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General Survey and Vital SignsCognitive ObjectivesUpon completion of the lesson, the student will be able to:   1. Describ...
BP: Before assessing the blood pressure, take several steps to make sure your measurement willbe accurate. Proper techniqu...
Heart Rate: The radial pulse is commonly used to assess the heart rate. With the pads of yourindex and middle fingers, com...
BP lying down. BP sitting. BP standing up. If BP drops ≥ 20 mm Hg, orthostatic hypotension.Also, measuring BP again after ...
Paradoxical Pulse: A paradoxical pulse may be detected by a palpable decrease in the pulsesamplitude on quiet inspiration....
•   ≥35 inches for women     •   ≥40 inches for menOrBMI ≥ 25: overweightBMI ≥ 30: obeseWaist to hip ratio:Females > 0.8 a...
The student will demonstrate a complete and systematic performance of the general survey andvital signs by:   1. Demonstra...
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General survey and vital signs

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General survey and vital signs

  1. 1. General Survey and Vital SignsCognitive ObjectivesUpon completion of the lesson, the student will be able to: 1. Describe the important aspects of a general survey of the patient.The general survey begins with the first moments of the patient encounter. How do you perceivethe patient’s apparent state of health, demeanor and facial affect or expression, grooming,posture, and gait.Also includes: Height, Weight, Waist-to-Hip ratio, Temperature, Respiratory Rate, BloodPressure, Level of consciousness, Emotional status, Facial features/expression, State of health,Age, Development, Stature, Symmetry, Mobility, Mood and Affect, Speech, Conveyance ofideas, Dress/personal hygiene 2. Identify the components of measurement and vital signs and discuss the considerations for each.Weight: assessment of nutritional status, particularly sings of malnutrition. Changes in weightresult from changes in body tissues or body fluids. Rapid changes in weight, over a few days,suggest changes in body fluids, not tissues. Weight gain occurs when caloric intake exceedscaloric expenditure over time and typically appears as increased body fat. Weight gain mayreflect abnormal accumulation of body fluids, such as edema. Weight lost is an importantsymptom with many causes. Mechanisms include decreased intake of food for reasons such asanorexia, dysphagia, vomiting, and insufficient supplies of food; defective absorption ofnutrients through the GI tract, increased metabolic requirements, loss of nutrients through urine/feces/injured skin. Also includes: GI diseases and endocrine disorders.Height: assess development, health risks when combined with weight. If possible, measure thepatients height in stocking feet. Is the patient unusually short or tall? Is the build slender andlanky, muscular, or stocky? Is the body symmetric? Note the general body proportions and lookfor any deformities.Temp: For oral temperatures, choose a glass or an electronic thermometer. When using a glassthermometer, shake the thermometer down to 35°C (96°F) or below, insert it under the tongue,instruct the patient to close both lips, and wait 3 to 5 minutes. Then read the thermometer,reinsert it for a minute, and read it again. If the temperature is still rising, repeat this procedureuntil the reading remains stable. Note that hot or cold liquids, and even smoking, can alter thetemperature reading. In these situations, it is best to delay measuring the temperature for 10 to 15minutes. Due to breakage and mercury exposure, glass thermometers are giving way toelectronic thermometers.
  2. 2. BP: Before assessing the blood pressure, take several steps to make sure your measurement willbe accurate. Proper technique is important and reduces the inherent variability arising from thepatient or examiner, the equipment, and the procedure itself.STEPS TO ENSURE ACCURATE BLOOD PRESSURE MEASUREMENT: • Ideally, instruct the patient to avoid smoking or drinking caffeinated beverages for 30 minutes before the blood pressure is measured. • Check to make sure the examining room is quiet and comfortably warm. • Ask the patient to sit quietly for at least 5 minutes in a chair, rather than on the examining table, with feet on the floor. The arm should be supported at heart level. • Make sure the arm selected is free of clothing. There should be no arteriovenous fistulas for dialysis, scarring from prior brachial artery cutdowns, or signs of lymphedema (seen after axillary node dissection or radiation therapy). • Palpate the brachial artery to confirm that it has a viable pulse. • Position the arm so that the brachial artery, at the antecubital crease, is at heart level— roughly level with the 4th interspace at its junction with the sternum. • If the patient is seated, rest the arm Systolic DiastolicPre hypertension 120-139 80-89Stage 1 HTN 140-159 90-99Stage 2 HTN ≥160 ≥100When the systolic and diastolic levels fall in different categories, use the higher category. Forexample, 170/92 mm Hg is Stage 2 hypertension; 135/100 mm Hg is Stage 1 hypertension.Assessment of hypertension also includes its effects on target “end organs”—the eyes, heart,brain, and kidneys. Look for hypertensive retinopathy, left ventricular hypertrophy, andneurologic deficits suggesting stroke. Renal assessment requires urinalysis and blood tests ofrenal functionThe Hypertensive Patient with Unequal Blood Pressures in the Arms and Legs:To detect coarctation of the aorta, make two further blood pressure measurements at least once inevery hypertensive patient. Coarctation of the aorta arises from narrowing of the thoracic aorta,usually proximal but sometimes distal to the left subclavian artery. Coarctation of the aorta andocclusive aortic disease are distinguished by hypertension in the upper extremities and low bloodpressure in the legs and by diminished or delayed femoral pulses.“White coat hypertension” describes hypertension in people whose blood pressure measurementsare higher in the office than at home or in more relaxed settings, usually >140/90. Thisphenomenon occurs in 10% to 25% of patients, especially women and anxious individuals
  3. 3. Heart Rate: The radial pulse is commonly used to assess the heart rate. With the pads of yourindex and middle fingers, compress the radial artery until a maximal pulsation is detected. If therhythm is regular and the rate seems normal, count the rate for 30 seconds and multiply by 2. Ifthe rate is unusually fast or slow, however, count it for 60 seconds. The range of normal is 50-90beats per minuteRhythm: To begin your assessment of rhythm, feel the radial pulse. If there are any irregularities,check the rhythm again by listening with your stethoscope at the cardiac apex. Beats that occurearlier than others may not be detected peripherally, and the heart rate can be seriouslyunderestimated. Is the rhythm regular or irregular? If irregular, try to identify a pattern: (1) Doearly beats appear in a basically regular rhythm? (2) Does the irregularity vary consistently withrespiration? (3) Is the rhythm totally irregular?RESPIRATORY RATE AND RHYTHM:Observe the rate, rhythm, depth, and effort of breathing. Count the number of respirations in 1minute either by visual inspection or by subtly listening over the patients trachea with yourstethoscope during your examination of the head and neck or chest. Normally, adults take ~20breaths per minute in a quiet, regular pattern. An occasional sigh is normal. Check to see ifexpiration is prolonged.TEMPERATURE: The average oral temperature, usually quoted at 37°C (98.6°F), fluctuatesconsiderably. In the early morning hours, it may fall as low as 35.8°C (96.4°F), and in the lateafternoon or evening, it may rise as high as 37.3°C (99.1°F). Rectal temperatures are higher thanoral temperatures by an average of 0.4 to 0.5°C (0.7 to 0.9°F), but this difference is also quitevariable. In contrast, axillary temperatures are lower than oral temperatures by approximately 1°,but take 5 to 10 minutes to register and are generally considered less accurate than othermeasurements.Fever or pyrexia refers to an elevated body temperature. Hyperpyrexia refers to extremeelevation in temperature, above 41.1°C (106°F), while hypothermia refers to an abnormally lowtemperature, below 35°C (95°F) rectally. Rapid respiratory rates tend to increase the discrepancybetween oral and rectal temperatures. In these situations, rectal temperatures are more reliable.For oral temperatures, choose a glass or an electronic thermometer. When using a glassthermometer, shake the thermometer down to 35°C (96°F) or below, insert it under the tongue,instruct the patient to close both lips, and wait 3 to 5 minutes. Note that hot or cold liquids, andeven smoking, can alter the temperature reading. In these situations, it is best to delay measuringthe temperature for 10 to 15 minutes. Taking the tympanic membrane temperature is quick, safe,and reliable if performed properly. Make sure the external auditory canal is free of cerumen,which lowers temperature readings. Position the probe in the canal so that the infrared beam isaimed at the tympanic membrane (otherwise the measurement will be invalid). Wait 2 to 3seconds until the digital temperature reading appears. This method measures core bodytemperature, which is higher than the normal oral temperature by approximately 0.8°C (1.4°F). 3. Describe steps taken if the clinician is suspecting orthostatic hypotension.
  4. 4. BP lying down. BP sitting. BP standing up. If BP drops ≥ 20 mm Hg, orthostatic hypotension.Also, measuring BP again after 1-5 minutes of standing may catch in elderly. 4. Describe abnormalities a clinician may find when taking pulse rates and respiratory rates.Summary: • Small, weak pulses decreased stroke volume, increased peripheral vascular resistance • Large, bounding pulses increased stroke volume, decreased peripheral vascular resistance, bradycardia, branch blocks, decreased compliance of vessels. • Bisferiens pulse increased arterial pulse with a double systolic peak. Aortic stenosis, regurgitation, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. • Pulsus alternans alternates in amplitude from beat to beat even though rhythm is regular. • Left ventricular failure, and usually accompanied by a left sided S3. • Bigeminal pulse Normal heartbeat alternating with premature contraction. Can appear • to be a pulsus alternans.Normal: The pulse pressure is approximately 30-40 mm Hg. The pulse contour is smooth androunded. (The notch on the descending slope of the pulse wave is not palpable.)Small, Weak Pulses: The pulse pressure is diminished, and the pulse feels weak and small. Theupstroke may feel slowed, the peak prolonged. Causes include (1) decreased stroke volume, as inheart failure, hypovolemia, and severe aortic stenosis, and (2) increased peripheral resistance, asin exposure to cold and severe congestive heart failure.Large, Bounding Pulses: The pulse pressure is increased, and the pulse feels strong andbounding. The rise and fall may feel rapid, the peak brief. Causes include (1) increased strokevolume, decreased peripheral resistance, or both, as in fever, anemia, hyperthyroidism, aorticregurgitation, arteriovenous fistulas, and patent ductus arteriosus; (2) increased stroke volumebecause of slow heart rates, as in bradycardia and complete heart block; and (3) decreasedcompliance (increased stiffness) of the aortic walls, as in aging or atherosclerosis.Bisferiens Pulse: A bisferiens pulse is an increased arterial pulse with a double systolic peak.Causes include pure aortic regurgitation, combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and, thoughless commonly palpable, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.Pulsus Alternans: The pulse alternates in amplitude from beat to beat even though the rhythm isbasically regular (and must be for you to make this judgment). When the difference betweenstronger and weaker beats is slight, it can be detected only by sphygmomanometry. Pulsusalternans indicates left ventricular failure and is usually accompanied by a left-sided S3.Bigeminal Pulse: This disorder of rhythm may mimic pulsus alternans. A bigeminal pulse iscaused by a normal beat alternating with a premature contraction. The stroke volume of thepremature beat is diminished in relation to that of the normal beats, and the pulse varies inamplitude accordingly.
  5. 5. Paradoxical Pulse: A paradoxical pulse may be detected by a palpable decrease in the pulsesamplitude on quiet inspiration. If the sign is less pronounced, a blood pressure cuff is needed.Systolic pressure decreases by more than 10 mm Hg during inspiration. A paradoxical pulse isfound in pericardial tamponade, constrictive pericarditis (though less commonly), andobstructive lung disease.Respiratory:Normal: The respiratory rate is about 14-20 per min in normal adults and up to 44 per min ininfants.Slow Breathing (Bradypnea)Sighing Respiration: Breathing punctuated by frequent sighs should alert you to the possibilityof hyperventilation syndrome—a common cause of dyspnea and dizziness. Occasional sighs arenormal.Rapid Shallow Breathing (Tachypnea)Cheyne-Stokes Breathing: Periods of deep breathing alternate with periods of apnea (nobreathing). Children and aging people normally may show this pattern in sleep.Obstructive Breathing: In obstructive lung disease, expiration is prolonged because narrowedairways increase the resistance to air flow.Rapid Deep Breathing (Hyperpnea, Hyperventilation)Ataxic Breathing (Biots Breathing): Ataxic breathing is characterized by unpredictableirregularity. Breaths may be shallow or deep, and stop for short periods. 5. Discuss and give examples of the term "differential diagnosis".Symptoms and signs may point to a number of possible causes, which should be ruled out.Common Symptom Guide can help with differential diagnosis. For instance, a cough may becaused by these and other factors: Hx pulmonary infections, cardiovascular disease, chroniclung disease, tuberculosis, asthma, AIDS, gastrointestinal reflux, acute infection, cancer. 6. Discuss the significance of the Body Mass Index (BMI) waist-to hip-ratio and waist measurement and how it is utilized in clinical practice.Use your measurements of height and weight to calculate the Body Mass Index, or BMI. Bodyfat consists primarily of adipose in the form of triglycerides and is stored in subcutaneous, inter-abdominal, and intramuscular fat deposits that are difficult to measure directly. The BMIincorporates estimated but more accurate measures of body fat than weight alone. Note that BMIcriteria for overweight and obesity are not rigid cutpoints but guidelines for estimating increasingrisks to patient health and well-being from both excess and low weight.If the BMI is 35 or higher, measure the patients waist circumference. With the patient standing,measure the waist just above the hip bones. The patient may have excess body fat if the waistmeasures:
  6. 6. • ≥35 inches for women • ≥40 inches for menOrBMI ≥ 25: overweightBMI ≥ 30: obeseWaist to hip ratio:Females > 0.8 and Males >1.0 have increased risk of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, stroke, ischemicheart disease. 7. Discuss general recommendations for conducting the physical exam.Preparing for the Physical Examination • Reflect on your approach to the patient. • Adjust the lighting and the environment -> Tangential lighting is optimal for inspecting structures such as the jugular venous pulse, the thyroid gland, and the apical impulse of the heart. It casts light across body surfaces that throws contours, elevations, and depressions, whether moving or stationary, into sharper relief. • Make the patient comfortable. • Check your equipment. • Choose the sequence of examination. 8. Verbalize the importance of hand washing as a primary means of infection control.Prevent from the spread of infectious disease. This will show your concern for the patientswelfare and display your awareness of a critical component of patient safety.Clinical Objectives
  7. 7. The student will demonstrate a complete and systematic performance of the general survey andvital signs by: 1. Demonstrating appropriate hand washing prior to examination of a patient. 2. Correctly demonstrating the techniques for obtaining measurements and vital signs (temperature, pulse, respirations, and blood pressure, including orthostatic VS). 3. Identifying normal expected findings for height, weight, and BMI measurements and vital signs. 4. Performing a general survey as part of the physical exam.

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