Designing your Classroom Creativity is a stepping stone to functional, working art classrooms. Often our classrooms inhibi...
Designing your Classroom How to make your classroom  Organized, Calm and Creative. 2
Designing your Classroom http://classroom.4teachers.org http://teacher.scholastic.com/tools/class_setup/ http://www.commun...
Designing your Classroom Little bit about me:  I am a K-5 art teacher in Lincoln, NE Public Schools. I taught K-12 art for...
Designing your Classroom The  entry to the classroom should be unobstructed,  leaving a clear path for chi to flow.  Obstr...
Designing your Classroom Classroom Feng Shui Fundamentals Here are a few basic principles of feng shui as they apply to cl...
Designing your Classroom
Designing your Classroom
Designing your Classroom
Designing your Classroom Teacher Center
Designing your Classroom Bookshelves should be placed in the far left corner of the classroom, from the perspective of the...
Designing your Classroom Avoid sharp-cornered objects . Sharp-cornered objects are not only potentially harmful, they are ...
Designing your Classroom Clutter   brings down your personal energy and negatively affects the flow of chi in your home — ...
Designing your Classroom Make sure your furniture represents the elements.  You obviously won’t be able to have a desk mad...
Designing your Classroom Bright greens and blues encourage learning and development , particularly in younger students.  O...
Designing your Classroom Windowless classrooms lead to stagnant energy and stagnant minds. A painting or a scene of nature...
Designing your Classroom The bagua, a divided aerial drawing of a room, provides first-time Feng Shui decorators with a si...
Designing your Classroom •  Bring  nature  into your space. Live plants are a symbol of abundance, harmony and healing and...
Designing your Classroom <ul><li>Gather items for the walls and projects/themes.  </li></ul>If you are designing a classro...
Designing your Classroom <ul><li>Enter the room.  </li></ul><ul><li>If it is dark, bring a small indoor lamp with you for ...
Designing your Classroom 3. Decide what your needs will be.  Will you need a reading circle?  A demonstration table?  A te...
Designing your Classroom 4.  Place like items together.  If you have an art area or science area in need of water, place i...
Designing your Classroom <ul><li>Plan for a continuous flow through the room.  </li></ul><ul><li>Can you exit each seat an...
Designing your Classroom How does an art room become a quality vehicle for success? Does your space provide “thinking” spa...
Designing your Classroom Is there a space where a child could hide?  Eliminate it.  Block off areas behind coat racks, etc...
Designing your Classroom How inviting is your space for your assistants?  Can they present information for you in a calm, ...
Designing your Classroom How easily can your presenters meet with your small group? Michelle L HansenDaberkow mdaberk  @  ...
Designing your Classroom Adding research to your space.  Students could research the walls.  This makes the room feel like...
Designing your Classroom The presenters could meet on the pond center.
Designing your Classroom A pond center created with a large blue tarp, and crocodiles cut out of green carpet. Another cen...
Designing your Classroom A white board at the front of the room ready for notes. And, a frog stuffed animal area to go to ...
Designing your Classroom
Designing your Classroom Special presentation space blocking some windows to the hallway…to stop interruptions. And this s...
Designing your Classroom Another center could be a book center, An art small group area… Tubs of water for experiments, Tu...
Designing your Classroom
Designing your Classroom Enjoy!
Designing your Classroom Some items to bring :  a fan, a lamp, other fun lighting, Extension Cords for these, and perhaps ...
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Design your bright lightroom

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Presentation designed to improve art classroom design through use of feng shui and other ideas. Presented at the National Art Education Convention NAEA Seattle, WA March 2011. Voice over not included. Most information shared through voice. Most information on slides cited at end of ppt., mdaberk71@gmail.com, mdaberk@lps.org, Lincoln Public Schools K-5 Art Educator Michelle L HansenDaberkow mdaberk

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  • DESIGNING

    2-Feng shui map

    3- These are some points to research about classroom design.

    4- A little bit about me…

    5- The main idea of a classroom is to reduce stress. To reduce stress, you can provide clean access to chairs, tables, and classroom centers. This includes the sink.

    6-Along with this idea: keep all the children facing you and your desk as priority. Face the students towards any “big” screen you have or white wall that you use for projection screens. So your screen may be behind you or to the left or right your desk.

    In the BIG picture, you may have the opportunity to redesign your space.
    You also may be restricted in space. This year I happen to be working out of a portable at a large sports complex as our building is renovated, and I get to keep everything in boxes and repack and move again July 28th or so, to begin teaching in a new art room August 9th.
    I’ve got to Move it , Move it! The more “stuff” I have, the more I have to move.

    7- Here is a photo of the room I have right now without students…
    8- The same room with students…

    9- Without the students, looking at the teacher’s desk. If I am a student, and I sit in this chair, can I see everything?

    10- with students…

    11-AS you enter the room, books should be on the left side. Just this little change around in your classroom might help encourage students to “feel” like thinking and learning in your room.

    12-In my room there are many sharp corners. Even though the tables have rounded corners, they form hexagons, so I push them together into snake like arrangements to sit as many students “facing” the desk and big screen as possible on the longest sides of the tables.

    I do have lamps in the room to help students orientate the classroom with a calm, homelike environment. I also have fake plants in pots to help bring the outdoors inside, and to create this home like sensation.

    13-Clutter… How do you feel about clutter?
    I have a younger brother that has streamlined his entire house. I am not a streamlined type of a person. I think my clutter of stuff is interesting, and I live among and around interesting items and arrangements of these items. Needless to say, I do try to keep clutter to a small amount in my classroom. I feel more able to work in less clutter, and I think children need less to do more.

    14-In my classroom, I do not have much option of arranging furniture. I placed chairs in a color order, all the red chairs at one table, tan at two others, green somewhere else, and then I can rotate colors around the room. Mismatched chairs came in handy.

    15- These are some ideas about color. The color you have on your classroom walls can be managed.
    You might get to paint sections of your room or apply large paper sheets to get a feel for what a color change might do for you.
    16-This type of space is not available to me this year. I’m currently working out of a Sports Complex, in a portable outside of the giant metal building.
    An extraordinary thing happened: I have TWO windows this year! Windows for the first time in thirteen years has been a joy. I feel like I can relate better to the outdoor world, and of course, I hear and feel the rain and snow when going in and out of the portable with students to meet the teachers in the big building.

    17-You may find this online and use it creatively. Devise of vision of how your art room looks from the doorway. For some rooms a total change is just not possible, you might make a few changes and keep these locations in mind for your office or your classroom.

    18-25…If you could walk into a blank room today…like I do during the summer for summer school…this might be your plan of action.

    26- For summer school we “rent” a building. We bring 4 car loads of art supplies and research materials to run the class. (microscopes, art supplies, animal fur, fish scales, samples of plants, files of information on each animal and plant in the state…Peterson guides, books, etc.)
    27-
    28-
    30- In this course, experts are brought in each day for experiencing frogs… pond life…etc.
    An area for the expert was in use often. Coming into a circle shape helped all the kindergarteners share the space.

    35/36- You just might have to rethink your space.
    Change can be hard. Sometimes the things of our lives are just not in our brains…
    Try a tiny change, then see if that change could change your student creativity.

    Creative classrooms can help you “CHANGE the World.”

    End slide: Enjoy!
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  • Great presentation. Should be 'Designing your Classroom'
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  • Feng shui map
  • Along with this idea: keep all the children facing you and your desk as priority. Face the students towards any “big” screen you have or white wall that you use for projection screens. So your screen may be behind you or to the left or right your desk.
  • Along with this idea: keep all the children facing you and your desk as priority. Face the students towards any “big” screen you have or white wall that you use for projection screens. So your screen may be behind you or to the left or right your desk.
  • Without the students, looking at the teacher’s desk. If I am a student, and I sit in this chair, can I see everything?
  • AS you enter the room, books should be on the left side. Just this little change around in your classroom might help encourage students to “feel” like thinking and learning in your room.
  • In my room there are many sharp corners. Even though the tables have rounded corners, they form hexagons, so I push them together into snake like arrangements to sit as many students “facing” the desk and big screen as possible on the longest sides of the tables. I do have lamps in the room to help students orientate the classroom with a calm, homelike environment. I also have fake plants in pots to help bring the outdoors inside, and to create this home like sensation.
  • In my classroom, I do not have much option of arranging furniture. I placed chairs in a color order, all the red chairs at one table, tan at two others, green somewhere else, and then I can rotate colors around the room. Mismatched chairs came in handy.
  • This type of space is not available to me this year. I’m currently working out of a Sports Complex, in a portable outside of the giant metal building. An extraordinary thing happened: I have TWO windows this year! Windows for the first time in thirteen years has been a joy. I feel like I can relate better to the outdoor world, and of course, I hear and feel the rain and snow when going in and out of the portable with students to meet the teachers in the big building.
  • You may find this online and use it creatively. Devise of vision of how your art room looks from the doorway. For some rooms a total change is just not possible, you might make a few changes and keep these locations in mind for your office or your classroom.
  • Design your bright lightroom

    1. 1. Designing your Classroom Creativity is a stepping stone to functional, working art classrooms. Often our classrooms inhibit our creativity. How can we use placement of items in the room to instill creativity and to activate learners in the art room? Can our rooms without windows become mind expansion tools for young artists? What does clutter mean for you? How does an art room become a quality vehicle for success? Can feng shui play any role in this planning? Do you feel creative in your work space? Come discover some ways to inspire young artists to feel more creative in your classroom.   Is your art room a vehicle for student success? Come imagine how space and objects arranged with simple feng shui ideas and creative play could enhance your classroom.   Michelle L HansenDaberkow
    2. 2. Designing your Classroom How to make your classroom Organized, Calm and Creative. 2
    3. 3. Designing your Classroom http://classroom.4teachers.org http://teacher.scholastic.com/tools/class_setup/ http://www.communityplaythings.com/resources/articles/RoomPlanning/ActivityAreas/index.html http://www.thecrabbynookgarden.com/HOMEOFFICEFENGSHUI.html Some places to “google:” *classroom design *office design *art room design. 3
    4. 4. Designing your Classroom Little bit about me: I am a K-5 art teacher in Lincoln, NE Public Schools. I taught K-12 art for 6 years in two small towns in Northeast Nebraska. I am currently in my 13 th year of teaching K-5 art in Lincoln, NE. I like adventuring into new ideas to bring into the art room, and I was asked to present a half hour on “designing” a summer school art room. I presented a general classroom design(not art specific) session to Bright Lights teachers in Lincoln, NE.. Teachers have tested out some of these slight changes in their math and science rooms, in their home environments (play rooms). They love some of the outcomes.
    5. 5. Designing your Classroom The entry to the classroom should be unobstructed, leaving a clear path for chi to flow. Obstructions to the path, says feng shui consultant Deborah Gee, &quot;create tension and stress with the students and the teacher.” Don’t obstruct the doorway. Keep supplies, still life items, books, and other items out of walkways. Keeping the entrance way clear will allow positive energy, or chi, to flow freely in and out of the room, unconstrained. You will be able to improve your mood as soon as you enter the room since your eyes won’t immediately jump to the clutter and disorganization and you won’t be tripping over chairs and the art projects from last month. 5
    6. 6. Designing your Classroom Classroom Feng Shui Fundamentals Here are a few basic principles of feng shui as they apply to classrooms: Both teacher and student desks should be in what feng shui considers the &quot;command position,&quot; facing the entry of the classroom to absorb chi as it enters the room. What is CHI? &quot;chi&quot; or &quot;qi&quot; is the invisible life force or vital energy that flows through all living things. It is thought to be inherited and also derived from food and air. Don’t lose sight of the door. Make sure all of your chairs and benches are situated so that anyone sitting will always be able to see the door. Having a way out and keeping track of who or what comes in is a traditional measure of good Feng Shui.
    7. 7. Designing your Classroom
    8. 8. Designing your Classroom
    9. 9. Designing your Classroom
    10. 10. Designing your Classroom Teacher Center
    11. 11. Designing your Classroom Bookshelves should be placed in the far left corner of the classroom, from the perspective of the front door. According to feng shui principles, this area encourages learning and critical thinking. Sketchbook center, Two tables of a bench with four Spaces for students to research Red rectangle is the door, exit and entrance.
    12. 12. Designing your Classroom Avoid sharp-cornered objects . Sharp-cornered objects are not only potentially harmful, they are also believed to obstruct the pathway of chi. Your desk will most likely have sharp corners, but as long as you are not sitting where they point directly at you, the chi will still be able to flow around you easily. If it doesn’t have a function, you don’t need it. If your extra table doesn’t hold a lamp or represent any of the key elements, you probably don’t need it.
    13. 13. Designing your Classroom Clutter brings down your personal energy and negatively affects the flow of chi in your home — the chi stagnates around the clutter and cannot move freely or bring fortunate blessings into your space and life. Also, keeping things you don’t love or use brings down your energy and doesn’t allow room for new experiences, people, or situations to come into your life. What is clutter for you? Perhaps something that needs to be removed from the classroom. If it is a poster you feel you can’t live without, maybe taking it down and placing it up when you speak about it could give it more importance. If it is a box, you could cover it with a piece of fabric. http://www.organization-makes-sense.com/clearing_clutter.html
    14. 14. Designing your Classroom Make sure your furniture represents the elements. You obviously won’t be able to have a desk made of fire, but try to incorporate the wood and metal elements into your furniture constitutions as much as possible. Most of your furniture will undoubtedly be made of wood, but see if you can find an end table made of aluminum or one that features a metallic finish. Give yourself a choice of places to sit. If you limit yourself to the one desk chair you use while on the computer, you’ll end up feeling cramped and panicky. Rearrange furniture frequently. Shifting your furniture frequently will maintain a healthy level of energy. You will subconsciously notice the changes, keeping you alert. Try moving the desk a few inches closer to the window or switching the placement of two chairs. It may not seem like a big change aesthetically, but you’ll be able to feel the results instantly.
    15. 15. Designing your Classroom Bright greens and blues encourage learning and development , particularly in younger students. Older students will benefit from darker colors, such as brown and black, which encourage wisdom and deep thinking. Blue is a soothing color and is best used in the East and Southeast areas of the room. Green “is considered to be a color of freshness, growth, and peace,”
    16. 16. Designing your Classroom Windowless classrooms lead to stagnant energy and stagnant minds. A painting or a scene of nature creates a sense of bringing outdoors in and has a very strong life-energy force. Plants can have a similar effect. -- AS Leave at least 3 feet between furniture. A standard Feng Shui tip for arranging your furniture is to leave at least 3 feet between all the pieces in the room. For instance, leave 3 feet between your desk and the computer chair when unoccupied.
    17. 17. Designing your Classroom The bagua, a divided aerial drawing of a room, provides first-time Feng Shui decorators with a simple how-to guide, The bottom of the diagram represents the room’s entrance. (Source: fengshuiforus.com) Classroom assistant location Meet & Greet entrance Book Center, Research
    18. 18. Designing your Classroom • Bring nature into your space. Live plants are a symbol of abundance, harmony and healing and caring for them will represent how you treat yourself. • Add color . Influence your mood with reds and oranges to stimulate, blues and greens to calm and relax , or whites and grays to focus the mind. • Use art to uplift. Pleasing works of art or Posters of your Theme will bring positive energy. • Sounds right. Gentle background music, chimes or rippling water fountains can positively affect the space and attract good energy.
    19. 19. Designing your Classroom <ul><li>Gather items for the walls and projects/themes. </li></ul>If you are designing a classroom for a summer school or private lessons, and you want a plan of action… Let’s say your class is about frogs and art. Gather frog books, umbrellas, stuffed animals, plastic replicas, frog pencil sharpeners, frog pencils, shower curtains, and sheets, posters, etc.
    20. 20. Designing your Classroom <ul><li>Enter the room. </li></ul><ul><li>If it is dark, bring a small indoor lamp with you for the first day of class. </li></ul><ul><li>If it is too light for your computer or BIG SCREEN, lower the shades. </li></ul><ul><li>( You can also use safety pins and cover window blinds/shades with your laminated posters or some fun, inviting shower curtain to control the incoming light.) </li></ul>
    21. 21. Designing your Classroom 3. Decide what your needs will be. Will you need a reading circle? A demonstration table? A teacher space? A supply area? A study nook? A painting or drawing center? A student teacher area for checklists? A screen for a power point presentation? A white board for the agenda of the day?
    22. 22. Designing your Classroom 4. Place like items together. If you have an art area or science area in need of water, place it near the sink or paper towels.
    23. 23. Designing your Classroom <ul><li>Plan for a continuous flow through the room. </li></ul><ul><li>Can you exit each seat and maneuver through the space with ease? Is there a clear pathway to the exit? </li></ul>
    24. 24. Designing your Classroom How does an art room become a quality vehicle for success? Does your space provide “thinking” space for your students? Is there a way to “unclutter” their time in your room? Are the items you need to use and share with students easy to access, but not able to create a “bottle-neck” or crowd that would slow down work time? (If using yarn for a fiber project, have 5 centers of yarn instead of only one…have a clear path to each. I try to imagine 6 students coming to each center.)
    25. 25. Designing your Classroom Is there a space where a child could hide? Eliminate it. Block off areas behind coat racks, etc. by pulling a table across the entrance… or stack your storage boxes in the entry way so that no one can get through. Safety First…Is there a clear exit for a fire drill? Can you see every child’s face at one time? (not the back of a head)
    26. 26. Designing your Classroom How inviting is your space for your assistants? Can they present information for you in a calm, encouraging environment? Summer school situation… Bright Lights, a nonprofit school for three weeks using Lincoln public school settings across the city.
    27. 27. Designing your Classroom How easily can your presenters meet with your small group? Michelle L HansenDaberkow mdaberk @ lps.org Summer class: Bright Lights scientific illustration “Drawing Nebraska native plants and animals” 3-4 th graders 14-18 students.
    28. 28. Designing your Classroom Adding research to your space. Students could research the walls. This makes the room feel like an exploratory space. It feels fun, and inviting. Nature Illustration Class: Lana Johnson- Michelle Hansen Daberkow
    29. 29. Designing your Classroom The presenters could meet on the pond center.
    30. 30. Designing your Classroom A pond center created with a large blue tarp, and crocodiles cut out of green carpet. Another center for games was a table cloth with pieces of felt cut in the shapes of lily pads…as we read about frogs and Monet’s lily pond.
    31. 31. Designing your Classroom A white board at the front of the room ready for notes. And, a frog stuffed animal area to go to after snack time as a brain break. (Sensory Station K-1 st grade)
    32. 32. Designing your Classroom
    33. 33. Designing your Classroom Special presentation space blocking some windows to the hallway…to stop interruptions. And this space is great to show off our art on Friday. Parents could walk beside it and file through to view their work. A boring board quickly goes “under water” with a clear, blue shower curtain.
    34. 34. Designing your Classroom Another center could be a book center, An art small group area… Tubs of water for experiments, Tubs of bark, leaves, and other items to build garden homes for frogs…etc. We also had insect lights as FROGS eat insects… Frog games, frog CD’s created by frog experts… Etc. Go WILD with your theme. Have fun!
    35. 35. Designing your Classroom
    36. 36. Designing your Classroom Enjoy!
    37. 37.
    38. 38. Designing your Classroom Some items to bring : a fan, a lamp, other fun lighting, Extension Cords for these, and perhaps a fake plant. More items: about 6 shower curtains to cover non used bookshelf units and bulletin boards. (Or use plastic table covers) Table cloths work, carpet squares for meeting areas… More items: themed umbrellas to place between two book shelves…

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