Crowsnest Fires<br />August 2003<br />Figure 1:  Background image1<br />
Crowsnest Fires<br />The Origin of the Fire<br />When: Aug. 2l, 2003.<br />Random seasonal wildfire <br />Changed directio...
Crowsnest fires<br />Features of the Fire<br />6-km wall of flame<br />reached 50 m into the sky, <br />Equivalent energy ...
Crowsnest Firesan eye witness account<br />Home Alone: Elaine Hruby, <br />Husband up north in Fort McMurray. <br />At 10 ...
Crowsnest Firesan eye witness account<br />Hruby<br />Collected:<br />Cat, dog, mining lamp, her jewelry (but not his), an...
Crowsnest Firesan eye witness account<br />“I felt masochistic, sitting on the outcropping,” Hruby recalls, “But those fla...
Crowsnest Firesthe fallout<br />Crowsnest Fire blaze (2003)<br />burned over 20,000 hectares of forest<br />Affecting:<br ...
Crowsnest Firesthe fallout<br />Example: Spray Lake Sawmills <br />Benefits:<br />able to use a significant amount of the ...
Crowsnest Firesthe fallout: Ecological Pros and Cons<br />Positive<br /><ul><li>Certainly a burned area is black and looks...
A burned area creates ecological diversity and allows for the development of rich undergrowth that wasn’t there before.</l...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Crowsnest Fire final version

452 views

Published on

this one includes credits for graphics

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
452
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Crowsnest Fire final version

  1. 1. Crowsnest Fires<br />August 2003<br />Figure 1: Background image1<br />
  2. 2. Crowsnest Fires<br />The Origin of the Fire<br />When: Aug. 2l, 2003.<br />Random seasonal wildfire <br />Changed direction and transformed into a giant fire.<br />Figure 2: Firelight2<br />
  3. 3. Crowsnest fires<br />Features of the Fire<br />6-km wall of flame<br />reached 50 m into the sky, <br />Equivalent energy of an atomic explosion every 30 minutes.<br />Figure 3: Aerial image3<br />
  4. 4. Crowsnest Firesan eye witness account<br />Home Alone: Elaine Hruby, <br />Husband up north in Fort McMurray. <br />At 10 a.m. authorities told her to leave. Immediately. <br />“I didn’t know what to take,” says Hruby, recalling her anxious departure, “You start doing crazy things.”<br />
  5. 5. Crowsnest Firesan eye witness account<br />Hruby<br />Collected:<br />Cat, dog, mining lamp, her jewelry (but not his), and a little plastic Buddha.<br />Mezmerized:<br />drove to lookout to watch fire<br />From her vantage point could watch the fire descend on Hillcrest<br />Despite her horror, she couldn’t stop looking<br />
  6. 6. Crowsnest Firesan eye witness account<br />“I felt masochistic, sitting on the outcropping,” Hruby recalls, “But those flames were like a magnet.”<br />Figure 4 Forest fire4<br />
  7. 7. Crowsnest Firesthe fallout<br />Crowsnest Fire blaze (2003)<br />burned over 20,000 hectares of forest<br />Affecting:<br />Timber industry, local businesses, tourism (especially hard hit<br />But<br />local dry cleaners, gas stations, restaurants and office services maintained a steady business.<br />
  8. 8. Crowsnest Firesthe fallout<br />Example: Spray Lake Sawmills <br />Benefits:<br />able to use a significant amount of the burnt lumber.<br />With large salvage quota (28%) able to ensure burnt lumber not wasted<br />Difficulties:<br />Root scorch<br />cost of accessibility<br />Debarking dilemma<br />burnt bark is not useable but de-barking the trees will keep the chips clean and reduce the carbon content. <br />
  9. 9. Crowsnest Firesthe fallout: Ecological Pros and Cons<br />Positive<br /><ul><li>Certainly a burned area is black and looks devoid of life.
  10. 10. A burned area creates ecological diversity and allows for the development of rich undergrowth that wasn’t there before.</li></ul>Negative<br />Over time burned area creates diversity that wasn’t there before<br />Large stands of timber smother the light and inhibit undergrowth – even though large stands of trees are aesthetically pleasing and profitable for the lumber industry.<br />
  11. 11. Crowsnest firesGraphic sources<br />Figure #:<br />Image obtained from:Jason Knight. (2003). Lost Creek Fire, Looking South: July 2003, [Online Image]. Retrieved September 17, 2009, from: http://www.geog.ubc.ca/courses/geog376/students/class06/fire/lost_creek_fire_south.jpg/<br />Image obtained from: Jason Knight. (2003). Hillcrest Fire: August 2, 2003, [Online Image]. Retrieved September 17, 2009, from: http://www.geog.ubc.ca/courses/geog376/students/class06/fire/hillcrest.jpg<br />Image obtained from: Jason Knight. (2003). Ridge Forest Fire, [Online Image]. Retrieved September 17, 2009, from: http://www.geog.ubc.ca/courses/geog376/students/class06/fire/ridge_forest_fire.jpg<br />Image obtained from: Photographer unknown. (2007). Special 2 Me: Damage Control vs teaching, [Online Image]. Retrieved September 17, 2009, from: http://specialedandme.files.wordpress.com/2007/11/forest-fire.jpe?w=310&h=192<br />

×