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Guía comenius 2013 15 (1)

Seville Tourist guide

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Guía comenius 2013 15 (1)

  1. 1. 1
  2. 2. 2 COMENIUS TOURIST GUIDE  Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………… 4 SEVILLE'S HISTORY  1st Traces………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5  Roman Period….……………………………………………………………………………….. 5  Visigoth Period .…………………………………………………….……………..…………. 5  Muslim Period ..…………………………………………………….…………..……………. 6  Christian Period…………………………………………………….…………………………. 6  Seville During the Colonization of America ….………….…………………………. 6  18th Century…………………………….…………………………….…………………………. 7  19th Century…………………………….…………………………….…………………………. 8  20th Century…………………………….…………………………….………..………………. 8 ART AND ARCHITECTURE  The Giralda …………………………….…………………………….…………………………. 9  The Cathedral………………………….…………………………...…………………………. 9  Seville's “Alcázar” Palace and Gardens……………..…….………………………… 10  General Spanish-American Colonial Archives……………………………………. 11  Museum of Fine Arts…………………………………………………………………….…. 11  Other Museums……………………………………………………………………….….….. 12  Sevillian Churches……………………………………..………………………….……….. 12  Salvador Church………………………………………………………………….………….. 13  Convents…………………………………………………………………………….………….. 13  Islamic Walls…..………………………………………………………………….………….. 14  The Golden Tower……………………………………………………………….………….. 14  The Medinaceli Palace (House of Pilatos) ………………..………………….……. 14  Charity Hospital………………………………………………………………….………….. 15  Focus-Abengoa Foundation………………………………………………….………….. 15  Hispalense University Headquarters…………………………………….………….. 15  Bullring……………………………………………….……………………………….……….. 16  San Telmo Palace……………………………….………………………………….……….. 16  The Countess of Lebrija's Palace……………………….…………………….……….. 16  City Hall……………………….………………………………………………..…….……….. 17  San Francisco Square……………….……………………………………..…….……….. 17  Andalusian Parliament (former Five Wounds Hospital) …………...……….. 17  Hercules Boulevard…………...……………………………………..………………..….. 18  Metropol Parasol…………...……………………………………..…….……………..….. 18  Santa Cruz neighborhood………………………………..………….……………....….. 19  Triana neighborhood………………………………………………….……………....….. 19  María Luisa Park……………………………………………….……….……………....…. 20  Spanish Square (Plaza de España) ……………………….…..….……………....…. 20  American Square (Plaza de América) ……………...……….……………….....…. 20
  3. 3. 3  La Cartuja……………...……….…………………………………………………………..…. 21 SEVILLE OUTSKIRTS  Valencina dolmenes...……….…..……………………………………………………..…. 21  The Carambolo...……….…..…………………………..………………………………….. 22  The Roman city of Italica...……….…….…………..………………………………….. 22  The Monastery of San Isidoro del Campo ……..………………………………….. 22  Alcalá de Guadaira……..……………………………………….………………………….. 22  Carmona……..……………………………………………………….……………………….. 22
  4. 4. 4 Introduction Seville is located in south-western Spain. It is the capital of the region of Andalusia in the province of Seville. In addition to being the capital of Andalusia, Seville is the headquarters of the Andalusian parliament. In terms of population, it is the fourth largest city in Spain, with 700,000 inhabitants within the city limits, and 1,000,000 inhabitants in the metropolitan area. Seville's most significant period was during the Renaissance (16th and 17th centuries). During this time, it was one of the most populated cities in Europe. Currently, its historic center is one of the largest in Europe. The Guadalquivir river passes through the city. The river has been one of the most crucial factors throughout its history, allowing the city access to sea navigation. Interestingly, Seville stands out as having more than 100 operas which are based on the city's environment by diverse authors. Some well-known authors who have written about Seville include: “Le Nozze di Figaro” and “Don Giovanni” by Wolfgang, A. Mozart, “Fidelio” by Ludwig van Beethoven, “Il Barbiere di Siviglia” by Gioacchino Rossini, and “Carmen” by Georges Bizet.
  5. 5. 5 SEVILLE'S HISTORY 1st Traces The territorial space that occupies the city of Seville was almost totally submerged underwater until the 9th century B.C.E. It is believed that in this century, a commerce exhange was established, where ships coming from the sea arrived smoothly due to frequent tides. This region later on would be the origin of the city of Seville. The first archeological remains that correspond to a populated region were found in the oldest part of the city in the 8th century B.C.E. Roman Period During the 1st Century B.C.E., the city walls used to protect Seville from possible invasions and river floods were lifted twice. In Hispalis (the Roman name for Seville) during 49 B.C., accounts of civil wars between Julius Cesar and Pompeyo were cited for the first time. In 45 B.C. Hispalis inhabitants officially became Roman citizens under the control of Julius Cesar. From this period, many diverse remains have been preserved: The Encarnación Square, which showcases arquitectural Roman ruins, is located in an underground storage place and is open to the public. In this square, you can also see the original 5 Roman columns that once formed this building. Visigoth Period In this period, Saint Isidore of Seville was the first Christian writer and Archbishop to compile a sum of universal knowledge titled “The Etymologiae”. This encyclopedia, formed of 448 chapters in 20 volumes, was well-known and appreciated during various centuries.
  6. 6. 6 Muslim Period In 712 A.D., Hispalis (Seville's Roman name) was conquered by the Arabs, and thus the city's name was changed to Ishbiliya. In 844 A.D., the city suffered a Viking float attack that arrived by the river. Between the 11th and 12th century, the city became a great city within Al-Andalus (the territorial name of the Iberian Peninsula occupied by the Arabs). In 1091 A.D., the Almoravids (originating from northern Africa) conquered the city. Later in 1147, the Almohads, a new dynasty also originating from northern Africa, took control of the city. During the reign of the Almohads, Ishbiliya lived in splendour and wealth. They carried out many public works such as creating the first bridge to connect the Gualdalquivir river, building numerous palaces, enlarging the city walls and constructing a newer and bigger central mosque. Both the Almoravids and Almohads extended the city walls, which had significant physical aspects until the 20th century A.D. During this period, the city preserved a great historic and artistic heritage from this period. Aside for the city walls, the "Torre del Oro" (the Golden Tower) built in 1220 A.D, parts of the "Real Alcázar" (The Royal Palace), and the Giralda tower were built during this time. Christian Period In 1248 the king of Castille and Leon (two kingdoms in the Iberian Peninsula), Ferdinand III, conquered Ishbiliya, and took control of the city from the Almohads. After 500 years, Seville ended its Islamic reign. At this point, many churches and convents were built. The city became the home of various kings such as Alfonso X and Peter I. At the end of the 15th century, Seville was one of the most important cities in the Iberian Peninsula.
  7. 7. 7 Seville During the Colonization of America The Conquest of America had enormous repercussions in Seville. In 1503 the Catholic Monarchs (Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castille) founded the "Casa de la Contratación en Sevilla", which functioned as a traffic control for people, goods and vessels coming from America. As a result, the city experienced a tremendous boom. Seville's dynamism attracted people from all parts of Europe as well as artists. Diego Velazquez was born in Seville in 1599, as was Bartomé Esteban Murillo in 1617. Many other artists worked here such as Francisco de Zurbarán and Martínez Montañés. In 1502, the first university in Seville was founded. In 1519 the first sea expedition which accomplished the first complete sailing around the world left from Seville, and returned in 1522 (Magallanes-Elcano Expedition). In 1526, King Carlos the 5th and Isabel of Portugal were married in Seville's Alcazar. During the 16th and 17th centuries, Seville had well over 120,000 inhabitants, being one of the biggest and most populated cities in Europe. Unfortunately, in 1649 a deadly plague occurred, causing a big decline in the population. 18th Century In 1755, Seville suffered one the biggest earthquakes that the city had seen. Additionally the Royal Tobacco Factory was built and was considered one of the biggest buildings of the city. Currently the Royal Tobacco Factory is the central rector headquarters for the University of Seville. In 1785, King Carlos III created the General Archive of the Indies, with the goal of uniting all documents related to the Spanish American colonization.
  8. 8. 8 19th Century In 1810, Seville was invaded by French troops. Throughout this century, numerous public works were built. In addition, many convents were used for multiple functions such as hospitals, schools, or demolished to create public squares. In 1841, the old monastery headquarters of Cartuja was built, which also served as a ceramic factory for the English businessman, Charles Pickman. His products were nationally and internationally recognized. The first April Fair (Feria de April) was celebrated in 1847, and is considered one of the two most important Seville holidays followed by Holy Week processions. In 1852, the Triana bridge, which previously was built on top of rowboats, was finally built. In 1868 Seville regained its number of inhabitants that were lost in the 16th century. In the 19th century, there were many international tourists who were interested in the arquitectural wonders left by both Christians and Muslims from past centuries. Interestingly, a large number of medieval walls were tore down, and the city began to expand outside of its original city walls. 20th Century In 1929 the Iberian-American Exposition was inaugurated, which had a big impact for the city. The "Plaza de España" (Spain Plaza), found next to the "Parque de Maria Luisa" (Maria Luisa’s Park), was also built at this time. The Universal Exposition in Seville, whose theme was the Discovery of America, took place in 1992 and lasted for six months.112 countries and 23 international organizations participated in the Ibero-American Exposition. It had a big impact on the city's life and structure. An example of architectural structure built during that time is the "Puente del Alamillo" or Alamillo Bridge, built by Santiago Calatrava, a Spanish architect. That same year, the first high-speed train (AVE) inaugurated a route to Seville, which connected the city to Madrid. In addition, to the AVE train, a stadium built for 60,000 spectators was built. It was used for the UEFA Final Cup in 2003, Davis Cup in 2004 and the Athletism World Cup in 1999.
  9. 9. 9 ART AND ARCHITECTURE The Giralda The Giralda tower was built between 1184 and 1198 and previously functioned as the minaret for the city's most important mosque,. It was originally built by bricks on top of rocks. The top was surmounted by four metal spheres that fell off in 1356 as a result of an earthquake. In 1400, a bell was placed on top of the Giralda. The tower was Christianized between 1559 and 1568, when more bells were added to the uppermost part of the Giralda. The Giralda's external decorations were created as a way to Christianize the tower. The figure of a woman, designed in the Classic style, can be found at the top of the tower measuring 7 meters tall. It weighs 1000 kilograms, and functions as a weathervane. The tower is approximately 95 metres tall. The Giralda tower was declared an UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. One can climb the tower through the use of ramps and enjoy a magnificent view of the city. The Cathedral The Cathedral was built where the city's most important mosque once was. Its construction in gothic style began in 1434 and ended in 1506. Nevertheless, other parts were built later on in different styles. It was constructed by Flemish, French, German and Castillian people. The Cathedral has 5 naves along with various chapels. It is the biggest gothic church in the world, and the third-largest Christian temple after the Vatican's Saint Peter and London's Saint Paul. Like the Giralda tower, it was named an UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. Its interior includes an extensive and valuable artistic heritage, all from different historic periods, and composed of: paintings, alterpieces, 80 stained glass pieces, sculptures, gold and silver work, tapestries and other decorative art. Among the many artists whose work is featured here, Murillo, Zurbarán and Martínez Montañés stand out. The most eye-catching feature is the main altar that is 20 meters wide and 28 meters high, and is considered one of the biggest in the Christian world. Inside the Cathedral, you can find the tomb of Christopher Columbus. Based on DNA test results, researchers at the University of Granada proved the remains of Columbus were true.
  10. 10. 10 Seville's "Alcázar" Palace and Gardens The palace is composed of various buildings and gardens, and was built by monarchs from different periods, and in different artistic styles. The grounds have been commonly used to host members of the Spanish Royal Family and the President during official visits. This site was also declared an UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. Construction began in the 10th century and continued through the 14th century. Between 1364 and 1366 Peter I of Castille built the Mudéjar Palace. This is the most magnificent building in the Real Alcázar. The Palace's interior showcases two nuclei, one dedicated to the official life that sits around the ¨Patio of the Maidens¨ and the other intended for private life whose center was the ¨Patio of the Dolls¨. Other outstanding structures are the "Yeso" Patio (12th century), the Gothic Palace (13th century), the Justice Room (14th century) and remains of what once was the "Casa de la Contratación", or the port control center. The gardens occupy most of the palace grounds. Its origins can be traced to Arab vegetable gardens which existed previously in the palace.
  11. 11. 11 General Spanish-American Colonial Archives The General Spanish-American Colonial Archives was created in 1785 upon King Charles III's request to house documents, which referred to Spanish America, all in one location. The building that houses these documents had been built between 1583 and 1646 as a central venue for Seville's merchants. The building primarily housed documents regarding the governance and administration of Spain's colonies in Spanish America. The goal of the Archives was to conserve these documents and make them accessible to all citizens. It holds 7,000 maps, 43,000 files with more than 80 million original documents which contain three centuries of Spanish-American history, from Tierra del Fuego to the southern United States and other places like the Philippines. Along with the Giralda tower, Cathedral and Royal Palace, the Archives were declared an UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. Museum of Fine Arts This museum was established in 1839, and had previously been an old convent. It is considered one of Spain's most important fine arts museums. The museum's most important pieces are from the Baroque period, which contain works by many painters such as Murillo and Zurbarán, among others.
  12. 12. 12 Other Museums In Seville, there are various museums with different themes. Included are the Archaeological Museum, the Art and Popular Traditions Museum, the Naval Museum, the Flamenco Museum, the Carriage Museum, the Macarena Museum, the Bullfighting Museum, the Andalusian Contemporary Art Center and the Cathedral Museum. Sevillian Churches Many churches in Seville not only have a great exterior historical and artististic importance, but also a wide vary of interior artwork (paintings and sculptures). There is a great number of churches in Seville, most of them having a great historical-artistic significance including the artwork (paintings and sculptures) found inside of them. Among these churches, the ones that stand out the most are the El Salvador, Magdalena, San Luis and Santa Ana. The Santa Ana church was constructed in the 13th century and is located on the other side of the Guadalquivir river located in Triana neighbood. Religious image-making is a task of great importance in regard to Seville's artistic history. These images, created by sculptors, consisted of figures such as Jesus Christ, the Virgin Mary, and saints. These images were made in order to portray a religious culture in churches and convents. Images such as those that illustrate scenes from the passion of Jesus Christ were also created and then utilized during Holy Week processions. Some of the most important image makers are Juan de Mesa, Martínez Montañés, and Francisco Antonio Gijón, all of whom lived during the 16th and 17th centuries. Many baroque artistic works can be found throughout Seville. We can find art of this caliber in places like the Macarena church, el Cristo del Gran Poder, Cristo de la Expiración, and Triana. This type of art could even be found in Spanish America. From October 2009 to January 2010, London's National Gallery showcased many Sevillian pieces in its exhibition titled ¨The Sacred Made Real: Spanish paintings and sculptures from 1600 to 1700¨.
  13. 13. 13 Salvador Church The current Salvador Church was first built in the ninth century as the first main mosque of the city. From that time, many Roman, Visigoth and Arab remains have been perserved in this place such as columns, capitals, and a minaret. The present Salvador church was built in the late seventeenth century, and was the second most important church of its time. Inside you can find majestic eighteenth century altarpieces or images of the Passion of Jesus by sculptor Juan Martinez Montanes and the Christ of Love by Juan de Mesa 1620. The church is part of one of the most 16 important squares of the city, Salvador square. Convents There are a large number of convents in Seville. Some of them carry a great and valuable artistic heritage. These convents are famous for their grandiose cloisters and churches.
  14. 14. 14 Islamic Walls Seville's city walls, built during the 11th and 12th century, aproximately 7.300 metres in length, protected an area of some 300 hectares. The walls included 166 towers and more than a dozen entrances and gates. The walls were surrounded by a prewall and a moat, currently, various parts of the wall are conserved. The Golden Tower The Golden tower was built in the 13th century. It is located alongside the Guadalquivir river and at one point was attached to the Islamic wall. The Naval museum is found inside the tower. The Medinaceli Palace (House of Pilatos) This palace, built in the 16th century, is one of the most valuable existing palaces in Seville. On the ground floor, you can find a combination of architectural styles (mudéjar, gothic, and renaissance). At the end of the grand staircase that leads to the top floor, there is a collection of paintings. This palace contains a valuable group of squares covered in tiles, columns, frescos, coffered ceilings and classical and renaissance statues. Many of these pieces came from Italy.
  15. 15. 15 The Charity Hospital This old hospital was founded in the 17th century by Miguel de Mañara, a Sevillian noble. The hospital's mission was to emphasize the importance of charity and communicate the fragility of human life. This mission was also expressed through the paintings of Murillo, Valdés Leal and the main altarpiece representing Christ's burial. Among the paintings, four by Murillo were stolen during the French occupation of Spain. They can now be found in different museums around the world. Focus-Abengoa Foundation "Hospital de los Venerables" (Hospital of the Honored) was built in the 17th century as an asylum for priests. Later around 1990, The Focus-Abengoa Foundation was founded and serves as an important cultural institution. In 2007 the Diego Velázquez Research Center was established, which was created to study and spread his works. Hispalense University Headquarters The building is a valuable example of industrial architecture from the 18th century. It was built to house Seville's Tobacco Factory. Its main facade and patios are of special importance. Juan de Mesa's masterpiece "Cristo de la Buena Muerte", a sculpture depicting Christ on the cross made in 1620, can be seen in the building's chapel. De Mesa is one of the most important Spanish baroque artists.
  16. 16. 16 The Bullring The Plaza de Toros is one of the most important bullrings in the bullfighting world, and was built in the 18th century. Later in the 19th century, a museum was created inside the bullring. San Telmo Palace This building was constructed in the 17th and 18th centuries as a nautical school. It currently houses the President of Andalusia's offices. The Countess of Lebrija's Palace Pieces from the Roman city Itálica can be seen here, including a famous mosaic found in the main patio.
  17. 17. 17 City Hall The City Hall construction began in the 16th century under a Renaissance style. The majority of the hall was made in the 19th century. San Francisco Square Many events have taken place throughout Seville's history in the San Francisco Square. It is well known for being one of the oldest and most aesthetically-pleasing plazas in Seville. Andalusian Parliament (former Five Wounds Hospital) This Renaissance style building was built in the 16th century, and functioned as a hospital until 1970. It is one of the biggest buildings in the city, and currently is the Headquarters for the Andalusian Parlament.
  18. 18. 18 Hercules Boulevard In the Middle Ages, part of the Guadalquivir River passed through the Hercules Boulevard. In the sixteenth century, the Hercules boulevard was urbanized and converted into a landscaped public space for the majority of the old town . Two Roman columns from a building in Seville marked the beginning of this public space. This boulevard was taken as a model for designing other public spaces such as the Boulevard of the Shoeless in Lima ( Peru ) . Metropol Parasol What is currently now Metropol Parasol, was once a convent which later had been transformed into a market. Around the year 1990 the city hall began to build a public parking, and discovered many important Roman and Tartesos archaeological remains. The council in 2004 organized an international competition to rehabilitate the area, which was won by the Berlin architect Jürgen Mayer. The building was opened in 2011. At the top of the building there is a small square gazebo. Additionally, you can tour the decks above which give a good overview of the city. Below, there is a large public square and market. In the underground portion called Antiquarium archaeological museum, we can admire the archaeological remains, which occupy an area of about 4,900 square meters.
  19. 19. 19 Santa Cruz neighborhood This neighborhood along with San Bartolomé neighborhood is made up Seville's Jewish district. Although it was reformed at the beginning of the 20th century, it is considered to be one of the most representative neighborhoods of Seville. It consists of narrow roads, predominant white houses, and a good number of squares. Its most signficant is the Santa Cruz plaza. Its most popular streets are: Mateos Gago and "El Callejón del Agua." Diverse buildings can also be found in this neighborhood. This area is quite frequented due to its bars, bodegas, restaurants etc... Triana neighborhood Triana is another one of Seville's historic neighborhoods. Since its beginnings, it has been known for its popular, artisan, and naval culture. One outstanding image of the neighborhood is its manufactured ceramic pieces. Triana is considered to be one of the most important neighborhoods in Spain with regards to its ceramic manufacturing. It is considered to be one of the neighborhoods where flamenco music was born. In Triana you will also find bars, taverns, and other entertaining venues.
  20. 20. 20 María Luisa Park María Luisa is the city's historical park. Its renovation culminated during the 1929 Ibero-American exhibition, showcases the work of French landscape artist, Claude Nicolás Forestier. A great number of preserved pavillions from this exhibition can be found within the surrounding park. Its outstanding monuments are the Spain and American monuments and the monument of romantic writer, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer. Spanish Square (Plaza de España) This square was the emblem of the Ibero-American exhibition of 1929 and the main venue of the Spanish pavilion. Its semi-circle form has dimensions of 170x100 metres. It consists of a series of ceramic altarpieces dedicated to all the Spanish provinces. American Square (Plaza de América) This square was also part of the 1929 exhibition. In it, there are 3 pavillions that also took part in the exhibition. Currently the Seville Archeology Museum and Popular Customs and Art Museum is located in this Plaza. It is also important to note the beautiful gardens that are found in the plaza and its surroundings.
  21. 21. 21 La Cartuja The universal exhibition of 1992 took place in this area of the city. The purpose of this exhibition was to comemorate the quincentenary of the discovery of América. These exhibitions were initiated in London in 1851 and continue to be celebrated. The last universal exhibition was in Yeosu, South Korea in 2012. This area gets its name after The Cartuja Monastery. This building was founded in 1400. It has gained a great deal of valuable artistic heritage overtime. Christopher Columbus resided in this monastery. During its vacancy in the 19th century, English businessman, Charles Pickman established a ceramic factory in the former monastery. SEVILLE OUTSKIRTS Valencina dolmenes Eight kilometers from Seville, in the region of Valencina de la Concepción, there are dolmens, which are ruins from the pre-historic era (structures made from big rocks that were used in funerals).
  22. 22. 22 The Carambolo The Carambolo Treasure dates from around the seventh-century BC. The treasure was found in 1958 in the site known as Carambolo Alto in Camas. It is related to Phoenician culture. The Roman city of Italica The ancient Roman city of Itálica is located about eight kilometers from Seville. It was one of the most important Roman provinces of Hispania. The first Roman emperor born outside of what today is Italy, Trajano, was born here in 53 B.C. .As Trajano as emperor, the Romans lived one of its most important stages in Roman history. In Italica, you can visit its archaeological amphitheater, one of the largest in the Roman world, as well as the remains of its most modern neighborhood built in the time of Emperor Adriano.The old part of the city remains located under the city of Santiponce. The most important ruins from Italica can be seen in the Archaeological Museum of Seville. Every year in the month of January, Italica celebrates an athletic competition called the International Cross Italica, one of only two cross competitions in Spain which are included in the international calendar of the IAAF (International Association of Athletics Federations).
  23. 23. 23 The Monastery of San Isidoro del Campo Very near Italica you can find the Monastery of San Isidoro del Campo, which today is uninhabited but has an important historical and artistic heritage. It is important to note that the high altarpiece of one of the two churches is considered a masterpiece of seventeenth-century altarpiece, and was made by the Andalusian sculptor Juan Martinez Montañés. Alcalá de Guadaira This town located 15 kms from Seville has one of the most important fortresses in all of Andalusia. Originally built during the Almohad Andalucía, these fortresses were reformed in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The Guadaira river passes through the town, and you can visit traditional flour mills Carmona Carmona is situated on a hill about 30 kms east of Seville and has a population of about 30,000 inhabitants. It is well-known for its historical and artistic heritage. Inhabited since ancient times as evidenced by ruins found, it was an important strategic town during the Ancient Roman times. Carmona has preserved among other things, a Roman necropolis, remains of its amphitheater, part of its city wall and numerous findings within the city center such as mosaics. Additionally, we can find ruins of the impressive ancient city doors, which was a part of the walled city. Also in the old part of the town, we can see a number of valuable buildings such as churches, convents and palaces, and a typical urban Andalucía region. On the highest part of the town, you can find remains of an ancient Muslim fortress which has been converted into a hotel..
  24. 24. 24 COMENIUS PARTICIPANTS CROATIA Zoltan Bartaky Tehcnical Education Teacher Silva Mihalj Živković Croatian Language Teacher Maja Grgić Jakov Gugić Iva Marketanović Lucija Relić Aleksandra Salontai Pavković - Special Education Teacher
  25. 25. 25 COMENIUS PARTICIPANTS GREECE Helena Christakakou German Teacher Maria Chrysantou. Teacher Filippos Papargyropoulos Nikolas Symenonides Thanos Thomopoulus Kostis Zaharopoulos
  26. 26. 26 COMENIUS PARTICIPANTS POLAND Albert Murjas English Teacher Artur de Sternberg Stojalowski Headteacher Mariusz Tomaka Teacher
  27. 27. 27 COMENIUS PARTICIPANTS TURKEY Yılmaz Gülen Headmaster Muzaffer Yılmaz German Teacher Sibel Ceylan English Teacher Aysel Merter English Teacher Hasan Hüseyin Köksal Psychological Conseling Ahmet Nuri Kelle Teacher Ahmet Baran Kavak Student Mehmet Şahin Mazan Student Başar Deniz Ünal Student Irmak Kelle Student Beyza Güler Student Merve Tüncer Student
  28. 28. 28 COMENIUS PARTICIPANTS SPAIN Francisco Barea Durán Headteacher Mercedes Romero Gil Secretary Diego Martín Balsera Deputy Headteacher Pablo Carrasquilla Quintana Bilingual Coordinator Beatriz Maqueda Gorjón Bilingual Coordinator Mª Carmen Ocete Martínez English Teacher Carmen de Torres Bilingual Teacher Carolina Antón Dobarro Bilingual Teacher MariPaz Delgado Reina Bilingual Teacher Rocío Moreno P.E. Bilingual Teacher Isabel García- Cernuda Bilingual Teacher Antonia Risalde Moya Bilingual Teacher
  29. 29. 29 Estefanía Ortigosa Jiménez Bilingual Teacher Teresa Jiménez Vaca English Teacher Ana Cuadros Hoyo Bilingual Teacher Juan Caballero Millán Teacher Gloria Palomo García Teacher Rosario González Domínguez Teacher Mª Aurora Bohórquez Ortega Teacher Pilar Ortiz Cañete Bilingual Teacher Marina Ruiz Pérez Special Education Teacher Pilar Subirat Gómez Autistic Children´s Teacher María Bella Rodero Castillo Autistic Children´s Teacher Pilar García Díaz Religión Teacher David Fuentes Moreno Teacher Ignacio Coca Blanes English Teacher Esther Ávila Campos Teacher Mickal Haile Linguistic Assistant
  30. 30. 30 SPAIN COMENIUS PROGRAMME 26 – 30 MAY 2014 MONDAY 26TH MAY 2014 MAIRENA DEL ALJARAFE Spaces Responsibles 9:00 Meeting in Maese Rodrigo Residence Pablo, Mª Carmen and Paco School – Official Programme 9:30-10:00 Sightseeing of “Giner de los Ríos School” Pablo, Mª Carmen and Paco 10:00- 11:00 -Workshop: An archeology approach for children (students). Pre-School Playground Pablo -Quick view of lessons to observe methodological aspects in our classes. The visit will be in small groups (teachers). 4 years old B, 1st course A, P. E. Class (Gym), 5th course A Paco and Mikal 11:00- 12:00 -Workshop: Traditional Ceramic (students). Multi-Purpose Room ( Pre- School) Mª Carmen -Tourist brochure presentation (teachers). Multi-Purpose Room (Primary) Maripaz and Pablo 12:00- 12:30 Social hour with our students and teachers. Multi-Purpose Room (Primary) or Staffroom Free Teachers
  31. 31. 31 12:30- 13:30 Visiting the Town Hall of Mairena del Aljarafe: -Meet our town Mayor. Pablo, Mª Carmen and Paco 14:00- 16:00 Lunch at “Verde Flojito”. Pablo, Mª Carmen and Paco + … 16:00 Short break at the hotel. 16:00 Turkish Arrival at Santa Justa Station Pablo, Paco y … 18:00- 22:00 Sightseeing of Triana neighbourhood. Dinner at Triana: SOL Y SOMBRA. Pablo, Mª Carmen and Paco + … TUESDAY 27TH MAY 2014 SEVILLA 8:45 We start the visit at Puerta de Jerez Station. Maripaz, Juan y Mikal 8:45-10 Visual tour: -Palacio de San Telmo. -University of Sevilla. -Archivo de Indias. -Virgen de los Reyes Square (Giralda). -Town Hall and San Francisco square. 10.00- 10:40 -Bellas Artes Museum (building and specific pictures) 11.00- 12:30 -Alcázar. 12:45- 15:00 -El Salvador - (If we have enough time: building in mármoles street, roman cistern (tank), Galindo street). -Cathedral 15:00- 17:30 -Lunch: PANDO From 17:30 to 20:00 -Arenal Tour: City walls, Torre de la Plata, Torre del Oro (towers), historic harbour, Bullring, Hospital de la Caridad, Atarazanas, Postigo del Aceite.
  32. 32. 32 -Jewish neighbourhood: Santa Cruz neighbourhood and San Bartolomé if it’s possible. -María Luisa Park and Spain Square. 21:00 Dinner at Maese Rodrigo WEDNESDAY 28TH MAY 2014 HUELVA 9:15 Meeting in Maese Rodrigo Residence. We’ll take a bus to go to Huelva. Carmen de Torres, Rocío and Mickal. 10:30 Visit to the historic harbour of La Rábida where you can see a copy of the three Columbus’ caravels. 11:45 Visit to La Rábida Monastery, where Columbus prepared his first trip to América in 1492. 14:30 Special lunch in Matalascañas beach. 16.00- 18:00 Free time to enjoy the beach. 18:00- 19:30 Going back to Sevilla 19:30- 21:00 Free time for you!! 21:00 Dinner at hotel. THURSDAY 29TH MAY MAIRENA DEL ALJARAFE 9:00 Meeting in Maese Rodrigo Residence Estefanía and Gloria School – Official Programme 9:30-10:30 Sightseeing of “Almendral School” El Almendral Estefanía and Gloria 10:30- 12:00 -Workshop: Traditional Ceramic (students). Multi-Purpose Room ( Pre- School) Pablo -Prepare the next Comenius trip (teachers). Multi-Purpose Room (Primary) Mª Carmen, Carolina and Maripaz 12:00- Social hour with our students and teachers. Multi-Purpose Free
  33. 33. 33 12:30 Room (Primary) or Staffroom Teachers 12:30- 14:00 -The Wizard of Oz (Theatre by our 5th course students). Presentation of traditional folklore: -Sevillanas by 3rd, 4th and 6th course of Primary Education (songs, costumes, music and dances). -Tanguillo de Cádiz. Gym 3rd , 4th and 5th , teachers and students 14:00 Lunch at hotel. 16:00- 20:00 Break at hotel. 20:00 Andalusian Party in Giner de los Ríos School (Mothers and Fathers Association collaborate on it) -Traditional dresses. -Dances. -Typical food. We will exchange presents!! Multi-Purpose Room (Primary) Pablo, Mª Carmen and Paco + … FRIDAY 30TH MAY MAIRENA DEL ALJARAFE 9.00-14:00 We celebrate the Family’s Day in our school. This will be a social day with our students and teachers

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Seville Tourist guide

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