68th annmt 03invite

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Each autumn, the Foundation hosts an Annual Meeting of Foundation Members (key stakeholders) and other constituents. Beginning in 2002, I've been charged with creating an event theme idea, to serve as the message platform for the event. Part of this concept development is drafting content for the event invitation booklet. This upload represents the content that I wrote and edited for the 68th Annual Meeting in 2003. The graphic design was developed by a vendor.

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68th annmt 03invite

  1. 1. E X P L O R I N G THE UNIVERSITY’S LIBRARIES S I X T Y- E I G H T H A N N U A L M E E T I N GU N I V E R S I T Y O F I L L I N O I S F O U N D AT I O N
  2. 2. TRADITION AND TECHNOLOGY WITH A HUMAN TOUCH cademic libraries are as much a part of cam-A pus life as the student unions—supporting teaching, research and learning—and acting as intellectual gathering places for students and faculty. Electronic information and the printedword now mingle together, as students and faculty pursuetimeless questions and the latest scholarly developments.In broad terms, libraries speak to who we are and how we gotthat way, helping us to trace civilization’s path and outlineboth our commonalities, and our differences, as people.Libraries establish equity in knowledge access, creating anequal playing field relative to information acquisition andutilization by a society’s members. Today’s libraries often actas cultural centers, providing training and technical assistance,presenting personal networking opportunities for their patrons,offering access to diverse information through a variety oftechnologies and of course, granting continued admittance tothe world of the printed word.Our University libraries have long been home to special col-lections, distinctive groupings of cultural and sociologicalartifacts that provide insight into societies and their historyand events in a unique manner. These special collections canbe found in libraries throughout the University, and includediverse items ranging from handwritten diaries to politicalposters, drawings to manuscripts, photos to rare books. TheUniversity of Illinois Library at Urbana-Champaign, for 1
  3. 3. example, houses one of the foremost collections of H.G. Wells’letters and manuscripts, as well as the papers of Carl Sandburg,American poet and author. An exemplar of a collection usedby all serious Milton scholars, the Milton collection at theUniversity Library includes over 100 seventeenth-centuryeditions of Milton, with more than 3,000 volumes of latereditions and works of criticism. The University Library atUIUC also cares for one of the nation’s largest and most val-ued collections of books printed prior to 1501. UIC’sUniversity Library, the largest public research library in theChicago metropolitan area, houses the archives of manyChicago political figures and will add the Richard J. DaleyPapers that were donated to UIC in 2002. The BrookensLibrary at the University of Illinois at Springfield manages anIllinois Regional Archives Depository, preserving county andmunicipal records collected from 14 central Illinois counties,dating from 1817 to the present, and has a large oral historycollection, capturing the memories of Illinois citizens aboutearlier times.The principal purpose for our University of Illinois librariesin Chicago, Springfield and Urbana-Champaign is researchsupport—there is a vigorous and symbiotic relationship that
  4. 4. exists between academic libraries and research. Our librariesat Illinois are regarded around the state, nation and world asexceptional research resources, both on location at each campus,and online, with journal articles and other resources availablein dorm rooms, faculty offices, homes—and even when travel-ing abroad.But, libraries, like technology, require the human element tofully come to life. The explosion in information and the tech-nologies used to generate and disseminate it has increased theneed for librarians. Vast quantities of information are nowreadily available, but it takes information management expertiseto skillfully navigate the floodtide of data. Information literacyis an essential survival skill in the Information Age. Teachingstudents to be critical consumers of information, promotingand advancing lifelong learning behaviors, making meaningfulcurriculum connections for students, these activities describea typical workday for our University of Illinois librarians.Building extensive collections, supporting talented people andpreserving in perpetuity of invaluable, timeless informationand cultural resources... private support from our generousdonors provides the extra margin of excellence needed toaccelerate strategic Library initiatives and bring importantUniversity Library projects related to collections, people andpreservation to successful completion. University of Illinois Libraries—bringing together current and future readers, writers, researchers, scholars and lifelong learners 3
  5. 5. W O R L D M A P D O N AT E D I N N O V E M B E R 2 0 0 2 B Y R I C H A R D L . A N D E I L E E N D . S C H N E I D E RT O B E PA R T O F T H E F R A N K O . S C H N E I D E R C O L L E C T I O N O F M A P S A N D AT L A S E S ,RARE BOOK AND SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY, UIUC.
  6. 6. T H E M A P — N OVA T OT I U S T E R R A R U M O R B I S G E O G R A P H I C A AC H Y D R O G R A P H I C AT A B U L A — W A S P U B L I S H E D B Y W I L L E M J . B L A E U I N A M S T E R D A M , 16 4 8 .
  7. 7. SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES S I X T Y- E I G H T H A N N U A L M E E T I N G October 9-10-11, 2003 Champaign-UrbanaT H U R S D AY , O C T O B E R 96 : 0 0 P. M . F O U N D AT I O N C O C K TA I L B U F F E T R E C E P T I O N Until 9:00 p.m. Assembly Hall, Arena 1800 S. First St., Champaign Hosted by Foundation Chairman and Mrs. Louis A. Friedrich; Foundation President and Mrs. Sidney S. Micek; and, University President and Mrs. James J. Stukel. Business CasualF R I D A Y , O C T O B E R 108:00 A.M. R E G I S T R AT I O N A N D C O N T I N E N TA L B R E A K FA S T Krannert Center, Lobby 500 S. Goodwin, Urbana9:00 A.M. 6 8 T H A N N U A L U O F I F O U N D AT I O N BUSINESS MEETING Krannert Center, Tryon Festival Theatre WELCOME Louis A. Friedrich and Sidney S. Micek THE UNIVERSITY’S YEAR-IN-REVIEW 7
  8. 8. S C H E D U L E O F A CT I V IT I E S P R E S E N TAT I O N O F F O U N D AT I O N M E M B E R S AND ELECTION OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS Michael T. Tokarz, Chairman, Nominating Committee A N N U A L F I N A N C I A L R E P O R T O F P R I VAT E G I V I N G T H R O U G H T H E F O U N D AT I O N A N D T O T H E U N I V E R S I T Y Stephen K. Rugg, Chief Financial Officer, University of Illinois, and Treasurer, U of I Foundation T R A D I T I O N A N D T E C H N O L O G Y : 13 5 Y E A R S OF EXCELLENCE IN U OF I LIBRARIES S TAT E O F T H E U N I V E R S I T Y A N D SPECIAL GIFT ANNOUNCEMENTS University President James J. Stukel11 : 3 0 A . M . F O U N D AT I O N L U N C H E O N Illini Union, Illini Rooms A-B-C and South Lounge Until 12:30 p.m. P R E S E N TAT I O N O F T H E W I L L I A M E . W I N T E R AWA R D F O R O U T S TA N D I N G A D V O C AT E L E A D E R S H I P George J. Kottemann, Chair, The Presidents Council PRESERVING A LIBRARY’S PREEMINENCE Paula T. Kaufman, University Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 8
  9. 9. S C H E D U L E O F A CT I V IT I E S1 : 0 0 P. M . D E D I C A T I O N O F 10 - M I L L I O N T H V O L U M E IN THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Marshall Gallery, Main Library, 1408 W. Gregory, Urbana Urbana-Champaign Chancellor Nancy Cantor, presiding The 10-millionth volume acquired by the University Library at Urbana-Champaign has been procured by a private gift from longtime University of Illinois supporters Alan M. and Phyllis W. Hallene of Moline. The Hallenes gift in excess of $1 million announced in 1995 made possible the Hallene Gateway Plaza, the eastern entrance to the Urbana campus that features the stone portal from historic University Hall built in 1871. Previously, the Hallenes generosity provided more than three-quarters of a million dollars for unrestricted use and support for 10 faculty members named as Alan M. Hallene University Scholars. In November 2002, the Hallenes made a six-figure gift toward the future Alumni Center in Urbana. Named for them will be the second-floor Presidents Suite conference room that will overlook Hallene Gateway Plaza. Alan and Phyllis Hallene graduated from the U of I in 1951 with degrees from the colleges of Engineering and Liberal Arts and Sciences, respectively. Two of the Hallenes four children have earned Illinois degrees as well. Mr. Hallene has served as president of both the U of I Alumni Association and the U of I Foundation Board of Directors. 11
  10. 10. S C H E D U L E O F A CT I V IT I E S I N A U G U R AT I O N O F A U N I V E R S I T Y L I B R A R Y C A M PA I G N : B U I L D I N G O N A R I C H H E R I TA G E Chancellor Nancy Cantor and Fred F. Guyton Jr., Chairman, University Library Campaign Steering Committee TOURS OF THE LIBRARY Until 3:00 p.m.6 : 0 0 P. M . C H A M PA G N E R E C E P T I O N A N D MEMBERSHIP DINNER Krannert Center, Lobby9 : 0 0 P. M . SONGSTRESS DENA VERMETTE AND FRIENDS9 : 3 0 P. M . DESSERT BUFFET, COFFEE AND CORDIALS Until 11:00 p.m.S A T U R D A Y , O C T O B E R 1110 : 3 0 A . M . PRE-GAME BRUNCH Krannert Center, Lobby Hosted by University President and Mrs. James J. Stukel and Urbana-Champaign Chancellor Nancy Cantor and Dr. Steven Brechin1 : 0 0 P. M . I L L I N O I S V S . M I C H I G A N S TAT E Memorial Stadium, Zuppke Field Note: Game kick-off time may be affected by television coverage. NCAA regulations prohibit sale or gifting of game tickets. 12
  11. 11. S C H E D U L E O F A CT I V IT I E SSPECIAL SESSIONS D E D I C AT I O N O F N A S A S C I E N T I S T ’ S C O L L E C T I O N T H U R S D AY , O C T O B E R 9 , AT 1 : 0 0 P. M . Reading Room, Grainger Engineering Library Information Center 1301 W. Springfield, Urbana The collection of John C. Houbolt, former chief aeronautical scientist at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, has been gifted by this pioneer in America’s space program and University of Illinois graduate to the University Library. Houbolt is best known for developing and promoting the lunar-orbit rendezvous concept that facilitated Apollo 11, the nation’s first lunar landing mission. His papers, manuscripts, models, designs and books will be managed by the University Archives. Books in the Houbolt collection will be held in the Grainger Engineering Library Information Center. A grant from NASA’s Langley Research Center will enable the University Library to process, index and preserve the collection, and to help in developing an electronic finding aid for the materials and online access to many documents. 15
  12. 12. S C H E D U L E O F A CT I V IT I E SJohn Houbolt received his bachelor’s andmaster’s degrees in civil engineering at Illinoisin 1940 and 1942.His papers will help scholars understand theengineering infrastructure of both space flightand conventional aviation, and it will give theminsight into the process of research projectmanagement.F O U N D AT I O N B O A R D O F D I R E C T O R S M E E T I N GF R I D A Y , O C T O B E R 10 , A T 2 : 0 0 P . M .Harker Hall, Executive Conference RoomH O S P I TA L I T Y C E N T E RF R I D A Y , O C T O B E R 109:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.Harker Hall, Second Floor Conference RoomI N F O R M AT I O N D E S KS A T U R D A Y , O C T O B E R 118:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m.Harker Hall, Reception Lobby 16
  13. 13. ( B AC K C OV E R ) " R O S A D I B U S S O L A " ( C O M PA S S R O S E ) ,D E TA I L F R O M TAV O L A S F E R I C A P U B L I S H E D B YG I O V A N N I M A R I A C A S S I N I I N R O M E , 17 8 8 - 17 9 5 .P H OT O G R A P H Y : DON HAMERMAN AND RON GORDONG LO B A L I C O N : PA U L YO U N G

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