of inclusive information access for students with disabilities. School Library Research, 16. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/aaslpubsandjourn als/slr/vol16/SLR_SchoolLibrariansasAmbassadorsofInclusiveInformationAcc ess_V16.pdf Taylor, R. S. (1966). Professional aspects of information science and technology. In C. A. Cuadra (Ed.), Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, Vol. 1 (pp. 15-40). New York: Wiley. Todd, R. (2011). "Look for me in the whirlwind": Actions, outcomes and evidence. Knowledge building in the learning commons: Moving from research to practice to close the achievement gap. Conference Proceedings of the Treasure Mountain Research Retreat #17 (34-50).Osseo, MN. Spring, TX: LMC Source.

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