<ul><li>media industries / media production </li></ul><ul><li>each year: more media owned by less corporations </li></ul><...
 
horizontal and vertical integration
 
 
the hourglass structure of the media industries
hourglass example: videogames
hourglass example: music
hourglass example: advertising
why care about media ownership? the berlusconi, baywatch, and global production networks effects
berlusconi effect: media ownership equals political power
media power and political power: the case of Rupert Murdoch
 
media power and political power: the case of Bertelsmann
 
 
 
baywatch effect: concentration of media ownership equals lowest common denominator content
baywatch effect and globalization
gpn effect: media conglomeration means all production is global, all labor is local
 
global production networks and media industries
“ The plan is to build a global digital ad network that uses offshore labor to create thousands of versions of ads […] Pub...
runaway production
 
60% of game studios outsource production: “ it's no longer necessary or efficient to develop games entirely in one location”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
videogame localization
remote control journalism
precarity in media work 2006
2007
2008
so what it is like to work in the media today?
typical media workspaces: advertising
typical media workspaces: television news
typical media workspaces: tv entertainment
typical media workspaces: computer and video games
WETA: “formal Fridays”
 
 
 
work in the media as “playbor”
media production = production of culture technology laws & regulations organizations careers markets
technology: to empower or enslave?
law & regulation: constraint or enabling?
organization: firms or networks?
careers: soloist or superstar DJ?
how media workers make decisions: editorial logic
how media workers make decisions: market logic
today: convergence culture logic?
media professionals as fans
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Media Industries and Production

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Media Life is a course intended for undergraduate students across campus. Its goal is to make people aware of the role that media play in their everyday life. The key to understanding a "media life" is to see our lives not as lived WITH media (which would lead to a focus on media effects and media-centric theories of society), but rather IN media (where the distinction between what we do with and without media dissolves).

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Media Industries and Production

  1. 1. <ul><li>media industries / media production </li></ul><ul><li>each year: more media owned by less corporations </li></ul><ul><li>recently: a parallel process of media deconcentration </li></ul><ul><li>berlusconi effect: media ownership equals political power </li></ul><ul><li>baywatch effect: media concentration equals lowest common denominator content </li></ul><ul><li>globalization of production equals outsourcing </li></ul><ul><li>media production: the precarious balance between Content, Connectivity, Creativity, and Commerce (4C) </li></ul>
  2. 3. horizontal and vertical integration
  3. 6. the hourglass structure of the media industries
  4. 7. hourglass example: videogames
  5. 8. hourglass example: music
  6. 9. hourglass example: advertising
  7. 10. why care about media ownership? the berlusconi, baywatch, and global production networks effects
  8. 11. berlusconi effect: media ownership equals political power
  9. 12. media power and political power: the case of Rupert Murdoch
  10. 14. media power and political power: the case of Bertelsmann
  11. 18. baywatch effect: concentration of media ownership equals lowest common denominator content
  12. 19. baywatch effect and globalization
  13. 20. gpn effect: media conglomeration means all production is global, all labor is local
  14. 22. global production networks and media industries
  15. 23. “ The plan is to build a global digital ad network that uses offshore labor to create thousands of versions of ads […] Publicis executives see [China, India, Russia and Brazil] as important sources of low-cost labor […] the Publicis Groupe will benefit from the global talent pool ”
  16. 24. runaway production
  17. 26. 60% of game studios outsource production: “ it's no longer necessary or efficient to develop games entirely in one location”
  18. 34. videogame localization
  19. 35. remote control journalism
  20. 36. precarity in media work 2006
  21. 37. 2007
  22. 38. 2008
  23. 39. so what it is like to work in the media today?
  24. 40. typical media workspaces: advertising
  25. 41. typical media workspaces: television news
  26. 42. typical media workspaces: tv entertainment
  27. 43. typical media workspaces: computer and video games
  28. 44. WETA: “formal Fridays”
  29. 48. work in the media as “playbor”
  30. 49. media production = production of culture technology laws & regulations organizations careers markets
  31. 50. technology: to empower or enslave?
  32. 51. law & regulation: constraint or enabling?
  33. 52. organization: firms or networks?
  34. 53. careers: soloist or superstar DJ?
  35. 54. how media workers make decisions: editorial logic
  36. 55. how media workers make decisions: market logic
  37. 56. today: convergence culture logic?
  38. 57. media professionals as fans

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