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“The Waters” Retirement Living    Development Proposal                      Synergy Business Centre                      P...
ContentsLocation                                   4Access                                     5   • By Car               ...
Chamber Developments is proud to propose     “The Waters” Retirement Living Project for     your consideration. We believe...
Location                                           “The Waters” in relation to NSW                                        ...
AccessBy CarThe proposed project is 12 kilometres from Newcastle CBDand two hours from Sydney on the F3. The site is adjac...
Capacity“The Waters” Retirement Living Project is capable of providing the full range of accommodation options. Potentialr...
Chamber Development’s concept design is for:                Precinct B – Existing Club Site                (to be demolish...
View to ClubhouseCouncil SupportThe site currently has Development Approval for the construction of tourist and residentia...
Shopping Centres                                                                                                          ...
RecreationalActivitiesShortland Waters Golf ClubShortland Waters Golf Club is a privately owned club withan 18-hole, par 7...
VolunteeringChamber Developments recognises that giving somethingback to the community will be important to many of theres...
DemographicsCurrent demographicsThe total population of Newcastle and Hunter Region is,            years of 55–64, with 2....
Retirement Livingin NewcastleChamber Developments completed a survey of retirement               Greenleaf Ashton Gardens,...
Maroba, WaratahMaroba is operated by a not-for-profit organisation and isthe only retirement living development within a 2...
Real Estate Sale History –NewcastleMedian house and unit prices in Newcastle have enjoyed         to $410,000 in 2009. In ...
Median House and Unit Sales                 Median House          House Price %                         Unit Price %    Ye...
Construction                                               ResourcesSchedule                                              ...
Appendix A –Worley Parsons Report10 March 2010           CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS   18
                                                                                              ...
Incorporating           Planning Workshop Australia                    BB and KT advised that the development could be un...
Appendix B –“Newcastle and the Hunter Region 2008–2009”, Hunter ValleyResearch Foundation Report10 March 2010             ...
Population and demography  Age                               The growth of the regional population is considered according...
Age distribution and change, Lower Hunter, 1996 - 2006                                                    Average         ...
• Among the under 40s, the age group with the greatest rate of decline (or                                     slowest rat...
Average annual rate of population change, Upper Hunter, 1996 - 2006       1.5%                      1.1%       1.0%       ...
The age distribution shown in the table above illustrates the ageing of the                                    Upper Hunte...
• In Gloucester the population declined at an average annual rate of 0.2                                     per cent.    ...
The age distribution shown in the table above illustrates the ageing of the                                       Other Hu...
• Maitland is the only LGA in the Hunter in which the population aged                                        under 40 incr...
The following table presents population totals and annual average rates of                                      growth for...
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Shortland waters-proposal

  1. 1. “The Waters” Retirement Living Development Proposal Synergy Business Centre PO Box 5335, Wollongong NSW 2520 Level 1, 1 Burelli Street, Wollongong NSW 2500 P: 02 4254 1054 F: 02 4254 1001 W: www.chamberdevelopments.com.au
  2. 2. ContentsLocation 4Access 5 • By Car 5 • By Bus 5 • By Train 5 • By Plane 5Capacity 6Council Support 8Local Services and Activities 9 • Hospitals 9 • Shopping Centres 9 • The University of Newcastle 9 • Shortland Waters Golf Club 10 • The Forum Sport and Aquatic Centre 10 • Volunteering 11 • The Hunter Valley 11Demographics 12 • Current Demographics 12 • Projected Population Growth 12Retirement Living in Newcastle 13Real Estate Sales History – Newcastle 15 • Median House and Unit Sales 16 • Recent Sales in Newcastle 16Construction Schedule 17Resources 17Reports 17Qualifier 17Appendices 18 • Appendix A 18 • Appendix B 21 • Appendix C 49 • Appendix D 5910 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 2
  3. 3. Chamber Developments is proud to propose “The Waters” Retirement Living Project for your consideration. We believe this project has the opportunity to provide a financially viable, sustainable and, most importantly, engaging retirement community for the population of Newcastle and its surrounding suburbs. “The Waters” (our working title) will be the latest in resort-style retirement living for discerning retirees who wish to pursue their interests and hobbies in a modern, sophisticated environment. “The Waters” is perfectly positioned on the grounds of a popular golfing facility. As part of the development of the site, Chamber Developments will be constructing a new Golf Clubhouse which will feature a bistro, gaming rooms, bar and conference facilities as well as upgrading the golf course. In addition, a motel will be built, serving not only golfing tourists and visitors to the conference centre, but also the families and friends of the residents of “The Waters” who will be able to visit in ease and comfort.10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 3
  4. 4. Location “The Waters” in relation to NSW “The Waters” “The Waters” in relation to Newcastle “The Waters”The proposed “The Waters” Retirement Living Project is ensures residents will have access to a broad range ofsituated on approximately seven hectares of land which activities outside of the environs of the retirement precinctfronts the Shortland Waters Golf Club and adjoins the itself. Chamber Developments believe this unique locationUniversity of Newcastle and “The Forum” Health and will ensure the Village will garner much interest fromAquatic Centre. “The Waters”’ prominent location between potential residents interested in pursuing active and fulfillingthe University, Golf Club and Health and Aquatic Centre lives in retirement.10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 4
  5. 5. AccessBy CarThe proposed project is 12 kilometres from Newcastle CBDand two hours from Sydney on the F3. The site is adjacentto the F3 Sydney to Newcastle extension, ensuring easeof access for families located in either city. In addition, thethriving communities of Hunter Valley and Port Stephensare also within easy distance of the project.By BusResidents of “The Waters” Retirement Living Project willenjoy ease of travel thanks to the well-serviced Universityof Newcastle campus. The university is serviced byregular buses to Newcastle and the surrounding suburbs,including: • Newcastle City • Charlestown • Lake Macquarie • Glendale • Cessnock / Kurri Kurri • Raymond Terrace • Medowie / Stockton • Port Stephens • North Coast.By TrainThe site is easily accessible by public transport with theUniversity / Warabrook Station only 500 metres away. Thisstation is fully disabled accessible. Trains leave regularlyfrom this station for: • Newcastle City • Maitland • Lake Macquarie • Central Coast / Sydney • Taree / Dungog • Upper Hunter Valley • Brisbane.By PlaneFor inter-state and international families, NewcastleWilliamtown Airport is located approximately 25 kilometresfrom the proposed site. It is the fastest growing regionalairport in Australia with over one million people travellingvia the airport in 2009.10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 5
  6. 6. Capacity“The Waters” Retirement Living Project is capable of providing the full range of accommodation options. Potentialresidents will enjoy the flexibility of choice and can be assured there will be an accommodation type to suit their needs. New Site Plan10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 6
  7. 7. Chamber Development’s concept design is for: Precinct B – Existing Club Site (to be demolished) • Commercial 1500m² • Independent Living Units 90 units - 22% – 3 bed - 56% – 2 bed - 22% – 1 bed • Golf Course Villas 22 units - 10% – 3 bed - 90% – 2 bed Precinct C – Seniors Living • Low/Highcare 130 single room units (30m²/room) 3900m² • Community/Admin Facility 1500m² • Commercial/Lifestyle/Health 500m² • Independent Living Units 180 units - 22% – 3 bed - 56% – 2 bed - 22% – 1 bed • Golf Course Villas 54 units - 10% – 3 bed - 90% – 2 bed Precinct A – New Club Site • Golf club 1500m² • Proshop and Storage 500m² • Recreation and Lifestyle 800m² • Multipurpose Function Centre 1200m² • Motel 60 rooms 2000m² These plans are a Concept Design and have been developed by BHI Architects in response to Chamber Development’s studies of the site and market. However, should you wish to proceed with the project, we look forward to the opportunity to further develop these plans jointly with you in order to ensure final plans are suitable to your needs prior to submission of the Development Application.10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 7
  8. 8. View to ClubhouseCouncil SupportThe site currently has Development Approval for the construction of tourist and residential units. However, ChamberDevelopments believes that these plans are unsuitable and have therefore proposed layout which will require a newDevelopment Application.Consultation with town planners Worley Parsons indicate that the proposed plan is within the purpose of the NewcastleEnvironmental Plan 2003 (NLEP 2003) and the State Environmental Planning Policy Local Housing for Seniors or Peoplewith a Disability, 2004 (Housing for Seniors SEPP). In initial discussions with Newcastle City Council, their Town Plannersadvise that the proposed plan is much more sustainable than the previously approved plan (See Appendix A).10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 8
  9. 9. Shopping Centres Residents of “The Waters” will have excellent access to four local shopping precincts and centres within an eight- kilometre radius of the site. These centres are: • Shortland Shops – 400 metres away • Stockland Jesmond Shopping Centre – 2.1 kilometres away • Stockland Wallsend Shopping Centre – 4.4 kilometres away • Westfield Kotara Shopping Centre – 8 kilometres away. Local Services The University of Newcastle The location of “The Waters” adjacent to the University and Activities of Newcastle offers residents the opportunity for further learning and personal development on their doorstep. The university is recognised as the leading tertiary education provider in the Hunter Region. It prides itself on its diverse demographic, with over half the enrolled students being mature age. There is a thriving support Hospitals network for mature age students to ensure they get the most out of their studies and university life. The Hunter region is serviced by a robust Hunter New England Health Service which is currently investing $1.18 Liaison between the Shortland Waters Golf Club and the billion of State Government funds in the delivery of capital University in the preparation of the existing Development works projects across the region. The Calvary Mater Approval show that the university is extremely supportive Hospital is just 5.2 kilometres from “The Waters” and the of the development of the course precinct. The University John Hunter Hospital is just 6.4 kilometres, in addition to a foresees positive additional patronage of the University number of day and private hospitals within a five-kilometre facilities by residents as well as additional facilities for radius of the project. “The Waters”’ location near excellent, the University attendees to utilise. At the time of writing, recently upgraded local hospitals will be very desirable to Chamber Developments is awaiting a meeting with the potential residents. University to discuss the proposed plan.Google Maps Print Notes “The Waters” can enter notes here. You Location of Local Hospitals in relation to “The Waters” Retirement Living Project D Key B F A Newcastle Private Hospital A B William Lane Day Hospital C John Hunter Public Hospital D Calvary Mater Hospital C E Lindgard Private Hospital F Christo Road Private Hospital E 2 km 1 mi ©2010 Google - Map data ©2010 MapData Sciences Pty Ltd, PSMA - Terms of Use 10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 9
  10. 10. RecreationalActivitiesShortland Waters Golf ClubShortland Waters Golf Club is a privately owned club withan 18-hole, par 71, 5,931-metre golf course. Establishedin 1935, the course has a strong local history and was thesocial mecca for nearby steelworkers.In association with the development of the “The Waters”Retirement Living Project, the Golf Clubhouse will becompletely rebuilt. In addition, the course itself will beupgraded. The brand new facilities will draw golfingenthusiasts to the area, and golfing retirees to the “TheWaters”.The Clubhouse will provide residents of “The Waters”with excellent services, including a bistro, bar and gamingfacilities. In addition there will be conference rooms whichresidents can hire for events and functions. A motelwill be constructed with the new clubhouse, providingfamilies and friends and the residents with superb short-term accommodation close to the “The Waters”. The Forum Sport and Aquatic Centre “The Waters” is located just 200 metres from “The Forum” Sport and Aquatic Centre. The centre is on the grounds of the University of Newcastle and services the fitness needs of students and residents of surrounding suburbs. The Centre has: • An Olympic standard eight-lane, 50-metre swimming pool which is heated in the winter • Aerobics studios • 90 group fitness classes a week in the pool and studios • Regular health and wellness seminars • Private training studios • Tennis centre • Squash complex • Five sport ovals. Residents of “The Waters” will enjoy access to this facility, with improved health and wellbeing through fitness and physical activities.10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 10
  11. 11. VolunteeringChamber Developments recognises that giving somethingback to the community will be important to many of theresidents of “The Waters”. Located in the immediate areais the extremely popular Hunter Wetlands Centre, wheremany local residents volunteer.“The Hunter Wetlands Centre Australia is a vibrantwetland ecosystem bursting with life. The site is regardedas a wetland of national and international importanceand the centre enjoys a growing reputation for excellencein wetland conservation, education and ecotourism.”(Source: The Hunter Wetlands Centre website.) Thecentre actively encourages volunteering and has anextremely professional and robust volunteering networkfor people wishing to contribute both indoors andoutdoors. The Hunter Valley “The Waters” is located 45 kilometres from the famous Hunter Valley region – one of Australia’s oldest and one of its most well-known wine regions. The Hunter is a popular tourist and holiday location which features over 60 restaurants, 120 wineries, 160 accommodation venues and a vast range of activities, including visiting cellar doors, antique stores or visiting historic towns and indigenous sites. In addition to being famous for food and wine, the Hunter Valley has also made a name for producing some of the most spectacular events. There are festivals celebrating the local produce, such as Lovedale Long Lunch and Semillon and Seafood and concerts featuring the world’s top musicians, including Jazz in the Vines and Opera in the Vineyards.10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 11
  12. 12. DemographicsCurrent demographicsThe total population of Newcastle and Hunter Region is, years of 55–64, with 2.6%, as shown in the table below.according to figures released by Global PDC Demographics (These figures are current to the last census in 2006.)and the Australian Bureau of Statistics, growing These figures indicate there will be a strong on-goingsignificantly year on year, with an average growth rate of market for retirement living as the pre-retirement segment0.6%. The most significant increase is in the pre-retirement of the population moves into the retirement bracket. Average Annual Newcastle 1996 2001 2006 Change 1996-2006 0–14 years 23,684 24,336 24,320 0.3% 15–24 years 21,614 20,545 21,757 0.1% 25–39 years 30,435 29,960 29,725 -0.2% 40–54 years 24,059 27,083 28,922 1.9% 55–64 years 11,339 12,342 14,623 2.6% 65+ years 22,458 22,355 22,405 0.0% Total 133,589 136,621 141,752 0.6% Demographics in the Region of Newcastle. Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics 1996 and 2006The demographics of the Hunter region as a whole is can be seen in the table below, there are significantrecognised to be aging. The ratio of the number of people percentage differences between the Hunter Region andaged 65 years and over to the number of working age NSW, suggesting that there will be a greater demand forpeople aged 15–64 years is higher in the Hunter Region retirement living in the Hunter than elsewhere in the state.than anywhere else in NSW with 25 per cent compared with21 per cent respectively. It has been recognised that the It is also worth noting that, according to the Hunter“major challenges of the future … are the need to provide the Valley Research Foundation, there was an increase in theinfrastructure and services required for the aging population” male population in the older years over the last decade,(“Newcastle and the Hunter Region 2008–2009”, Hunter Valley suggesting a substantial improvement in men’s health andResearch Foundation, pg. 9, attached as Appendix B). there is the expectancy that men’s health in the region willThe Hunter Region has a higher percentage of over 55s continue to improve, placing an even higher demand oncompared with NSW as a whole – 27.4% to 24.4%. As retirement housing. Hunter NSW Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Proportion Total Proportion Total of Total Change of Total Change Population ‘96–‘06 Population ‘96—‘06 55—59 years 6.5% 6.4% 6.4% 51.9% 6.2% 6.1% 6.1% 45.8% 60–64 years 5.5% 5.4% 5.4% 38.0% 4.9% 4.8% 4.8% 32.7% 65–69 years 4.4% 4.4% 4.4% 5.3% 3.9% 3.9% 3.9% 6.8% 70–74 years 3.1% 3.7% 3.4% 31.0% 2.6% 3.1% 2.9% 26.3% 75–79 years 3.1% 3.7% 3.4% 31.0% 2.6% 3.1% 2.9% 26.3% 80–84 years 2.1% 2.9% 2.5% 52.5% 1.8% 2.5% 2.1% 43.5% 85+ years 1.2% 2.6% 1.9% 71.6% 1.1% 2.3% 1.7% 61.6% Total % of 22.8% 29.1% 27.4% 23.1% 25.8% 24.4% populationSource: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census for Population and Housing, 1996 and 2006Projected population growthThe population of the Hunter Region is predicted to grow by 2026. This will create a pressure on housing availabilityin the coming decades, with the older population (ages 60 in the retirement sector in particular and on organisationsyears and over) expected to increase from 21.4% of the providing aged care.total population in 2006 to 27.9% of the total population10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 12
  13. 13. Retirement Livingin NewcastleChamber Developments completed a survey of retirement Greenleaf Ashton Gardens,villages in Newcastle and to confirm it’s findingscommissioned Robden Property Services to conduct a survey East Maitlandand report on its findings (See Appendix C – Robden Property This village is approximately 20 kilometres from ShortlandServices and Capability Statement). The report indicates there and was opened in 2003. Ashton Gardens consists ofis currently a range of retirement villages within a 25-kilometre 57 two- and three-bedroom units. The prices of the unitsradius of the proposed “The Waters” Retirement Living Project. are comparable to Belmont North. The village is locatedThe vast majority are villages that are 10 to 15 years old. adjacent to the New England Highway and is close to a largeThere appears to be seven main retirement villages within shopping centre. The site does not have any advantageousthe specified radius of “The Waters”. These villages are outlooks but does have a private hospital nearby.both privately run and not-for-profits and offer varyingstandards of living for residents. Greenleaf Terrace Gardens,Greenleaf Belmont North Raymond TerraceThis village is within 10 kilometres of “The Waters” and Terrace Gardens is approximately 20 kilometres fromis currently selling units in Stage 2 of the project. There Shortland and was opened in 2005. It is smaller than theare currently 44 completed units in Stages 1 and 2 with other Greenleaf facilities with only 20 units on site and noa planned total of 97 units when all stages have been more construction is planned.completed. This village is approximately five years old andhas seen reasonably strong sales with two-bedroom unitsselling for an average of $415,000 and three-bedroom units Bayside, Bonnells Bayselling for an average of $435,000. Bayside opened in 1997 and is located approximatelyThe units are average 90–100 square metres for a two- 15 kilometres from “The Waters”. The village is operatedbedroom unit with a single lock-up garage. In addition, some by Lend Lease Prime Life, who have a large portfolio ofunits also have a parking bay or carport. villages scattered up the eastern sea board.The site could be considered to have distant ocean views It has 237 two- and three-bedroom units, with the two-from some spots, although the terrain is reasonably hilly and bedroom units currently selling for $300,000. Bayside iswhile construction is ongoing, the landscaping is minimal. It located close to Lake Macquarie with many onsite facilitiesis located close to a moderate sized shopping centre. including 24-hour call assistance, landscaped gardens and a village bus. It is located five kilometres from a major shopping area. B C “The Waters” Key A Greenleaf Belmont North B Greenleaf Ashton Gardens, E East Maitland C Greenleaf Terrace Gardens, Raymond Terrace F G D Bayside, Bonnells Bay E Maroba, Waratah A F Bolton Point RSL Care G C A Brown Booragul D10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 13
  14. 14. Maroba, WaratahMaroba is operated by a not-for-profit organisation and isthe only retirement living development within a 25-kilometreradius that has both low care and high care facilities co-existing with independent living units on the same site.Waratah is an inner suburb of Newcastle and the village hasviews across Newcastle to the coast.The independent living village first opened 10 years ago anda second stage was completed in the last five years. Marobaconsists mostly of two-bedroom units with a few one- andthree-bedroom units. There are a total of 40 units in thefacility with two-bedroom units selling for $325,000. Thereis a planned addition to the village of a five-storey servicedapartment block with extensive city and coastal views. Theseapartments will be two- and three-bedrooms and up to 110square metres. The operator is hoping to achieve a yield in thevicinity of another 40 units, subject to Council approvals.Bolton Point RSL CareAmong the other villages in the area, the largest is BoltonPoint RSL Care with around 60 units on site. Theseunits have extensive views of Lake Macquarie and areapproximately 15 kilometres from Shortland. The villageunderwent refurbishment approximately six years ago.Sales of two-bedroom units is believed to be in the mid-$300,000s, however the operator was not in a positionto reveal current prices due to the licence agreementarrangement which sees prices matched to clients’ wealth.C A Brown BooragulThis is also a not-for-profit complex run by the AnglicanChurch and has a high- and low-care facility attached.Many of the units are more than 20 years old, however anumber were refurbished approximately eight years ago.The village does not have any significant views and islocated close to the main northern rail line and is subjectto constant train noise. Prices in this village range from themid-$100,000s for an older one-bedroom unit to $300,000for newer two- and three-bedroom units.Market observations indicate that prospective buyersare requiring two-bedroom units as a minimum, withthree-bedroom units becoming increasingly popular asthis allows family and, more frequently, grandchildrento visit and stay with ease and comfort. The not-for-profit sector is struggling to find a ready market withageing units. Yet some prospective residents regard theChurch organisations as providing continuity of care fromindependent living units through to higher care as they age.The result is a split in the Newcastle market – Churchorganisations which are operating retirement living ascomplete campuses (including low and high care) andprivate organisations which supply the market as “Over55” villages. The majority of these “over 55s” villages offera lifestyle to retirees, rather than aged care. Prospectiveresidents can be enticed from their suburban homes tounits providing the complex offers an open and activelifestyle, with facilities that appeals to an active andinterested group of retirees.A sample of brochures for these villages can be found inAppendix D.10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 14
  15. 15. Real Estate Sale History –NewcastleMedian house and unit prices in Newcastle have enjoyed to $410,000 in 2009. In addition, as can be seen fromsteady gains in the last ten years, with the median house the graph below (with the exception of a traditional pre-price rising from $357,000 in 2001 to $600,000 in 2009. Christmas dip), demand for the property in Newcastle isUnits have also seen gains, rising from $309,000 in 2001 meeting or outstripping supply. Median sale prices in Newcastle Median House Price Median Unit Price $500K $400K $300K $0K 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2010 Supply and Demand for properties in Newcastle Advertised properties (Supply) People looking (Demand) 1,500 150 1,000 100 500 50 0 0 Sep 09 Oct 09 Nov 09 Dec 09 Jan 1010 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 15
  16. 16. Median House and Unit Sales Median House House Price % Unit Price % Year Median Unit Price Price Change (YoY) Change (YoY) 2001 $357,000 35.4% $309,000 -13.0% 2002 $370,000 3.6% $369,000 19.4% 2003 $365,900 -1.1% $449,000 21.7% 2004 $535,000 46.2% $510,000 13.6% 2005 $346,750 -35.2% $450,000 -11.8% 2006 $545,000 57.2% $552,521 22.8% 2007 $555,000 1.8% $445,000 19.5% 2008 $640,000 15.3% $416,000 -6.5% 2009 $600,000 -6.3% $410,000 -1.4%Source: MyRPData.comRecent Sales in Newcastle Address Type Price Sale Type Beds Sale Date 12 Perkins Street House $495,000 Normal Sale - 23/12/09 307/4 Honeysuckle Dr Unit $440,000 Normal Sale 2 09/12/09 38 Wolfe St House $650,000 Normal Sale - 15/12/09 307/4 Honeysuckle Dr Unit $440,000 Normal Sale 2 09/12/09 36 Wolfe St House $650,000 Normal Sale 3 30/11/09 38 Wolfe St House $650,000 Normal Sale - 15/12/09 37 Perkins St House $440,000 Normal Sale 2 29/10/09 35 Perkins St House $400,000 Normal Sale 2 07/10/09Source: MyRPData.com10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 16
  17. 17. Construction ResourcesSchedule In the preparation of its projects, Chamber Developments has an association with, and draws on the resources of: • BHI – ArchitectsIt is envisaged that “The Waters” project would be • Coffey Projects – Project Managersconstructed in stages. As Chamber Developments willbe required to rebuild the clubhouse and those golf • Dean Dransfield – Hotel and Resort Consultantsholes that will be consumed by the project, it will be • HWL Ebsworth – Solicitorsnecessary to integrate construction schedules to allow • JBA – Urban Planningthe uninterrupted operation of the golf club and course. • Miller & Miller Strategic Communications Consultants • Mitchell Brandtman – Quantity Surveyors • Richard Chamberlain – Golf Course Architect • Robden Property Services – Retirement Living Consultant • Whelans Insites – Surveyors and Development Consultants • Worley Parsons – Urban and Town Planning Reports The following reports were completed as part of two Development Applications which were approved for Tourism at Shortland Waters Golf Club. These reports are to be updated as a requirement for the new Development Applications for the redevelopment of the club house, golfing facilities and The Waters Retirement Village. These reports may be used to gain knowledge of the site and will be made available on request. • Bushfire Threat Assessment by Harper Sommer O’Sullivan, dated July 2005 • Contamination Testing Report by Douglas Partners, dated July 2005 • Drainage Plan & Report by Geoff Craig & Associates • Ecological Assessment by Warren Brown, dated 11 July 2005 • Geotechnical Investigation by Douglas Partners, dated July 2005 • Landscape Design Report by Verge Landscape Architects • Noise Impact Assessment by Hunter Land Holdings Pty Ltd, dated July 2005 • Traffic Assessment Report by LB Dowling & Associates Pty Ltd, dated 14 July 2005 Qualifier This Development Proposal has been prepared solely for information purposes and to assist the purchaser in evaluating the offer proposed recognising that it may not contain all the required information. Neither Chamber Developments or its advisers have independently verified all of the information or data contained in this Development Proposal. Certain information contained in this Development Proposal has been supplied by Shortland Waters Golf Club and consultants engaged by it. These consultants are not presently engaged by Chamber Developments. It is anticipated that the purchaser will make its own investigations and analysis of the offer and the contents of this Development Proposal.10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 17
  18. 18. Appendix A –Worley Parsons Report10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 18
  19. 19.      Incorporating  Planning Workshop Australia       Proposed Shortland Waters Development Meeting with Newcastle City Council Officers 2 March 2010 In attendance: [DJ]- Damian Jaegar, Senior Development Officer/ Town Planner, Newcastle City Council (NCC) [DR]- David Reiner, Senior Development Officer (Acting Development Building Coordinator), NCC [BB]- Brian Brown, Director, Chamber Developments [MS]- Mark Stone, Director, Chamber Developments [KT]- Kevin Taylor, Director, Chamber Developments [GF]- Garry Fielding, NSW Manager Planning & Approvals, WorleyParsons  GF provided an outline of the development proposal for the Shortland Waters site, referring to the Preliminary Masterplan prepared by bhi Architecture. He indicated the intention to develop a new clubhouse, function centre and restaurant in the portion of the site the subject of Council’s consent for tourist accommodation near the western boundary of the site, immediately to the south-west of the Chichester pipeline; the development of approximately 250 seniors’ housing Self-Contained Dwellings adjacent to the southern and south-western boundary of the site; a nursing home within the south-eastern corner of the site; and a medical centre and convenience shops, either adjacent to the proposed nursing home or in the south-western corner of the site. It was also indicated that the two fairways displaced by the proposed development adjacent to the south-eastern boundary of the site, would be relocated to the Council owned land (former garbage tip) immediately to the north-east of the site.  GF indicated that the proposed development was permissible under the Newcastle Local Environmental Plan 2003 (NLEP 2003) and the State Environmental Planning Policy (Housing for Seniors or People with a Disability) 2004 (Housing for Seniors SEPP), referring particularly to the provisions of the SEPP concerning seniors’ housing on land used for the purposes of an existing registered club.  GF outlined the locational advantages the site offered for seniors’ housing development, noting its close proximity to the facilities at the University of Newcastle, including the Forum indoor sports centre and pool and the University library. He also referred to the potential for the site to utilise the nearby Warabrook train station.  DJ responded by confirming the permissibility of the proposed development under NLEP 2003 and the SEPP. He indicated the need to address bushfire protection measures, noise impacts associated with the railway line and overall traffic management. He particularly noted the need to avoid road links to the University road system that would encourage ‘rat runs’ from the University to the bridge access across Jesmond Bypass Road.10 March 2010 Shortland Waters meeting notes 2 Mar 2010.doc CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 19
  20. 20. Incorporating Planning Workshop Australia  BB and KT advised that the development could be undertaken in stages, with the first stage comprising the new clubhouse/ function centre and the relocation of the two fairways onto the land currently owned by NCC. They also indicated they had received support for the proposal through discussions with University officials.  GF advised that the next step in the planning process was to lodge an application for a Site Compatibility Certificate with the Department of Planning (DoP). Assuming this would be granted by DoP, a further meeting with Council officers would then be arranged to discuss in detail the development proposed for the site. Notes prepared by GF. Shortland Waters meeting notes 2 Mar 2010.doc 2 4 March 201010 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 20
  21. 21. Appendix B –“Newcastle and the Hunter Region 2008–2009”, Hunter ValleyResearch Foundation Report10 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 21
  22. 22. Population and demography Age The growth of the regional population is considered according to major sub- regions in the Hunter (the Lower Hunter, Upper Hunter and Other Hunter), distribution followed by a summary for the Region as a whole. and growth The population of the Lower Hunter totalled 493,462 persons in 2006. The 1996 – 2006 most populous local government areas (LGAs) were Lake Macquarie (183,139) and Newcastle (141,752). Over the 10 years between 1996 and 2006: Lower Hunter • The population of the sub-Region grew at an average annual rate of 0.9 per cent, slightly higher than the rate for the whole of the Hunter Region (0.8 per cent) and equivalent to the average rate of growth for the State. • The fastest growing LGAs were Maitland and Port Stephens, increasing at an average annual rate of 2.1 per cent and 1.7 per cent respectively. • The slowest growing LGAs were Cessnock, where the population increased at an average rate of 0.3 per cent per annum, followed by Newcastle and Lake Macquarie, each with an average rate of growth of 0.6 per cent per annum. The chart below compares growth rates in each of the Lower Hunter LGAs, the sub-Region in total, the Hunter and State. Details of the age distribution in the Lower Hunter are provided in the table over. Average annual rate of population change, Lower Hunter, 1996 - 2006 2.5% 2.1% 2.0% 1.7% 1.5% 1.0% 0.9% 0.8% 0.9% 0.6% 0.6% 0.5% 0.3% 0.0% Maitland Port Newcastle Lake Cessnock Lower Hunter NSW Stephens Macquarie Hunter total Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing , 1996 and 2006, Cat. No. 2068.0 Newcastle and the Hunter Region 2008 – 2009 110 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 22
  23. 23. Age distribution and change, Lower Hunter, 1996 - 2006 Average Average annual annual change change 1996 2001 2006 96–06 1996 2001 2006 96–06 Cessnock Lake Macquarie 0-14 years 10,553 10,218 10,043 -0.5% 38,099 37,809 35,872 -0.6% 15-24 years 6,167 5,880 5,875 -0.5% 22,955 22,684 23,158 0.1% 25-39 years 9,744 8,999 8,707 -1.1% 35,613 34,004 31,326 -1.3% 40-54 years 8,951 9,820 9,725 0.8% 35,846 38,992 39,066 0.9% 55-64 years 3,557 4,354 5,575 4.6% 15,989 19,147 22,969 3.7% 65+ years 5,763 6,106 6,281 0.9% 24,223 27,679 30,748 2.4% Total 44,735 45,377 46,206 0.3% 172,725 180,315 183,139 0.6% Maitland Newcastle 0-14 years 12,520 12,983 14,208 1.3% 23,684 24,336 24,320 0.3% 15-24 years 7,362 7,626 8,430 1.4% 21,614 20,545 21,757 0.1% 25-39 years 11,351 11,290 12,553 1.0% 30,435 29,960 29,725 -0.2% 40-54 years 10,111 11,664 12,960 2.5% 24,059 27,083 28,922 1.9% 55-64 years 3,628 4,717 6,495 6.0% 11,339 12,342 14,623 2.6% 65+ years 5,352 6,110 7,235 3.1% 22,458 22,355 22,405 0.0% Total 50,324 54,390 61,881 2.1% 133,589 136,621 141,752 0.6% Port Stephens Lower Hunter total 0-14 years 12,258 12,791 12,585 0.3% 97,114 98,137 97,028 0.0% 15-24 years 6,220 6,501 7,101 1.3% 64,318 63,236 66,321 0.3% 25-39 years 11,157 11,026 10,056 -1.0% 98,300 95,279 92,367 -0.6% 40-54 years 9,679 11,654 12,577 2.7% 88,646 99,213 103,250 1.5% 55-64 years 4,868 6,361 7,933 5.0% 39,381 46,921 57,595 3.9% 65+ years 6,964 8,438 10,232 3.9% 64,760 70,688 76,901 1.7% Total 51,146 56,771 60,484 1.7% 452,519 473,474 493,462 0.9% Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing, 1996 and 2006, Cat. No. 2068.0 The age distribution shown in the table above illustrates the ageing of the Lower Hunter population. Between 1996 and 2006: • In the sub-Region overall, the population aged 40 and over increased (at an average rate of 2.1 per cent per annum), while the population aged below 40 declined (by 0.2 per cent per annum on average). • Maitland was the only LGA in which the population aged below 40 increased (at an average annual rate of 1.2 per cent). Despite this growth, the increase in the older population (3.4 per cent per annum on average) substantially out-stripped that of the younger cohort. • The size of the younger population (below 40) remained relatively stable in Port Stephens and Newcastle, while it declined in both Cessnock and Lake Macquarie at an average rate of 0.7 per cent per annum. 2 Newcastle and the Hunter Region 2008 – 200910 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 23
  24. 24. • Among the under 40s, the age group with the greatest rate of decline (or slowest rate of increase) was the 25 to 39 year olds, the age range in which most women have children. The chart below compares rates of growth of the under 40 and 40 and over age cohorts in each of the Lower Hunter LGAs. Average annual rate of change of the younger and older population cohorts, Lower Hunter, 1996 - 2006 4.0% 3.6% 3.4% Under 40 40+ 3.5% 3.0% 2.5% 2.0% 2.1% 2.0% 1.7% 1.5% 1.2% 1.3% 1.0% 0.5% 0.04% 0.01% 0.0% -0.5% -0.2% -1.0% -0.7% -0.7% Maitland Port Stephens Newcastle Lake Macquarie Cessnock Lower Hunter total Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing , 1996 and 2006, Cat. No. 2068.0 Upper Hunter The population of the Upper Hunter totalled 50,152 persons in 2006, with Singleton the most populous of the three LGA (21,940). Over the 10 years between 1996 and 2006: • The population of the sub-Region grew at an average annual rate of 0.2 per cent, substantially lower than the rate for the whole of the Hunter Region (0.8 per cent) and the State (0.9 per cent). • The fastest growing LGA was Singleton, the population of which increased at an average annual rate of 1.1 per cent. • The population declined in both Muswellbrook and the Upper Hunter Shire, at an average annual rate of 0.1 per cent and 0.8 per cent respectively. The chart over compares growth rates in each of the Upper Hunter LGAs, the sub-Region in total, the Hunter and State. Details of the age distribution in the Upper Hunter are provided in the table following. Newcastle and the Hunter Region 2008 – 2009 310 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 24
  25. 25. Average annual rate of population change, Upper Hunter, 1996 - 2006 1.5% 1.1% 1.0% 0.8% 0.9% 0.5% 0.2% 0.0% -0.1% -0.5% -0.8% -1.0% Singleton Muswellbrook Upper Hunter Upper Hunter Hunter NSW Shire total Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing , 1996 and 2006, Cat. No. 2068.0 Age distribution and change, Upper Hunter, 1996 - 2006 Average Average annual annual change change 1996 2001 2006 96–06 1996 2001 2006 96–06 Muswellbrook Singleton 0-14 years 4,038 3,664 3,695 -0.9% 5,311 5,119 5,366 0.1% 15-24 years 2,208 1,926 2,059 -0.7% 2,690 2,788 2,911 0.8% 25-39 years 3,716 3,339 3,171 -1.6% 4,793 4,504 4,575 -0.5% 40-54 years 3,030 3,105 3,209 0.6% 4,027 4,598 4,826 1.8% 55-64 years 1,108 1,273 1,560 3.5% 1,327 1,625 2,187 5.1% 65+ years 1,264 1,396 1,542 2.0% 1,609 1,875 2,075 2.6% Total 15,364 14,703 15,236 -0.1% 19,757 20,509 21,940 1.1% Upper Hunter Shire Upper Hunter total 0-14 years 3,339 2,625 2,635 -2.3% 12,688 11,408 11,696 -0.8% 15-24 years 1,658 1,468 1,639 -0.1% 6,556 6,182 6,609 0.1% 25-39 years 3,005 2,266 2,279 -2.7% 11,514 10,109 10,025 -1.4% 40-54 years 2,940 2,635 2,815 -0.4% 9,997 10,338 10,850 0.8% 55-64 years 1,312 1,261 1,598 2.0% 3,747 4,159 5,345 3.6% 65+ years 1,817 1,589 2,010 1.0% 4,690 4,860 5,627 1.8% Total 14,071 11,844 12,976 -0.8% 49,192 47,056 50,152 0.2% Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing, 1996 and 2006, Cat. No. 2068.0 4 Newcastle and the Hunter Region 2008 – 200910 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 25
  26. 26. The age distribution shown in the table above illustrates the ageing of the Upper Hunter population. Between 1996 and 2006: • In the sub-Region overall, the population aged 40 and over increased (at an average rate of 1.7 per cent per annum), while the population aged below 40 declined (by 0.8 per cent per annum on average). • The size of the younger population (below 40) remained relatively stable in Singleton, while it declined in both Muswellbrook and the Upper Hunter Shire at an average annual rate of 1.1 per cent and 2.0 per cent respectively. • Among the under 40s, the age group with the greatest rate of decline was the 25 to 39 year olds, the age range in which most women have children. The chart below compares rates of growth of the under 40 and 40 and over age cohorts in each of the Upper Hunter LGAs. Average annual rate of change of the younger and older population cohorts, Upper Hunter, 1996 - 2006 3.0% 2.7% Under 40 40+ 2.0% 1.7% 1.6% 1.0% 0.6% 0.05% 0.0% -1.0% -0.8% -1.1% -2.0% -2.0% -3.0% Singleton Muswellbrook Upper Hunter Shire Upper Hunter total Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing , 1996 and 2006, Cat. No. 2068.0 Other Hunter The population of the Other Hunter area totalled 45,626 persons in 2006, with Great Lakes the most populous LGA (32,764). Over the 10 years between 1996 and 2006: • The population of the sub-Region area grew at an average annual rate of 1.2 per cent, higher than the rate for the whole of the Hunter Region (0.8 per cent) and the State (0.9 per cent). • Great Lakes was the fastest growing LGA, increasing at an average annual rate of 1.6 per cent. The population in Dungog rose at a substantially lower rate of 0.4 per cent per annum on average. Newcastle and the Hunter Region 2008 – 2009 510 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 26
  27. 27. • In Gloucester the population declined at an average annual rate of 0.2 per cent. The chart below compares growth rates in each of the Other Hunter LGAs, the sub-Region in total, the Hunter and State. Details of the age distribution in the Other Hunter follow in the table. Average annual rate of population change, Other Hunter, 1996 - 2006 2.0% 1.6% 1.5% 1.2% 1.0% 0.8% 0.9% 0.4% 0.5% 0.0% -0.2% -0.5% Great Lakes Dungog Gloucester Other Hunter Hunter NSW total Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing , 1996 and 2006, Cat. No. 2068.0 Age distribution and change, Other Hunter, 1996 - 2006 Average Average annual annual change change 1996 2001 2006 96–06 1996 2001 2006 96–06 Dungog Gloucester 0-14 years 1,834 1,813 1,701 -0.8% 1,113 987 874 -2.4% 15-24 years 854 864 873 0.2% 508 438 422 -1.8% 25-39 years 1,643 1,455 1,266 -2.6% 901 753 625 -3.6% 40-54 years 1,554 1,843 1,884 1.9% 958 1,016 1,029 0.7% 55-64 years 803 952 1,081 3.0% 577 621 786 3.1% 65+ years 1,032 1,110 1,257 2.0% 829 936 1,064 2.5% Total 7,720 8,037 8,062 0.4% 4,886 4,751 4,800 -0.2% Great Lakes Other Hunter total 0-14 years 5,518 5,513 5,263 -0.5% 8,465 8,313 7,838 -0.8% 15-24 years 2,381 2,653 2,869 1.9% 3,743 3,955 4,164 1.1% 25-39 years 4,652 4,372 4,004 -1.5% 7,196 6,580 5,895 -2.0% 40-54 years 5,091 6,115 6,393 2.3% 7,603 8,974 9,306 2.0% 55-64 years 3,673 4,726 5,139 3.4% 5,053 6,299 7,006 3.3% 65+ years 6,771 7,822 9,096 3.0% 8,632 9,868 11,417 2.8% Total 28,086 31,201 32,764 1.6% 40,692 43,989 45,626 1.2% Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing, 1996 and 2006, Cat. No. 2068.0 6 Newcastle and the Hunter Region 2008 – 200910 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 27
  28. 28. The age distribution shown in the table above illustrates the ageing of the Other Hunter population. Between 1996 and 2006: • In the sub-Region overall, the population aged 40 and over increased (at an average rate of 2.7 per cent per annum), while the population aged below 40 declined (by 0.8 per cent per annum on average). • The size of the younger population (below 40) declined in all LGAs, with the rate of decline lowest in Great Lakes (0.3 per cent per annum on average) and highest in Gloucester (2.7 per cent). • Among the under 40s, the age group with the greatest rate of decline was the 25 to 39 year olds, the age range in which most women have children. The chart below compares the rates of growth of the under 40 and 40 and over age cohorts in each of the Other Hunter LGAs. Average annual rate of change of the younger and older population cohorts, Other Hunter, 1996 - 2006 2.9% 3.0% Under 40 40+ 2.7% 2.2% 2.0% 2.0% 1.0% 0.0% -0.3% -1.0% -0.8% -1.2% -2.0% -3.0% -2.7% Great Lakes Dungog Gloucester Other Hunter total Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing , 1996 and 2006, Cat. No. 2068.0 The Hunter In 2006 the population of the Hunter Region was 589,240 persons, approximately 9 per cent of the State total of 6.5 million. The charts over Region present population growth rates for all Hunter Region LGAs over the decade from 1996 to 2006: • The fastest growing, at rates above the regional and State averages, were: Maitland (at an average annual rate of 2.1 per cent), Port Stephens (1.7 per cent), Great Lakes (1.6 per cent) and Singleton (1.1 per cent). In all other LGAs the population increased at a relatively slow rate, or it declined. There were declines in Muswellbrook (at an average annual rate of 0.1 per cent), Gloucester (0.2 per cent) and the Upper Hunter Shire (0.8 per cent). Newcastle and the Hunter Region 2008 – 2009 710 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 28
  29. 29. • Maitland is the only LGA in the Hunter in which the population aged under 40 increased, though the rate of increase of this group was substantially lower than for the over 40s (1.2 per cent per annum on average compared with 3.4 per cent respectively). • The younger population was relatively stable in Singleton, Port Stephens and Newcastle, and it declined in all other Hunter LGAs. Rates of decline in the under 40 age cohort were greatest in Muswellbrook (1.1 per cent per annum on average), Dungog (1.2 per cent), Upper Hunter Shire (2.0 per cent) and Gloucester (2.7 per cent). Average annual rate of population change, Hunter Region, 1996 - 2006 2.5% 2.1% 2.0% 1.7% 1.6% 1.5% 1.1% 1.2% 1.0% 0.9% 0.8% 0.9% 0.6% 0.6% 0.4% 0.3% 0.5% 0.2% 0.0% -0.1% -0.2% -0.5% -1.0% -0.8% SW al r nd ns ie g le ok re n al al s r k te te ke go to oc ot ar st ot ot hi he t la un ro es le N rt La ca qu rt rt un sn rS llb ai ep H ng uc te te te ew D ac es M at te we un St Si lo un un C re un M N G us H rt H H G H ke Po er M er er er La th w pp pp Lo O U U Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing , 1996 and 2006, Cat. No. 2068.0 Average annual rate of change of the younger and older population cohorts, Hunter Region, 1996 - 2006 4.0% 3.4% 3.6% Under 40 40+ 2.7% 2.9% 3.0% 2.0% 2.2% 2.0% 2.0% 1.7% 1.6% 1.2% 1.3% 1.0% 0.6% 0.0% 0.05% 0.04% 0.01% -1.0% -0.3% -0.7% -0.7% -1.1% -1.2% -2.0% -2.0% -3.0% -2.7% nd s ie og tle k re on r es ck te en o ar i ak s t la g ro o et Sh es h ca qu un sn l lb ai ep tL ng uc r ew D es ac l M te we a St Si lo C re un M N G us rt G rH ke Po M La e pp U Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing , 1996 and 2006, Cat. No. 2068.0 8 Newcastle and the Hunter Region 2008 – 200910 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 29
  30. 30. The following table presents population totals and annual average rates of growth for specified age groups in the Region and the State between 1996 and 2006: • Rates of growth were similar in the Region and State although, on balance, there was a small decline in the regional population aged under 40 (by an average of 0.3 per cent per annum), while there was a very slight increase in this cohort in the State (by an average of 0.01 per cent per annum). • In the both the Region and the State there was a decline in the population of 25 to 39 year olds, the age range in which most women have children. The decline in the Hunter was greater than in the State. • The rate of increase in the older population (aged 40 and above) was slightly higher in the Hunter (2.1 per cent per annum on average) than in the State (2.0 per cent). The old-age dependency ratio is the ratio of the number of people aged 65 and over to the number of working age people between 15 and 64. This ratio has been increasing over the past decade in both the Region and the State, meaning that there are proportionally fewer working age people to support the older, generally retired population. Moreover, the ratio is higher in the Hunter than in the State: 25 per cent compared with 21 per cent respectively in 2006. Major challenges for the future, now well recognised, are the need to provide the infrastructure and services required for the ageing population, and incentives to keep young people in regional areas. See also the population projections at the end of this chapter. Population age distribution and change, Hunter and NSW, 1996 - 2006 Hunter NSW Average Average annual annual change change 1996 2001 2006 96–06 1996 2001 2006 96–06 0-14 years 118,267 117,858 116,560 -0.1% 1,286,689 1,314,456 1,298,916 0.1% 15-24 years 74,617 73,373 77,103 0.3% 849,575 845,964 871,716 0.3% 25-39 years 117,010 111,968 108,281 -0.8% 1,397,074 1,400,152 1,365,729 -0.2% 40-54 years 106,246 118,525 123,402 1.5% 1,193,472 1,336,523 1,387,494 1.5% 55-64 years 48,181 57,379 69,948 3.8% 515,152 597,588 719,547 3.4% 65+ years 78,082 85,416 93,946 1.9% 764,244 831,896 905,777 1.7% Total 542,403 564,519 589,240 0.8% 6,006,206 6,326,579 6,549,179 0.9% Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing, 1996 and 2006, Cat. No. 2068.0 Newcastle and the Hunter Region 2008 – 2009 910 March 2010 CHAMBER DEVELOPMENTS 30

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