<ul><li>recap media control </li></ul><ul><li>one of the key “qualities” of media (next to: recording, storage, and access...
<ul><li>media access </li></ul><ul><li>general trends: </li></ul><ul><li>ongoing integration of computing, telecommunicati...
 
the black box fallacy
 
 
availability of technology
does not equal access
 
motivational access material  access usage access skills access
the gendered nature of internet use
 
 
 
 
access and race
access and class
access and place
expectations of media versus media access and use
 
the participation gap
is pervasiveness the same as importance?
“ with the dominance of the cell phone, a new metaphor is emerging for how we organize, find and use information [...] tha...
Jorge Luis Borges (1946) “ in that empire, the art of cartography attained such perfection that the map of a single provin...
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Media Access

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Media Life is a course intended for undergraduate students across campus. Its goal is to make people aware of the role that media play in their everyday life. The key to understanding a "media life" is to see our lives not as lived WITH media (which would lead to a focus on media effects and media-centric theories of society), but rather IN media (where the distinction between what we do with and without media dissolves).

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  • http://www.theonion.com/content/video/sony_releases_new_stupid_piece_of
  • the media industry&apos;s black box fallacy (BBF) - a concept referring to the tendency of many to see convergence exclusively in terms of the combination of different media functions within the same device, rather than at the very least additionally understanding its cultural component.
  • Visualization of wireless mesh network: cell, laptop, desktop, blackberry
  • UN Telecom Index 2003
  • Digital divide 2003
  • Based on Van Dijk 2005: “increasingly, all familiar social and cultural differences in society are reflected in computer and Internet use” (quote from the Van Dijk paper). example: older people and digital tv video
  • OII: Mean of entertainment by Gender
  • men: entertainment/sports
  • women: connectivity and information
  • internet as required knowledge/skill: Digital Conversion PSA: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DuiGJ8hUWLc
  • OLPC: http://www.laptop.org/en/index.shtml
  • http://civic.mit.edu/watchlistenlearn/old-and-new-media-converging-during-the-pakistan-emergency-march-2007-february-2008 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r693adEEGhQ As an increasing number of Pakistanis turned to YouTube, Flickr, Facebook, and SMS text messages as alternate media portals, the government clamped down on these sources. Between March 2007 and February 2008, cellphone networks were jammed, internet service providers were instructed to block the YouTube website, internet connectivity was limited or shut down, and blogging softwares were banned. Moreover, the authorities came to monitor the public&apos;s use of new media platforms: images of anti-government rallies posted to Flickr were used to identify and arrest protesters.... The only antidote to the government&apos;s control of digital and new media tools, this paper shows, was the widening of the networked public sphere to include Pakistanis in the diaspora and global media sources. For example, when the government blocked news channels and jammed cellular networks in November 2007, young Pakistanis across the globe continued to plan and organize protest rallies via the social networking site Facebook. Similarly, when university students demanding the restoration of an independent judiciary realized that security officials had prevented journalists from covering their protest, they submitted self-generated video clips and images to CNN&apos;s iReport, an online citizen journalism initiative. Indeed, as Pakistan&apos;s media landscape became a hybrid model in which professional and amateur journalists generated and disseminated news by whatever means possible, international mainstream media outfits such as CNN, the BBC, and the UK-based Channel 4 increasingly sought out hyperlocal reporting posted to local blogs, YouTube, and Facebook. Can tools of digital activism also be harnessed as tools of expression? Can young Pakistanis overcome the participation gap and use new media platforms to enact democratic and participatory practices on an everyday basis and not only as tools for community organizing during crises? More importantly, is it necessary for new media platforms to be used in a sustainable way, or is it adequate that developing nations muster ‘silent armies’ of networked citizen journalists and community organizers who can mobilize during crises?
  • core functions/societal roles of media: environmental surveillance escape/entertainment (transmission of culture including validation of civil society values) connectivity (achieving consensus among segments of society)
  • The Cellphone, Navigating Our Lives - NYTimes.com Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/17/science/17map.html Cellphones have changed how we communicate with others, and now they are changing how we think about information. wow... take a moment to read and consider the implications of the following profound snippet from this New York Times piece: &amp;quot;With the dominance of the cellphone, a new metaphor is emerging for how we organize, find and use information [...] That metaphor is the map [...] As this metaphor takes over, it will change the way we behave, the way we think and the way we find our way around [...].&amp;quot;
  • Everything is a copy of a copy. Everything is a code, or a model, or a representation. In today’s society, people even create model’s of themselves, using programs such as Second Life. Even with technology, such as Instant Messaging, people are modeling real conversation with people. In a sense, everything in the world is no longer real because everything has already happened. All things that happen, for example demonstrations are just simulations of ones that have happened before. At this point, there is just an indefinite number of simulations constantly occurring, even if people think they are “real.” This story emphasizes the idea of “no reality” in a chilling story of a world literally taken over by the model. source: http://english149-w2008.pbworks.com/Jayne+Goldsmith,+%22Borges%27+On+Exactitude+in+Science%22:+Modeling+the+Model
  • Media Access

    1. 1. <ul><li>recap media control </li></ul><ul><li>one of the key “qualities” of media (next to: recording, storage, and access) is: control </li></ul><ul><li>control over content and experiences in media gets established through the intellectual property (ip) rights </li></ul><ul><li>three traditions in ip: copyright, copyleft, and creative commons (cc) </li></ul><ul><li>the pirate’s dilemma </li></ul>
    2. 2. <ul><li>media access </li></ul><ul><li>general trends: </li></ul><ul><li>ongoing integration of computing, telecommunications and (broadcast) media </li></ul><ul><li>internet moves into all other media </li></ul><ul><li>key issues: </li></ul><ul><li>black box fallacy </li></ul><ul><li>digital divides and the participation gap </li></ul><ul><li>reconfiguring access: technologies, people, services, information </li></ul><ul><li>digital divides: motivational, material, usage, skills </li></ul><ul><li>key quote in Van Dijk: “ increasingly, all familiar social and cultural differences in society are reflected in computer and internet use ” </li></ul>
    3. 4. the black box fallacy
    4. 7. availability of technology
    5. 8. does not equal access
    6. 10. motivational access material access usage access skills access
    7. 11. the gendered nature of internet use
    8. 16. access and race
    9. 17. access and class
    10. 18. access and place
    11. 19. expectations of media versus media access and use
    12. 21. the participation gap
    13. 22. is pervasiveness the same as importance?
    14. 23. “ with the dominance of the cell phone, a new metaphor is emerging for how we organize, find and use information [...] that metaphor is the map [...] as this metaphor takes over, it will change the way we behave, the way we think and the way we find our way around [...].” from the New York Times February 17, 2009
    15. 24. Jorge Luis Borges (1946) “ in that empire, the art of cartography attained such perfection that the map of a single province occupied the entirety of a city, and the map of the empire, the entirety of a province. in time, those unconscionable maps no longer satisfied, and the cartographers guilds struck a map of the empire whose size was that of the empire, and which coincided point for point with it. the following generations, who were not so fond of the study of cartography as their forebears had been, saw that that vast map was useless, and not without some pitilessness was it, that they delivered it up to the inclemencies of sun and winters. in the deserts of the west, still today, there are tattered ruins of that map, inhabited by animals and beggars; in all the land there is no other relic of the disciplines of geography.”

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