Emerson and thoreau

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  • Emerson and thoreau

    1. 1. Ralph Waldo Emerson andHenry David Thoreau Transcendentalists
    2. 2. Emerson
    3. 3. Emerson• Born in Boston, Massachusetts
    4. 4. Emerson• Born in Boston, Massachusetts• 1803-1882
    5. 5. Emerson• Born in Boston, Massachusetts• 1803-1882• Educated at Boston Latin School and then Harvard College
    6. 6. Emerson• Born in Boston, Massachusetts• 1803-1882• Educated at Boston Latin School and then Harvard College• Ordained as a Unitarian Church minister in 1829, but left the church after his wife died.
    7. 7. Emerson• Born in Boston, Massachusetts• 1803-1882• Educated at Boston Latin School and then Harvard College• Ordained as a Unitarian Church minister in 1829, but left the church after his wife died.• Traveled abroad and began to formulate his transcendental faith
    8. 8. Emerson• Born in Boston, Massachusetts• 1803-1882• Educated at Boston Latin School and then Harvard College• Ordained as a Unitarian Church minister in 1829, but left the church after his wife died.• Traveled abroad and began to formulate his transcendental faith• Wrote the essays “Nature” and “Self-Reliance”
    9. 9. Emerson andTranscendentalism
    10. 10. Emerson and Transcendentalism• After returning from a trip to Europe, Emerson began to gather with a circle of poets, reformers, artists, and thinkers, who helped define a new national identity for American art.
    11. 11. Emerson and Transcendentalism• After returning from a trip to Europe, Emerson began to gather with a circle of poets, reformers, artists, and thinkers, who helped define a new national identity for American art.• Emerson told the group about his views on the unity of the human spirit and the Over-Soul, and the values of non-conformity, intellectual and spiritual independence, self-reliance, and utopian friendship.
    12. 12. Emerson and Transcendentalism• After returning from a trip to Europe, Emerson began to gather with a circle of poets, reformers, artists, and thinkers, who helped define a new national identity for American art.• Emerson told the group about his views on the unity of the human spirit and the Over-Soul, and the values of non-conformity, intellectual and spiritual independence, self-reliance, and utopian friendship.• He championed the abolition of slavery, the protection of Native Americans, and the crusade for peace and social justice.
    13. 13. Henry David Thoreau
    14. 14. Henry David Thoreau• Born in Concord, Massachusetts
    15. 15. Henry David Thoreau• Born in Concord, Massachusetts• 1817-1862
    16. 16. Henry David Thoreau• Born in Concord, Massachusetts• 1817-1862• Graduated from Harvard College in 1837
    17. 17. Henry David Thoreau• Born in Concord, Massachusetts• 1817-1862• Graduated from Harvard College in 1837• Friend and Student of Ralph Waldo Emerson
    18. 18. Henry David Thoreau• Born in Concord, Massachusetts• 1817-1862• Graduated from Harvard College in 1837• Friend and Student of Ralph Waldo Emerson• Spent two years secluded from society at Walden Pond where he tested his belief in the ability of man to transcend his senses and attain a higher understanding of life
    19. 19. Thoreau and His Life Works
    20. 20. Thoreau and His Life Works• Thoreau revolutionized American education when he created his own academic academy emphasizing classical literature, languages, natural philosophy, math, physics, and natural science
    21. 21. Thoreau and His Life Works• Thoreau revolutionized American education when he created his own academic academy emphasizing classical literature, languages, natural philosophy, math, physics, and natural science• On July 4, 1845, Thoreau built a 10-foot-by-15-foot cabin at Walden Pond, property owned by Emerson.
    22. 22. Thoreau and His Life Works• Thoreau revolutionized American education when he created his own academic academy emphasizing classical literature, languages, natural philosophy, math, physics, and natural science• On July 4, 1845, Thoreau built a 10-foot-by-15-foot cabin at Walden Pond, property owned by Emerson.• Thoreau spent two years growing food, chopping wood, and receiving visitors.
    23. 23. Leaving Walden• In 1847, Thoreau left Walden Pond deeming his experiment an absolute success: • "I learned this, at least, by my experiment; that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with success in uncommon hours."
    24. 24. Civil Disobedience
    25. 25. Civil Disobedience• In 1849, Thoreau published his essay “Civil Disobedience”
    26. 26. Civil Disobedience• In 1849, Thoreau published his essay “Civil Disobedience”• In the essay, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to silence citizens’ consciences and make them agents of injustice.
    27. 27. Civil Disobedience• In 1849, Thoreau published his essay “Civil Disobedience”• In the essay, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to silence citizens’ consciences and make them agents of injustice.• As an abolitionist, Thoreau allowed his cabin at Walden to be used as a stop on the Underground Railroad
    28. 28. Civil Disobedience• In 1849, Thoreau published his essay “Civil Disobedience”• In the essay, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to silence citizens’ consciences and make them agents of injustice.• As an abolitionist, Thoreau allowed his cabin at Walden to be used as a stop on the Underground Railroad• In 1846, Thoreau was arrested for refusing to pay taxes that would support the Spanish-American War.
    29. 29. Civil Disobedience• In 1849, Thoreau published his essay “Civil Disobedience”• In the essay, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to silence citizens’ consciences and make them agents of injustice.• As an abolitionist, Thoreau allowed his cabin at Walden to be used as a stop on the Underground Railroad• In 1846, Thoreau was arrested for refusing to pay taxes that would support the Spanish-American War.• This philosophy influenced Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr.
    30. 30. Anti-Transcendentalists• Dark romantic writers Edgar Allen Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Herman Melville all rejected transcendentalism• These authors focused on the limitations and potential destructiveness of human nature rather than on its possibilities

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