Lectures and presentation technology Stephen Bostock Teaching and Learning with Technology ? ?
Summary Slide - an automatic ‘agenda’ slide with hyperlinks to four ‘custom shows’ of selected slides. <ul><li>What’s the ...
What’s the use of lectures? Donald Bligh 1972  <ul><li>His review of research found that lectures </li></ul><ul><li>might ...
What’s the use of lectures? Donald Bligh 1972 <ul><li>His review of research found that lectures </li></ul><ul><li>might b...
Rethinking University Education Laurillard 1993 <ul><li>Lectures are only one educational process:  teacher transmits info...
Rethinking University Education Laurillard 1993 <ul><li>Lectures are only one educational process:  teacher transmits info...
Learning to teach in HE Ramsden 1992 <ul><li>lectures are no more  economical  than other methods in transmitting informat...
Possible uses of Lectures? <ul><li>introduce a new topic, give an overview and relate to other topics, where detailed info...
Lecturing to large groups Andreson 1990 <ul><li>faced with bigger classes and more classes,  two responses are possible fo...
Lecturing to large groups Andreson 1990 <ul><li>faced with bigger classes and more classes,  two responses are possible fo...
Lecture less but better <ul><li>Augmentation  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ lecture’ less in Lectures bring student activity int...
‘ lecture’ less in Lectures <ul><li>stop talking  and let the learners do something,  wake them up! </li></ul><ul><li>what...
<ul><li>students like well structured lectures but they also need variety to stay alert. So change the pace, activity, sty...
<ul><li>students like well structured lectures but they also need variety to stay alert. So change the pace, activity, sty...
Refinement - e.g. more efficient transmission <ul><li>give handouts of slides for accuracy  and to save time especially e....
Presentation software - advantages <ul><li>clear, legible text, good designs are easy </li></ul><ul><li>well structured, i...
Presentation software - disadvantages <ul><li>many ready-made designs are too complex and print badly </li></ul><ul><li>im...
the end
References <ul><li>Lee Andreson, Lecturing to large groups, in C. Rust, Teaching in Higher Education, 1990, SCED Paper 57,...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Whats The Use Of Lectures

2,490 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Whats The Use Of Lectures

  1. 1. Lectures and presentation technology Stephen Bostock Teaching and Learning with Technology ? ?
  2. 2. Summary Slide - an automatic ‘agenda’ slide with hyperlinks to four ‘custom shows’ of selected slides. <ul><li>What’s the use of lectures? Donald Bligh 1972 </li></ul><ul><li>Rethinking University Education Laurillard 1993 </li></ul><ul><li>Learning to teach in HE Ramsden 1992 </li></ul><ul><li>Possible uses of Lectures? </li></ul>
  3. 3. What’s the use of lectures? Donald Bligh 1972 <ul><li>His review of research found that lectures </li></ul><ul><li>might be good for: </li></ul><ul><li>transmitting information ? </li></ul><ul><li>promoting thought ? </li></ul><ul><li>changing student attitudes ? </li></ul>
  4. 4. What’s the use of lectures? Donald Bligh 1972 <ul><li>His review of research found that lectures </li></ul><ul><li>might be good for: </li></ul><ul><li>transmitting information ? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>as effective as other media </li></ul></ul><ul><li>promoting thought ? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>not effective </li></ul></ul><ul><li>changing student attitudes ? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>not very effective </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Rethinking University Education Laurillard 1993 <ul><li>Lectures are only one educational process: teacher transmits information </li></ul><ul><li>do not encourage dialogue, for example or encourage student reflection </li></ul><ul><li>‘ inspirational’ effects are rare and short-lived </li></ul><ul><li>many opportunities for student errors in getting information and making sense of it </li></ul><ul><li>lectures cannot deal with a variety of students </li></ul><ul><li>Q. why aren’t lectures scrapped? </li></ul>
  6. 6. Rethinking University Education Laurillard 1993 <ul><li>Lectures are only one educational process: teacher transmits information </li></ul><ul><li>do not encourage dialogue, for example or encourage student reflection </li></ul><ul><li>‘ inspirational’ effects are rare and short-lived </li></ul><ul><li>many opportunities for student errors in getting information and making sense of it </li></ul><ul><li>lectures cannot deal with a variety of students </li></ul><ul><li>Q. why aren’t lectures scrapped? A. 800 years of tradition </li></ul>
  7. 7. Learning to teach in HE Ramsden 1992 <ul><li>lectures are no more economical than other methods in transmitting information to large numbers </li></ul><ul><li>they are efficient , but less so than reading </li></ul><ul><li>they will ‘cover the ground’ by the teacher, but not by the student learning </li></ul><ul><li>students are passive and dependent, promoting a surface approach to learning </li></ul><ul><li>not effective for deep learning outcomes needing activity, responsibility, interaction </li></ul>
  8. 8. Possible uses of Lectures? <ul><li>introduce a new topic, give an overview and relate to other topics, where detailed information comes later </li></ul><ul><li>course administration and changes </li></ul><ul><li>social function between students and with staff </li></ul><ul><li>engage student interest, motivation, stimulate thinking, make memorable demonstrations - difficult and rare! </li></ul><ul><li>some students like lectures </li></ul>
  9. 9. Lecturing to large groups Andreson 1990 <ul><li>faced with bigger classes and more classes, two responses are possible for lectures </li></ul><ul><li>refinement as theatre: enhance style, techniques, presentation skills </li></ul><ul><li>augmentation with student activity, feedback, dialogue, using other media </li></ul>
  10. 10. Lecturing to large groups Andreson 1990 <ul><li>faced with bigger classes and more classes, two responses are possible for lectures </li></ul><ul><li>refinement as theatre: enhance style, techniques, presentation skills </li></ul><ul><li>augmentation with student activity, feedback, dialogue, using other media </li></ul>better presentations less lecturing
  11. 11. Lecture less but better <ul><li>Augmentation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ lecture’ less in Lectures bring student activity into lectures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>have fewer Lectures (no space here) replace some lectures with more independent learning, resource-based </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Refinement - lecture better use media and technology to make presentation of information more efficient </li></ul>
  12. 12. ‘ lecture’ less in Lectures <ul><li>stop talking and let the learners do something, wake them up! </li></ul><ul><li>what could they do? what have you seen or tried? </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>students like well structured lectures but they also need variety to stay alert. So change the pace, activity, style, media, ... </li></ul><ul><li>maximum attention span : ______ mins </li></ul><ul><li>divide longer periods into blocks of varied activities with breaks </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. mini lecture + problem + buzz group + plenary + elaboration/clarification </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. students read the lecture handouts in small groups (20 min) + an overview </li></ul>‘ lecture’ less - vary the activities
  14. 14. <ul><li>students like well structured lectures but they also need variety to stay alert. So change the pace, activity, style, media, ... </li></ul><ul><li>maximum attention span : 15 mins </li></ul><ul><li>divide longer periods into blocks of varied activities with breaks </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. mini lecture + problem + buzz group + plenary + elaboration/clarification </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. students read the lecture handouts in small groups (20 min) + an overview </li></ul>‘ lecture’ less - vary the activities
  15. 15. Refinement - e.g. more efficient transmission <ul><li>give handouts of slides for accuracy and to save time especially e.g. diagrams </li></ul><ul><li>give ‘semi-notes’ with important points missing, incomplete diagrams, tables, bullets - instruct to complete </li></ul><ul><li>give ‘skeleton notes’ with structure + keywords only - to fill in </li></ul>note-taking is passive, boring and inefficient - look at their notes! So, for example ...
  16. 16. Presentation software - advantages <ul><li>clear, legible text, good designs are easy </li></ul><ul><li>well structured, information in chunks </li></ul><ul><li>attractive colours, designs </li></ul><ul><li>include images, diagrams, charts </li></ul><ul><li>handouts are copies of screens but can have gaps, questions </li></ul><ul><li>use the same slides on digital projector, acetate, web pages, handouts, with different groups and locations </li></ul><ul><li>modifying presentations, reusing slides </li></ul>
  17. 17. Presentation software - disadvantages <ul><li>many ready-made designs are too complex and print badly </li></ul><ul><li>imposes modular structure of slides and bullets, can fragment an argument or story </li></ul><ul><li>drawing is time-consuming, (but images are easy) </li></ul><ul><li>all content can look the same, boring </li></ul><ul><li>keeping 2 versions for handouts and screen, or hiding some slides </li></ul><ul><li>PowerPoint has limitations and irritations </li></ul><ul><li>file sizes are large! </li></ul>
  18. 18. the end
  19. 19. References <ul><li>Lee Andreson, Lecturing to large groups, in C. Rust, Teaching in Higher Education, 1990, SCED Paper 57, ISBN 0946815178 </li></ul><ul><li>Donald Bligh, What’s the use of lectures? Exeter: Intellect, 1998, 5th ed. </li></ul><ul><li>Diana Laurillard, Rethinking University Education, 1993, Routledge, ISBN 0-415-09289-2 </li></ul><ul><li>Paul Ramsden, Learning to teach in Higher Education, 1992, Routledge, ISBN 0-415-06415-5 </li></ul><ul><li>www.umist.ac.uk/apt/ for presentation technology </li></ul>

×