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Rapid interven team.dom

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Rapid interven team.dom

  1. 1. Fairfax County Fire & Rescue Department Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008
  2. 2. Table of Contents I. Background and History……………………………………………............... Page 2 II. Capabilities, Features, and Component Overview…………….………………Page 3 III. Daily Check and Maintenance…………………….…………………………. Page 8 IV. Decontamination………………………………………………………………Page 9 V. RIT Air Pack Loaner Policy……………………………….……….…………Page 9 VI. RIT Operations………………………………………………………………..Page 10 A. Operations Bureau RIT Air Pack Locations…………………………….Page 10 B. Training Division RIT Air Packs………….………………………........ Page 10 C. SCBA Air Shop RIT Air Packs……….……..…………………….........Page 10 D. Level 1 RIT…………………………………………………………….. Page 10 1. Utilizing the Accessory Hose………………………………………. Page 12 2. Changing Out a Low RIT Air Pack Cylinder ….………...................Page 13 3. Downed Firefighter Removal………………………………….........Page 14 E. Levels 2 and 3 RIT…………………………........................................... Page 15 1. Supplied Air Operations………………………………...…………..Page 15 2. Utilizing Air Hose From Vehicle Mounted Cascade Systems ……..Page 16 3. In-line Air Manifold Operations……………………………….........Page 18 Dedication Dedicated to the bravest who have fought so many fires before us. Some have perished performing heroic acts while others have perished due to a lack of innovation in modern life saving equipment. These thoughts weighed heavily on the minds of those who developed the Fairfax RIT air pack and training manual. It is with high hopes that this equipment will never have to be utilized, except in training, but with the knowledge that it will save our own, should the need arise.
  3. 3. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 2 I. Background and History RIT air packs are designed to be deployed by a Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) and “buy time” with a resupply of breathing air until a lost or trapped firefighter can be removed from the IDLH environment. Many air pack manufacturers have developed RIT air packs, yet they have not fully taken into account the full scope of the needs of the fire service. During extensive training and research many shortcomings were discovered with the Scott RIT air pack. With support from personnel from Fire and Rescue Station 18, A-Shift, the SCBA Air Shop designed and developed a new RIT air pack that addresses many of the shortcomings found with the previous Scott RIT air pack. Many of the concepts were crossover ideas pulled from both firefighting and confined space operations. The Fairfax RIT air pack has features that are not found on any other single RIT air pack on the market today. The Fairfax RIT air pack features reconfigured components from within the Scott line, and some improvements have been made in order to develop our own unique configuration. Accessory pouches, the shoulder sling assembly, and the accessory hose were sourced out to vendors for manufacture. Assembly and testing occurred at the SCBA Air Shop with assistance from field personnel. Several prototypes were developed and then were distributed to all rescue companies for evaluation and input. Presentations and demonstrations were made to senior operations and senior staff. After four and a half years of laboratory and field testing, the Fairfax RIT air pack is ready for service. Throughout this manual, this air pack will be referred to as the “RIT pack.” RIT packs will be assigned to all Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department (FRD) Rescue Squads, Tower Ladder, and Truck companies, as well as the Safety Officer’s vehicle. This will effectively increase the number of RIT packs available on scene. The Fire and Rescue Academy and SCBA Air Shop will also be issued RIT packs. All Rescue Squads which currently do not have in-line air manifolds will have them issued to utilize as a supplemental air source for RIT pack operations.
  4. 4. II. Capabilities, Features, and Component Overview _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 3 RIT Pack with 60min Air Cylinder and 42” EBSS Hose SCBA Mask/Regulator EBSS Adapter 14’ Accessory Hose A. The RIT pack may be utilized in a variety of IDLH environments such as fires, structural collapse during a fire, and confined space operations. It is based on the Scott 4.5 SCBA and utilizes its pressure reducer and a similar frame. Each RIT pack contains a 60-minute air cylinder. B. Providing an uninterrupted air supply was one of the primary considerations in the development of the RIT pack. The pack’s functionality was intentionally designed to be simplistic. The RIT pack is capable of supplying breathing air to one or more firefighters in extreme situations. Scott Health and Safety states that the regulator is capable of flowing in excess of 500 liters of air per minute. This exceeds the required airflow for four firefighters whose facepieces are leaking. C. Our initial tests have shown that two working firefighters, each connected to 300 feet of hose had enough air for 20 minutes before the single one-hour cylinder supply was exhausted. Bench tests have consistently produced 82+ liters of air per minute at the facepiece. This exceeds the required air flow for two working firefighters. D. All air, after the frame mounted reducer, is low pressure (approximately 100 pounds per square inch [psi]), making it extremely safe. E. The RIT pack has an audible, low-air pressure warning alarm to alert the Rapid Intervention Team when it is time to change out the air cylinder. A luminescent pressure gauge gives an accurate indication of air supply status. The alarm will also activate if there is a reducer malfunction. When the pressure gauge does not correspond correctly with the audible low air warning alarm, it is an indication there is a reducer or gauge malfunction. If this occurs, immediately disconnect the malfunctioning pack and use an alternative air supply.
  5. 5. F. A hook and loop fastener has been provided next to the carry handle for placement of a unit identifier. G. The pack has several connection points, which enable low-pressure air to flow in any direction, either to a firefighter or from another air source. Virtually any combination of connections will successfully supply air to the firefighter in distress. There are both male and female connection points to allow for the most versatility. None of the connection points (including male connections) will lose or flow air until they are connected. These features eliminate the possibility of incorrectly connecting the RIT pack. H. If an extended operation is anticipated, the pack is capable of receiving supplemental air from a number of sources: 1. Regulated breathing air found on many fire department vehicle cascade systems 2. In-line air manifold systems typically utilized for confined space operations _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 4
  6. 6. 3. The Emergency Breathing Support System (EBSS) from a full SCBA I. Supplemental breathing air from the EBSS of another full SCBA, a vehicle mounted cascade system, or an in-line air manifold system is required to facilitate low air cylinder replacement of the RIT pack without interrupting the air supply. J. A spare facepiece and regulator are provided in case the firefighter in distress has experienced a failure. K. The primary and accessory pouches attached to the RIT pack allow for compact storage and ease of access to hoses and connection points. The pouches were intentionally designed to be large enough to carry only the equipment provided. Additionally, the saddlebag-style pouches are configured to facilitate quick cylinder replacements, if required. The primary and accessory pouch access points are identified by the color yellow. The primary (small) pouch (which must be accessed for all operations) has a large yellow loop handle for ease in locating and opening with gloved hands in a low visibility environment. The large accessory pouch utilizes zippers with large zipper pulls that have yellow heat resistant plastic balls on the ends (again, for ease in opening with gloved hands in a low visibility environment). A bag is attached which contains a facepiece and regulator in case the lost or trapped firefighter has a facepiece or regulator _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 5
  7. 7. malfunction or failure. The facepiece bag is easily opened by pulling down on the two fire retardant hook and loop fastener tabs. L. The accessory bag contains a 14-foot accessory hose that allows the RIT pack to be removed from the immediate area of the downed firefighter(s). The 14-foot hose also may be utilized to reach down one floor level in the event a firefighter has fallen through a floor or roof. The firefighter who has fallen may connect the hose to their SCBA to maintain their air supply until help arrives. The accessory hose may also be utilized to connect one RIT pack to two distressed firefighters that are up to 20’ from one another (when used in conjunction with the Scott SCBA EBSS). M. The accessory bag also contains an EBSS adapter that allows for a supplied air hose to connect to the RIT pack for supplemental air supply during extended operations. A low pressure check valve prevents air free-flow. (The EBSS adapter shall only be used by trained Rescue Squad or Tower Ladder companies). _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 6
  8. 8. N. The RIT pack has multiple carry methods. There is a carry handle for suitcase style carry. The carry handle also allows one to slide the pack on the frame mounted skids when crawling in IDLH environments. There is also a durable, fire resistant, adjustable Kevlar shoulder sling for portability. The shoulder sling is a quick attach style and may also be utilized to attach the RIT pack to the downed firefighter, simplifying removal from the structure. O. A manually operated intrinsically safe Lite Tracker light-emitting diode (L.E.D.) strobe light has been added for ease in locating the RIT pack, once it has been deployed. It requires two (2) AAA alkaline batteries for operation. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 7
  9. 9. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 8 III. Daily Check and Maintenance A daily check shall be performed on the RIT pack each morning. A. Begin by looking at the air cylinder gauge. Make certain there is no less than 4000 psi in the air cylinder. Anything less requires immediate filling. Optimally, there should be 4500 psi registering on the cylinder gauge. B. Closely inspect the cylinder, frame, hoses, sling, pouches, facepiece, regulator, and accessories. If anything is cracked, worn, missing, or otherwise damaged, immediately place the RIT pack out of service. If a replacement is required, a loaner may be obtained from the Air Shop during regular hours or the Safety Officer after hours. C. Remove the RIT pack’s facepiece and regulator from the facepiece bag. Examine it to ensure that it has no cracked, worn, or missing parts. Connect the facepiece and regulator to either the female connection point on the 6-inch hose on the bottom of the pressure reducer or the female connection point on the EBSS, which is located at the end of the 42-inch hose coming from the top of the pressure reducer. Ensure the purge valve is closed and the air saver switch is activated. D. Turn the RIT pack air cylinder knob on (clockwise). E. You should momentarily hear the Vibra-Alert on the facepiece regulator and the low air pressure alarm. The large luminescent gauge should now correspond with the air cylinder gauge. Ensure there are no air leaks. F. Slowly and briefly, open the purge valve on the facepiece regulator to ensure it functions properly. Then close it. G. Momentarily pull the collar back on the male connection point on the EBSS. Ensure that air flows freely. Release the collar and ensure that the spring-loaded collar returns to a position so that air does not escape. H. Turn the RIT pack air cylinder knob off (counter clockwise). I. Put the facepiece on and slowly breathe down the air, paying attention to the large luminescent gauge and listening for the low air pressure alarm and Vibra-Alert. This alarm and alert should activate when approximately ¼ of the cylinder’s volume of air remains. Continue to breathe down the air until there is no pressure on the facepiece and regulator. J. Disconnect the facepiece and regulator and return them to the facepiece bag. K. Once the daily check is complete, mark the appropriate boxes and sign the corresponding SCBA check sheet (FRD-036) found in the vehicle log book.
  10. 10. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 9 L. The only field maintenance that may be performed is filling the air cylinder, cleaning the pack, and replacing the two (2) AAA batteries in the strobe light. 1. Clean the pack, per the instructions for cleaning SCBA, which are located on the department’s Intranet under Services – Personal Protective Equipment – Air Shop. 2. To change the AAA batteries in the strobe light, use a #1 Phillips screw driver and loosen the screw on the end opposite the on/off switch. Note that the screw does not come out of the housing. Gently pull the switch end from the housing to expose the batteries. Use care when removing the batteries so the springs do not get damaged. There are directional arrows indicating the proper battery position. Carefully reinsert the battery section into the outer housing, taking care not to damage the rubber seal around the edge. Do not over tighten the screw or it may crack the housing. The strobe light is an intrinsically safe device. Properly following the maintenance tips will help to preserve the device’s integrity. IV. Decontamination Decontamination should be performed in the field or at the station. Use a mild soap and water to clean the pouches, sling, and exterior components of the RIT pack. DO NOT USE BLEACH OR OTHER HARSH CLEANERS ON ANY PART OR COMPONENT OF THE RIT PACK! AIR DRY OR TOWEL DRY ONLY! DO NOT PLACE ANY PARTS OR COMPONENTS IN A CLOTHES DRYER! The facepiece and regulator are to be cleaned in the same manner as your SCBA facepiece and regulator. V. RIT Air Pack Loaner Policy If a RIT pack is required to be sent in for repair or maintenance, it must be sent to the SCBA Air Shop. During business hours, if a replacement is required, a loaner may be obtained from the SCBA Air Shop. After business hours, the duty Safety Officer’s RIT pack will serve as a loaner. The Safety Officer shall replace the RIT pack loaned from their vehicle, with a loaner from the SCBA Air Shop, as soon as the shop is open. If required, emergency after-hours arrangements for a loaner RIT pack can be made by having DPSC notify the Duty Logistics Officer.
  11. 11. VI. RIT Operations A. Operations Bureau RIT Air Pack Locations The RIT pack can be found on all front-line Fairfax County FRD Rescue Squad, Tower Ladder, and Truck companies, as well as Safety Officers’ vehicles. Battalion chiefs will no longer carry a RIT air pack. This effectively gives us a 30% increase in the number of RIT packs in the field. Instead of having two RIT packs on the scene of a first alarm assignment, now there will be a minimum of three. Apparatus compartments containing the RIT pack may differ and will be designated with a 4-inch by 4-inch decal (shown below). This decal will aid companies in rapidly locating the RIT pack. B. Training Division RIT Air Packs The Fire and Rescue Academy shall be issued RIT packs for training recruit firefighters. C. SCBA Air Shop RIT Air Packs The SCBA Air Shop will normally have several RIT packs on hand for use as loaners. These loaners are designated for replacement of RIT packs in need of repair or requiring maintenance. D. Level 1 RIT Companies assigned RIT duties should follow the procedures set forth in the Northern Virginia RIT Command and Operational Procedures Manual. Once a company has been assigned as the Rapid Intervention Team, one of the required duties is to locate and obtain a RIT pack. As previously stated, these are located on all front-line Fairfax County FRD Rescue Squads, Tower Ladder, and Truck companies and the compartment they are located in is designated with a 4-inch by 4-inch decal. It is wise to perform a quick field check of the RIT pack. Rapidly, familiarize yourself with the components and operation. Ensure the cylinder is full and no components or accessories are missing or damaged. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 10 Once the Rapid Intervention Team is deployed and the distressed firefighter(s) has been located, immediately determine the status of their air supply. If there is
  12. 12. not enough air remaining to remove the distressed firefighter from the IDLH atmosphere, or if they are entrapped, the RIT pack should be utilized: a. Turn the RIT pack air cylinder knob on (clockwise). b. Grasp the yellow loop handle on the small primary pouch and lift up. Remember, the primary pouch is located between the low air warning alarm bell and the pressure reducer. c. Remove the 42-inch hose with the EBSS from the primary pouch. d. Remove the distressed firefighter’s EBSS from their waist strap mounted pouch. e. Connect the RIT pack EBSS to the distressed firefighter’s EBSS. Do this by aligning and pushing the male connection point of one EBSS to the female connection point of the other EBSS. They will click when connected. There are only two possible combinations for connecting two EBSSs and either works equally well. There will always be at least one open connection point, either on the RIT pack EBSS or the distressed firefighter’s EBSS. This is an important point to remember. f. Should another firefighter require emergency air, they can be connected to one of the open connection points on the EBSS. Connecting two downed firefighters to one RIT pack should only be done in extreme circumstances and an immediate _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 11
  13. 13. request for another RIT pack and/or a supplied air line should be made. g. Turn off the distressed firefighter’s SCBA cylinder and PASS alarm. Any remaining air may serve as an emergency or escape air supply. Bleed off the EBSS by depressing the collar until the large luminescent pressure gauge reads zero (0) psi. This procedure will allow for the PASS alarm to be silenced. Leaving the distressed firefighter’s cylinder on will only deplete the remaining air in their cylinder because both cylinders will breathe down simultaneously. h. Activate the blue Lite Tracker strobe light by depressing and holding the button on the side. Holding it for two (2) seconds will activate the flash mode. The blue strobe in the flash mode indicates the RIT pack is in use and assists in identifying its location. 1. Utilizing the Accessory Hose The accessory hose is 14 feet in length and has a female connection point at one end and an EBSS connection point at the other end. The 14-foot accessory hose serves several purposes. If a firefighter has fallen through a floor or roof, the hose can be lowered to connect to their EBSS. In the event that quarters are close, the accessory hose serves to extend the air supply so that the RIT pack may be placed distant from the distressed firefighter. This allows additional room for the Rapid Intervention Team to extricate the firefighter. Lastly, the accessory hose serves to connect two firefighters distant from one another. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 12
  14. 14. 2. Changing Out a Low RIT Pack Cylinder during RIT Operations a. The rescuer must connect the EBSS from their SCBA to any one of the three connections points which are unused on the RIT pack or any open connection point on the victim’s EBSS. b. Turn the RIT pack cylinder knob off (counter clockwise). Do not be alarmed if you hear a Vibra-Alert activating. This will occur when bypassing the pressure reducer on the RIT pack and does not affect air flow. Bleed off the residual air by depressing the collar on the male connection point on the EBSS. This step is mandatory in order to release the pressure from the high pressure cylinder connection and to avoid damaging the O-ring. Verification of successful residual bleed-off is accomplished by checking the large luminescent pressure gauge. It will read zero (0) psi once all pressure has been relieved. c. Release the hook and loop fastener retention straps and exchange the cylinder with a full one, just as you would a Scott 4.5. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 13
  15. 15. d. Turn the RIT pack cylinder knob on (clockwise). Reattach the hook and loop fastener retention straps. Successful cylinder change-out is complete. The rescuer should now disconnect their EBSS from the RIT pack. 3. Downed Firefighter Removal There are several methods to maintaining an air supply while removing a downed firefighter. a. Utilizing remaining SCBA air, as an escape pack: This method may apply during removal from the structure after disentanglement from an entrapment scenario. If the RIT pack was connected before the firefighter had a chance to breathe down much air and their SCBA was turned off early in the event, their own SCBA may serve as an escape pack. Once freed, ensure there is enough air remaining in their SCBA to remove them safely from the structure. If adequate air remains, turn their SCBA back on and then disconnect the RIT pack. b. Removing the firefighter with a RIT pack: If there is insufficient air left in the downed firefighter’s SCBA to remove them from the structure after disentanglement, the RIT pack should be physically attached to the downed firefighter. This is accomplished by detaching the RIT pack shoulder sling from one end of the frame, looping it around the firefighter, and reattaching it to the RIT pack frame. It is crucial to attach the RIT pack when removing the firefighter in order to smoothly accomplish a coordinated removal. c. Buddy breathing option: If there is adequate air in the Rapid Intervention Team member’s SCBA, they may choose to buddy breath with the downed firefighter during physical removal from the structure. This method allows the RIT pack to be disconnected after disentanglement while still maintaining an auxiliary air supply. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 14
  16. 16. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 15 E. Levels 2 & 3 RIT Level 2 RIT is generally implemented in order to be proactive for any structure that has a high likelihood of utilizing RIT resources. Most structure fires involving large commercial occupancies, industrial sites, high-rise fires, and situations deemed appropriate by command staff generally require a Level 2 RIT dispatched to the scene. These incidents have a high possibility of firefighters getting lost or disoriented due to the size of the structure, building contents, or building layout. Level 3 RIT is implemented when a collapse or structural failure has occurred entrapping firefighters. Level 3 RIT is generally considered a reactive measure. Both situations require a rapid, highly coordinated, and efficient RIT response in order to have a successful outcome. There is a high likelihood, in both situations, that a sustained or prolonged air supply may be required for one or more firefighters. Levels 2 and 3 RIT commit additional resources to the RIT effort. Level 2 RIT includes, among other units, a Truck company and a Rescue Squad; each carries a RIT pack. Level 3 RIT includes two more Rescue Squads and each of them carries a RIT pack. With each RIT level upgrade, a minimum of two additional RIT packs will become available on the scene. 1. Supplied Air Operations Supplied air operations can be implemented during Level 2 or Level 3 RIT operations. Supplied air operations are designed to supplement the RIT pack after its initial deployment. a. If required, there are two methods to provide supplied air to a RIT pack: ƒ One method utilizes vehicle mounted cascade systems, which are found on Fairfax County FRD Tower Ladders, most Rescue Squads and Light & Air Units. All apparatus with cascade-fed low pressure air reels are equipped with National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) compliant breathing air hose. ƒ The second method utilizes an in-line air manifold system found on all Fairfax County FRD Rescue Squads. Supplied air operations shall be implemented and considered mandatory, immediately after deploying the RIT pack, if: • a RIT air pack is supplying more than one firefighter. • a RIT air pack is supplying a trapped firefighter(s). Establishing a continuous air supply in either of the above two situations should be considered an extremely high priority!
  17. 17. b. Supplied air operations from vehicle mounted cascade systems shall only be performed by trained Rescue Squad or Tower Ladder personnel. Personnel assigned to these units have been specifically trained in the use of supplied air operations from vehicle mounted cascade systems. c. Supplied air operations from in-line air manifold systems shall only be performed by trained Rescue Squad personnel. In-line air manifold operations are complex and Rescue Squad personnel are specifically trained on in-line air manifold/supplied air operations. In-line air manifold systems require a trained Rescue Squad member to staff and run the system at the manifold until conclusion of use. This is typically done from a safe area (such as a stairwell). 2. Utilizing Air Hose from Vehicle Mounted Cascade Systems All Fairfax County FRD Tower Ladders also have a cascade cylinder mounted to the side of the aerial. Two air connection points are available in the tower’s basket. All Tower Ladders are equipped with four 50-foot lengths of breathing air hose. Tower Ladders have the unique ability to provide air below grade or to elevated positions, such as the window or balcony of a high-rise. Due to the potential need for deployment of the Tower Ladder’s aerial or master streams, as well as the possibility of operating in any potential collapse zone, supplied air operations from Tower Ladders should be considered carefully. All Fairfax County FRD Rescue Squads have vehicle mounted cascade systems (except for R421 [V-#211] and R414 [V- #75]). These units have low pressure air reels that come directly off the cascade system. Likewise, Fairfax County FRD Light & Air Units also have low pressure air reels that offer breathing quality air. If these vehicles are positioned close _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 16
  18. 18. enough, they may be utilized to supplement air to the RIT pack during prolonged events requiring supplied air. a. Tower Ladders, Rescue Squads, and Light & Air Units ƒ Turn the air supply on at the control panel or at the cascade bottle(s). ƒ Set the pressure regulator to 110 psi. ƒ Tower Ladders - Stretch 50-foot lengths of breathing air hose (not to exceed 300 feet) from the air connection points in the Tower’s basket to the RIT pack location. ƒ Rescue Squads - An air tool whip hose that contains a check valve is attached to the end of the hose reel. The air tool whip hose must be utilized for all air tool operations. The check valve prevents tool oil from contaminating the breathing air hose. The air tool whip hose must be disconnected for supplied breathing air operations. Stretch the breathing air hose from the reel to the location of the RIT pack. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 17
  19. 19. ƒ Connect the EBSS adapter (found in the large accessory pouch on the RIT pack) to the end of the breathing air hose. The Hansen male connection point on the EBSS adapter should be connected to the female connection point on the end of the breathing air hose. Then attach either the male or female connection point on the EBSS adapter (whichever is applicable) to an open connection point on the RIT pack. The 6-inch hose, with the female connection point, coming from the bottom of the reducer on the RIT pack should be open and serves well for this purpose. If that connection has already been utilized, any unused connection point will suffice. ƒ Do not be alarmed if you hear a Vibra-Alert activating. This may occur when bypassing the pressure reducer on the RIT pack. If a cascade system is to be utilized for RIT air supply operations, it is imperative that the cascade be maintained to 3500 psi or greater, daily! Under no circumstances will a cascade system be utilized for any breathing air operation if the system is at or below 500 psi! 3. In-line Air Manifold Operations All Fairfax County FRD Rescue Squads carry in-line air manifolds along with several 50-foot lengths of breathing air hose. These are basically _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 18
  20. 20. portable air resupply stations and are designed to be utilized in lengthy air operations. In-line air manifold procedures are as follows: a. In-line manifolds have two hose whips that are to be attached to two SCBA cylinders. b. There are four female connection points for attaching breathing air hose. Any of the four may be utilized, one per RIT pack. Connect the hose(s) to the manifold. Do not exceed 300 feet in length. c. Connect the EBSS adapter (found in the large accessory pouch on the RIT pack) to the end of the breathing air hose. The Hansen male connection point on the EBSS adapter should be connected to the female connection point on the end of the breathing air hose. Then connect either the male or female connection point on the EBSS adapter (whichever is applicable) to an open connection point on the RIT pack. The 6-inch hose with the female connection point, coming from the bottom of the pressure reducer on the RIT pack, should be open and serves well for this purpose. If that connection point has already been utilized, any unused connection point will suffice. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 19
  21. 21. d. Turn only one SCBA cylinder on to supply the manifold. (The other cylinder is only to be turned on when the first bottle reaches 1000 psi.) e. Set the in-line manifold regulator pressure to 110 psi. f. Turn the RIT pack cylinder knob off (counter clockwise). Do not be alarmed if you hear a Vibra-Alert activating. This may occur when bypassing the pressure reducer on the RIT pack and does not affect air flow. g. Monitor the open SCBA cylinder attached to the in-line air manifold. Remember the other SCBA cylinder is only to be turned on when the first bottle reaches 1000 psi. h. When the first cylinder reaches 1000 psi, turn on the second SCBA cylinder and turn off the first one. i. Bleed off the residual pressure with the bleeder valve on the SCBA hose whip. When pressure is bled off completely, close the bleeder valve. j. Replace the empty SCBA cylinder with a full cylinder. Continue this cycle of procedures until the event is concluded. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Air Pack Operations Manual March 2008 Operations Bureau Page 20

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