Protest, Resistance, and Violence

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Brief presentation about the conflicts leading up to the Civil War over the Kansas-Nebraska Act

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Protest, Resistance, and Violence

  1. 1. Section 10.2
  2. 2. Missouri Compromise  States admitted in pairs, one slave, one free  36˚ 30’ line will divide new states and territories between north (free) and south (slave)  Congress decides fate of slavery Compromise of 1850  POPULAR SOVEREIGNTY would decide about slavery in New Mexico and Utah Territories  States will decide fate of slavery
  3. 3.  fugitives not permitted a trial by jury  could not testify on their own behalf  just a statement from the slave-owner was needed for a slave to be returned  $10 was offered when fugitives were returned  those found helping a fugitive had to pay $1000 fine and serve six months in prison
  4. 4. Response to the Fugitive Slave Act 1. some organized committees to send endangered African Americans to Canada (Underground Railroad)
  5. 5. Response to the Fugitive Slave Act 2. Some resorted to violence to rescue fugitive slaves 3. some northern states passed PERSONAL LIBERTY LAWS which forbade the imprisonment of runaway slaves and guaranteed they would have jury trials
  6. 6. Uncle Tom’s Cabin  written by Harriet Beecher Stowe  novel about the escape of a slave and the death of another  excited emotions in both the North and the South
  7. 7. Missouri Compromise  States admitted in pairs, one slave, one free  36˚ 30’ line will divide new states and territories between north (free) and south (slave)  Congress decides fate of slavery Kansas-Nebraska Act  Nebraska Territory divided in two: Kansas & Nebraska  Missouri Compromise repealed  Popular Sovereignty to determine fate of slavery in both territories
  8. 8.  After the Kansas-Nebraska Act was passed both sides poured into Kansas to strengthen their numbers and cause  1855 Kansas had enough settlers to hold an election  “border ruffians” from Missouri came into the state to throw the election and succeeded
  9. 9. “Sack of Lawrence” (Anti-Slavery Settlement)  Pro-slavery grand jury condemned Lawrence inhabitants as traitor and called on local sheriff to arrest them  Pro-slavery posse of 800 men swept into Lawrence, burnt down the anti-slavery head quarters, destroyed two newspapers’ printing presses, looted many horses and stores
  10. 10. “Pottawatomie Massacre” (Pro-Slavery Settlement)  John Brown and followers pulled 5 men from their beds and killed them with swords  Dozens of incidents in Kansas followed  “Bleeding Kansas”
  11. 11. “Pottawatomie Massacre” (Pro-Slavery Settlement)  MA Senator Charles Sumner gives impassioned speech (“The Crimes Against Kansas”)for 2 days  Verbally attacked his colleagues for supporting slavery – he was particularly harsh toward Andrew Butler of SC  Congressman Preston Brooks comes over to the Senate chamber and takes up the honor of Butler (uncle) and SC and beats Sumner repeatedly about the head with his cane
  12. 12. 1) Which is NOT an element of the photograph? a) large baskets of cotton b) a cotton field c) a cotton gin d) shoulder bags of cotton This photograph, entitled “Slave family picking cotton in the fields near Savannah,” depicts the working conditions experienced by many enslaved persons in the South.
  13. 13. 2) What noticeable contrast do you observe within the family in the photograph? a) their ages b) their work assignments c) their style of clothing d) None of the above This photograph, entitled “Slave family picking cotton in the fields near Savannah,” depicts the working conditions experienced by many enslaved persons in the South.
  14. 14. 3) What would NOT be part of the description of the family in the photograph? a) worn and stained clothing b) wide-brimmed hats c) a child touching a basket of cotton d) an adult talking to an overseer This photograph, entitled “Slave family picking cotton in the fields near Savannah,” depicts the working conditions experienced by many enslaved persons in the South.
  15. 15. 4) After viewing this photograph, a northern viewer would probably conclude that slavery was a) harsh and oppressive. b) difficult but civilizing. c) challenging but rewarding. d) None of the above. This photograph, entitled “Slave family picking cotton in the fields near Savannah,” depicts the working conditions experienced by many enslaved persons in the South.
  16. 16. Slavery has been described as “difficult but civilizing.” Evaluate this statement and explain. This photograph, entitled “Slave family picking cotton in the fields near Savannah,” depicts the working conditions experienced by many enslaved persons in the South.

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