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Making Media 2020 Course Slides 01

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Making Media 2020 Course Slides 01

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First of eight slideshows for the course Making Media (supported by the 2019 book of the same title) at the University of Amsterdam about what it is like to work in the media.

First of eight slideshows for the course Making Media (supported by the 2019 book of the same title) at the University of Amsterdam about what it is like to work in the media.

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Making Media 2020 Course Slides 01

  1. 1. Making Media: Production, Practices and Professions • critical analysis of media industries, management, and production • focus on: journalism, TV/film, games, music, advertising/marketing/public relations • exploration of what comes next… #makingmedia
  2. 2. Eline Huiberts E.Huiberts@uva.nl @emehuiberts Darren Carter D.M.Carter@uva.nl @Dmcarternl
  3. 3. 53 authors 35 chapters 29 women 24 men 14 countries 6 continents
  4. 4. Production
  5. 5. Practices
  6. 6. Professions
  7. 7. Good Work Bad Work good wages/working hours workplace/creative autonomy interest, involvement sociality self-esteem self-realization work-life balance security product excellence product contributing to the common good poor wages/working hours powerlessness boredom isolation shame frustrated development overwork risk low-quality products products do not contribute to well- being of others
  8. 8. • digitization of everything • hope/aspirational work • distribution
  9. 9. • media power: • commercial constraints • unequal labour markets • sources of exploitation
  10. 10. • production studies: • a direct conversation? • or bizarre forms of complicity?
  11. 11. collapse hybrid affordance technology data power flexibility precarity affect agency entrepreneurship
  12. 12. collapse
  13. 13. hybrid
  14. 14. affordance
  15. 15. technology
  16. 16. data
  17. 17. "We know what people watch on Netflix and we’re able with a high degree of confidence to understand how big a likely audience is for a given show based on people’s viewing habits."
  18. 18. "We know what people watch on Netflix and we’re able with a high degree of confidence to understand how big a likely audience is for a given show based on people’s viewing habits."
  19. 19. power
  20. 20. flexibility
  21. 21. precarity
  22. 22. Professional Identity Content Commerce Connectivity Creativity agency
  23. 23. affect
  24. 24. entrepreneurship
  25. 25. tips & tricks • take courses (on issues) you care about • get internships (and don’t work for free) • join professional communities • invest in your network • read/study media management and production scholarship • make media!

Editor's Notes

  • Making Media 01
    Introduction
    1 Introduction – Outline of the course, brief outline of the history, structure, and key insights of media industries and production studies as an academic discipline, including a review of the main theories that explain how and why the industry works the way it does. Readings: Chapters 1-4 from the Making Media textbook. Lecture date: February 3.
    Readings:
    Making Media: Production, Practices, and Professions 13
    Mark Deuze and Mirjam Prenger
    Media Industries: A Decade in Review 31
    Jennifer Holt and Alisa Perren
    Media Production Research and the Challenge of Normativity 45
    David Lee and Anna Zoellner
    Access and Mistrust in Media Industries Research 61
    Patrick Vonderau
  • what does it take to make it work?
  • what does it take to make it work?
  • some recent academic books on media production
    very few on what it is (really) like.
  • Media production considers issues at play within, across, and around the institutions and forces that create our media, our information, and our culture: management and economics, media policy, markets, consumers

    Media practices involve the various ways in which media professionals make media (and, importantly, how they ‘make it work’ in the media industries): innovation, working conditions, affective labour.

    Media professions are those more or less demarcated fields of work that make up professional life in the media industries, including (but not limited to): journalism, advertising, marketing communications, public relations, digital games, television, music and recording, and social media entertainment. Absent: FILM.
  • Eline Huiberts: Eline Huiberts graduated for her Bachelor of Science in 2012 at University of Utrecht in The Netherlands. She studied Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology and specialized in the subjects of conflict, identity and nation-building. Her final project there was doing fieldwork for three months in an organized informal settlement in Johannesburg, South Africa. There she focused on how white people who are economically deprived, coped in South Africa after apartheid. In 2013 she received her M.A. in Media and Journalism at Erasmus University in Rotterdam. For acquiring her degree she carried out focus-groups to gain more understanding of people’s reactions to images of distant suffering on the news. In 2018 Eline got her PhD at the University of Ghent. She worked on a project that further focuses on how audiences perceive images of distant suffering and how they process these images. She has worked as a researcher in the Netherlands at a commercial research and consultancy agency, and is now working at UvA and Erasmus University.

    Darren Carter: Vivid Image was set up by Darren Carter in 1992. The company has made animations, commercials, motion graphics for TV, video for events, documentaries, promo films for the Internet and commercial DVDs. With this background and experience, Vivid Image is effectively a one-stop address for a wide range of moving image projects. Here (www.vividimage.nl) is a small sample of the original work, highlighting different styles, concepts and solutions...all produced with a minimum amount of fuss, very sensible budgets and a lot of serious creative input. Freelancer for UNICEF, RTL4, Veronica, Frame Factory,
  • Media production considers issues at play within, across, and around the institutions and forces that create our media, our information, and our culture: management and economics, media policy, markets, consumers

    Media practices involve the various ways in which media professionals make media (and, importantly, how they ‘make it work’ in the media industries): innovation, working conditions, affective labour.

    Media professions are those more or less demarcated fields of work that make up professional life in the media industries, including (but not limited to): journalism, advertising, marketing communications, public relations, digital games, television, music and recording, and social media entertainment. Absent: FILM.
  • in recent decades there has been a marked shift from consumer electronics to information technology as the most powerful sectoral force shaping how media content gets produced, distributed, and experienced

    Automation, data, and algorithms play an increasing role in all forms of media work, acting as demand predictors as well as content creators
  • the digital realm introduces a new media logic, one that seems oblivious to industrial-age schedules or more or less predictable production cycles, forcing organizations to aggressively replace ‘analogue’ production practices with ‘digital’ ones.
  • what is good work in media work? table from: David Hesmondhalgh & Sarah Baker, “Creative Labour” (2011: 39)

    Bantz the news factory: dilemma of productivity over quality? bad work but productive, good work but low sales?
  • Media Industries: A Decade in Review 31
    Jennifer Holt and Alisa Perren

    Takeaways:
    Digitization has been among the most significant forces at work, shaping every- thing from industrial structures to business models, distribution strategies to marketing activities, and labour conditions to production practices.
    Work = affective, creative, hope, aspirational
    Digital distribution: distribution is responsible not only for intervening between but also for managing the relationships of consumers and producers
  • Media Production Research and the Challenge of Normativity 45
    David Lee and Anna Zoellner
  • Access and Mistrust in Media Industries Research 61
    Patrick Vonderau
  • collapsing units of analysis: system, social institutions, organizational, routines, individual, but not a flattening of hierarchies
    Overall, we see an ongoing convergence of different domains, sectors and disciplines within and across the creative industries, bringing new challenges for managing media firms, business models and production processes.
    convergence/blurring of boundaries: between roles, disciplines, genres
    Ik zou business models onder collapse schuiven: trad. modellen werken niet meer of nog maar deels, allerlei modellen lopen door elkaar heen, integratie van modellen etc; evt ook bij technology: the consumer as commodity/new commodity form.
    Business models (verschuivingen/disruptions in manieren om geld te verdienen door digitalisering, van leveren van content naar verdienen aan intermediair zijn, turning consumers into commodities)
    vgl Bilton’s disappearing product
  • Media products are becoming increasingly hybridized and are thus difficult to place into categories that can be isolated and therefore effectively managed.
    making/promoting/distributing
    4c model: content and connectivity, creativity and commerce
  • Greenlight Intel Lady Gaga 2017
    http://www.greenlightmm.com/intel
    hybrid advertising, tech, social, music
  • transmedia storytelling and all the other opportunities for digital innovation and creative potential, cheaper and easy to use technologies, access to a truly global market
  • shift over the last twenty years from consumer electronics (CE) to information technology (IT) as the most powerful sectoral force shaping how music and culture are mediated and experienced
    rise of new publishers: the frightful five: The business model of FAANG/frightful 5 or scary 6 incl Microsoft devalues media content and marginalises media producers.
    key: they figured out distribution as key to profitability: no responsibility for content nor for channels.
    challenge: how to get people to find and access your content…
  • more focus is placed on user-generated content and consumer engagement as well as digital (Big) data
    algorithms as demand predictor as well as content generator
  • House of Cards: When the program, a remake of a BBC miniseries, was up for purchase in 2011 with David Fincher and Kevin Spacey attached, the folks at Netflix simply looked at their massive stash of data. Subscribers who watched the original series, they found, were also likely to watch movies directed by David Fincher and enjoy ones that starred Kevin Spacey. Considering the material and the players involved, the company was sure that an audience was out there.
    As Jonathan Friedland, Netflix’s communications director, told Wired in November, "We know what people watch on Netflix and we’re able with a high degree of confidence to understand how big a likely audience is for a given show based on people’s viewing habits."
  • a general shift in power away from professional content creators to users and owners
  • a general shift in power away from professional content creators to users and owners
  • flexibility as key governing principle in media work:
    numerical: the creative use of workforce numbers to manage more effectively the organization
    functional: the division of the workforce in a multi-skilled core of employees and a periphery of freelance professionals
    temporal: the lack of dependable, well-organized (such as ‘9-to-5’ type) working schedules
    financial: individualized and performance-based systems of rewards and remunerations (instead of unform salaries).
  • Labor conditions (vesrchuivingen in work/life-balance, opkomst gig-economy, noodzaak voor permanente profilering op social media etc)
    also for those with steady jobs (see game industry)
    learning to live with uncertainty (vgl Bauman: ropewalking without a safety net)
  • 4C Model of Media Work
    see Lampel/Shamsie: artistic value vs mass entertainment; product differentiation vs innovation
  • freelancers have had to find creative and experimental ways to address work-related challenges outside official legal regimes, including visibility projects, organized campaigns, and collective organizations
  • #metoo #balancetonporc
  • research: we need to pay attention to how making it work is all about integrating the creative self with system-based creativity; that can be selling out, but is ALSO about finding a voice, a place of work-life balance, a way to be financially secure as well as pursuing creative/artistic expression.
    consider affective, emotional, immaterial and passionate labor
    Passion (als buffer/motor/zelfrechtvaardiging voor alles - inclusief uitbuiting cq laten uitbuiten)


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Fa0yZA0miQ
    Director Spike celebrates the Oscar nomination for his movie BlackKlansman as best picture. video from the official Spike Lee twitter page.
    January 2019


  • passionate work: extreme emotions as part of making the work meaningful (suffering from exploitation, glass ceiling etc but “cannt believe I’m getting paid to do this”)
  • rise of entrepreneurship framed as individual solutions to systemic problems
    alternative conceptualization of e.: not as business savior, but as social support system.

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