Harlem Renaissance Poetry

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Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Arna Bontempts - English 3

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  • Harlem Renaissance Poetry

    1. 1. THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE
    2. 2. THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE Langston Hughes
    3. 3. THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE•Aliterary, artistic, cultural, intellectualmovement that began in Harlem, NewYork after World War I and endedaround 1935 during the GreatDepression. Langston Hughes
    4. 4. THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE•A literary, artistic, cultural, intellectual movement that began in Harlem, New York after World War I and ended around 1935 during the Great Depression.• Blacks of that era made major contributions in all artistic areas: literature (fiction, poetry, drama), music, visual arts, and intellectual thought. Langston Hughes
    5. 5. THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE•A literary, artistic, cultural, intellectual movement that began in Harlem, New York after World War I and ended around 1935 during the Great Depression.• Blacks of that era made major contributions in all artistic areas: literature (fiction, poetry, drama), music, visual arts, and intellectual thought.• Influenced blacks around the world. Langston Hughes
    6. 6. BACKGROUND
    7. 7. BACKGROUND• Originally a middle class to upper-middle class white community, these wealthy beginnings led to the development of stately houses, grand avenues, and world class amenities such as the Polo Grounds and the Harlem Opera House
    8. 8. BACKGROUND• Originally a middle class to upper-middle class white community, these wealthy beginnings led to the development of stately houses, grand avenues, and world class amenities such as the Polo Grounds and the Harlem Opera House• In the late 19th century, whites began abandoning the neighborhood and, by the beginning of the 20th century, became a middle-class black neighborhood
    9. 9. BACKGROUND• Originally a middle class to upper-middle class white community, these wealthy beginnings led to the development of stately houses, grand avenues, and world class amenities such as the Polo Grounds and the Harlem Opera House• In the late 19th century, whites began abandoning the neighborhood and, by the beginning of the 20th century, became a middle-class black neighborhood• Many blacks from the South moved north and settled in Harlem
    10. 10. SOCIAL ELEMENTS
    11. 11. SOCIAL ELEMENTS• While blacks were being oppressed around the country, particularly in the South, Harlem became a haven to celebrate black culture
    12. 12. SOCIAL ELEMENTS• While blacks were being oppressed around the country, particularly in the South, Harlem became a haven to celebrate black culture• Many works are political in nature and discuss the plight of "the negro," but others celebrated their cultural heritage
    13. 13. SOCIAL ELEMENTS• While blacks were being oppressed around the country, particularly in the South, Harlem became a haven to celebrate black culture• Many works are political in nature and discuss the plight of "the negro," but others celebrated their cultural heritage• Artand literature served to uplift the race and challenge racial stereotypes, while promoting racial and social integration
    14. 14. SOCIAL ELEMENTS• While blacks were being oppressed around the country, particularly in the South, Harlem became a haven to celebrate black culture• Many works are political in nature and discuss the plight of "the negro," but others celebrated their cultural heritage• Artand literature served to uplift the race and challenge racial stereotypes, while promoting racial and social integration• Writers wanted to prove their literature was equal to white writers
    15. 15. COUNTEE CULLEN
    16. 16. COUNTEE CULLEN• 1903-1946
    17. 17. COUNTEE CULLEN• 1903-1946• Born in New York City
    18. 18. COUNTEE CULLEN• 1903-1946• Born in New York City• Graduated from New York University and earned a masters degree from Harvard University
    19. 19. COUNTEE CULLEN• 1903-1946• Born in New York City• Graduated from New York University and earned a masters degree from Harvard University• He claimed all of American and English literature as the literary heritage of blacks
    20. 20. COUNTEE CULLEN• 1903-1946• Born in New York City• Graduated from New York University and earned a masters degree from Harvard University• He claimed all of American and English literature as the literary heritage of blacks• Taught French at an all-black junior high
    21. 21. "ANY HUMAN TO ANOTHER"
    22. 22. "ANY HUMAN TO ANOTHER"• Representative of much of Cullens poetry
    23. 23. "ANY HUMAN TO ANOTHER"• Representative of much of Cullens poetry• Cullen believed that, through its expression, poetry could transform pain into a thing of beauty and consoloation
    24. 24. "ANY HUMAN TO ANOTHER"• Representative of much of Cullens poetry• Cullen believed that, through its expression, poetry could transform pain into a thing of beauty and consoloation• Consider:
    25. 25. "ANY HUMAN TO ANOTHER"• Representative of much of Cullens poetry• Cullen believed that, through its expression, poetry could transform pain into a thing of beauty and consoloation• Consider: • How is the poem representative of the Harlem Renaissance?
    26. 26. "ANY HUMAN TO ANOTHER"• Representative of much of Cullens poetry• Cullen believed that, through its expression, poetry could transform pain into a thing of beauty and consoloation• Consider: • How is the poem representative of the Harlem Renaissance? • What is the final image of the poem? What does this reflect?
    27. 27. "ANY HUMAN TO ANOTHER"• Representative of much of Cullens poetry• Cullen believed that, through its expression, poetry could transform pain into a thing of beauty and consoloation• Consider: • How is the poem representative of the Harlem Renaissance? • What is the final image of the poem? What does this reflect? • What is the theme of the poem?
    28. 28. "ANY HUMAN TO ANOTHER" SUMMARY
    29. 29. "ANY HUMAN TO ANOTHER" SUMMARY• The speaker calls urgently for the combining and sharing of individuals griefs--including his own
    30. 30. "ANY HUMAN TO ANOTHER" SUMMARY• The speaker calls urgently for the combining and sharing of individuals griefs--including his own• However, he cautions that sorrow indiscriminately visits all people
    31. 31. "ANY HUMAN TO ANOTHER" SUMMARY• The speaker calls urgently for the combining and sharing of individuals griefs--including his own• However, he cautions that sorrow indiscriminately visits all people• No one should believe himself exempt
    32. 32. LANGSTON HUGHES
    33. 33. LANGSTON HUGHES• 1902-1967
    34. 34. LANGSTON HUGHES• 1902-1967• Emerged from the Harlem Renaissance as the most prolific and successful black writer in America.
    35. 35. LANGSTON HUGHES• 1902-1967• Emerged from the Harlem Renaissance as the most prolific and successful black writer in America.• Born in Missouri, Hughes traveled around the United States as a child while his mother searched for jobs.
    36. 36. LANGSTON HUGHES• 1902-1967• Emerged from the Harlem Renaissance as the most prolific and successful black writer in America.• Born in Missouri, Hughes traveled around the United States as a child while his mother searched for jobs.• As an adult, Hughes traveled to Europe and Africa as a merchant seaman.
    37. 37. LANGSTON HUGHES• 1902-1967• Emerged from the Harlem Renaissance as the most prolific and successful black writer in America.• Born in Missouri, Hughes traveled around the United States as a child while his mother searched for jobs.• As an adult, Hughes traveled to Europe and Africa as a merchant seaman.• Asa writer, Hughes stressed the theme that “black is beautiful” and explored the black human condition in his works.
    38. 38. HUGHES (CONTINUED)
    39. 39. HUGHES (CONTINUED)• Langston Hughes was heavily influenced by poet Carl Sandberg (1878-1967).
    40. 40. HUGHES (CONTINUED)• Langston Hughes was heavily influenced by poet Carl Sandberg (1878-1967). • Poems by each dealt with populist (concern for the views of ordinary people) ideas.
    41. 41. HUGHES (CONTINUED)• Langston Hughes was heavily influenced by poet Carl Sandberg (1878-1967). • Poems by each dealt with populist (concern for the views of ordinary people) ideas. • Sandberg dealt with working men and women (P. 740); Hughes dealt with the entire community of American blacks (P. 793 - “Primary Source”).
    42. 42. “THE NEGRO SPEAKS OF RIVERS”
    43. 43. “THE NEGRO SPEAKS OF RIVERS”• The Speaker - The voice of the poem. While this is often the poet himself or herself, it can also be a fictional character, a group of people, or an inanimate object.
    44. 44. “THE NEGRO SPEAKS OF RIVERS”• The Speaker - The voice of the poem. While this is often the poet himself or herself, it can also be a fictional character, a group of people, or an inanimate object.• Free Verse - Verse that has irregular meter and line length. Style is structured according to what the speaker is saying. A poem written for the working class will be written in that language.
    45. 45. “THE NEGRO SPEAKS OF RIVERS”• The Speaker - The voice of the poem. While this is often the poet himself or herself, it can also be a fictional character, a group of people, or an inanimate object.• Free Verse - Verse that has irregular meter and line length. Style is structured according to what the speaker is saying. A poem written for the working class will be written in that language.• In “The Negro Speaks of Rivers,” the speaker is “the negro” and free verse is used to imply spirituals.
    46. 46. • Hughes wrote this poem on the back of an envelope when he was a teenager on his way to visit his estranged father in Mexico.
    47. 47. • Hughes wrote this poem on the back of an envelope when he was a teenager on his way to visit his estranged father in Mexico.• The poem was dedicated to W. E. B. Du Bois, a prominent African-American historian and social activist
    48. 48. • Hughes wrote this poem on the back of an envelope when he was a teenager on his way to visit his estranged father in Mexico.• The poem was dedicated to W. E. B. Du Bois, a prominent African-American historian and social activist• The poem traces the movement of black life from the Euphrates and Nile rivers in Africa to the Mississippi. It implicates all of African and American slavery without saying it directly.
    49. 49. Langston Hughes explains and reads “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V425SdNWIJU
    50. 50. QUESTIONS• Whydoes Hughes specifically refer to the Euphrates, the Congo, the Nile, and the Mississippi rivers?• What is the theme of the poem?• How does the use of "I" when referring to a race of people contribute to the effectiveness of the poem?
    51. 51. ARNA BONTEMPS
    52. 52. ARNA BONTEMPS• 1902-1973
    53. 53. ARNA BONTEMPS• 1902-1973• Born in Louisiana and educated at the University of Chicago
    54. 54. ARNA BONTEMPS• 1902-1973• Born in Louisiana and educated at the University of Chicago• Lived in Los Angeles before moving to New York after reading a work by Harlem Renaissance poet Claude McKay in 1924
    55. 55. ARNA BONTEMPS• 1902-1973• Born in Louisiana and educated at the University of Chicago• Lived in Los Angeles before moving to New York after reading a work by Harlem Renaissance poet Claude McKay in 1924• One of the most scholarly figures of the Harlem Renaissance
    56. 56. ARNA BONTEMPS• 1902-1973• Born in Louisiana and educated at the University of Chicago• Lived in Los Angeles before moving to New York after reading a work by Harlem Renaissance poet Claude McKay in 1924• One of the most scholarly figures of the Harlem Renaissance• Attempted to counter blacks antipathy, including his parents, toward their blackness by establishing an intellectual and cultural climate which would engender black culture, literature and pride.
    57. 57. "A BLACK MAN TALKS OF REAPING"
    58. 58. "A BLACK MAN TALKS OF REAPING"• Reaping means cutting or harvesting grain from a field
    59. 59. "A BLACK MAN TALKS OF REAPING"• Reaping means cutting or harvesting grain from a field• Sown (line 1) means "to plant"
    60. 60. "A BLACK MAN TALKS OF REAPING"• Reaping means cutting or harvesting grain from a field• Sown (line 1) means "to plant"• Glean (line 11) means "to collect the remaining grain after reaping"
    61. 61. "A BLACK MAN TALKS OF REAPING"• Reaping means cutting or harvesting grain from a field• Sown (line 1) means "to plant"• Glean (line 11) means "to collect the remaining grain after reaping"• Metaphor - A comparison between two seemingly dissimilar things. This is an implied comparison with no connecting word.
    62. 62. "A BLACK MAN TALKS OF REAPING"• Reaping means cutting or harvesting grain from a field• Sown (line 1) means "to plant"• Glean (line 11) means "to collect the remaining grain after reaping"• Metaphor - A comparison between two seemingly dissimilar things. This is an implied comparison with no connecting word. • While you might be used to brief metaphors, they may alo be long, elaborate comparisons.
    63. 63. "A BLACK MAN TALKS OF REAPING"• Reaping means cutting or harvesting grain from a field• Sown (line 1) means "to plant"• Glean (line 11) means "to collect the remaining grain after reaping"• Metaphor - A comparison between two seemingly dissimilar things. This is an implied comparison with no connecting word. • While you might be used to brief metaphors, they may alo be long, elaborate comparisons. • Langston Hughes used an extended metaphor in "The Negro Speaks of Rivers" as he develops the comparison between rivers and the black people.
    64. 64. LITERAL SUMMARY
    65. 65. LITERAL SUMMARY• Thespeaker describes his careful planting of a large crop in which he has reaped only a small harvest
    66. 66. LITERAL SUMMARY• Thespeaker describes his careful planting of a large crop in which he has reaped only a small harvest• His brothers sons gather the bounty from the field
    67. 67. LITERAL SUMMARY• Thespeaker describes his careful planting of a large crop in which he has reaped only a small harvest• His brothers sons gather the bounty from the field• His children gather bitter fruit from fields they have not sown
    68. 68. DISCUSSION• In "A Black Man Talks of Reaping," farming is a metaphor for something larger. What is it a metaphor for? • What does "sowing" represent? • What does "reaping" represent?• Who is the speaker in the poem?• What is a possible theme from the poem?

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