The Changing Face of Tertiary Education

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A presentation given at a DELFA event to recognise the first group of foundation associate members.

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  • Massey over25 = 46%Auckland over 25 = 23%Otago over 25 = 19%
  • UnemploymentIn 2009, with an average annual unemployment rate of 7.9% for individuals ages 25 and older, unemployment had risen sharply for all levels of educational attainment. The 4.6% unemployment rate for those with at least a four-year college degree was 5.1 percentage points lower than the 9.7% unemployment rate for high school graduates. In 1999 and 2000, with low overall unemployment rates of 4.0% and 4.2%, respectively, the gap between the unemployment rates for college graduates and high school graduates was 1.7 percentage points.From 1992 through 2009, the annual unemployment rate for individuals with some college but less than a four-year degree was between 0.7 and 1.7 percentage points lower than the unemployment rate for high school graduates.
  • SmokingSmoking rates in the United States increased in the 1940s, leveled off at about 45% in the 1950s, and began a steady decline in the late 1960s. College graduates were at least as likely as others to smoke before the medical consensus on the dangers of smoking became clear.By 1970, when information was widespread and clear public warnings were mandatory, the smoking rate among college graduates had declined to 37%, while 44% of high school graduates smoked.Over the decade from 1998 to 2008, the smoking rate continued to decline rapidly for adults with at least some college experience, but more slowly for others. The percentage of four-year college graduates who smoked declined from 14% to 9%, while the rate for high school graduates declined from 29% to 27%.In 2008, only 6% of adults with advanced degrees smoked, and half of them reported trying to stop smoking in 2008.Among smokers with some college, an associate degree, or a bachelor’s degree, 46% to 48% of smokers tried to stop. Forty-one percent of high school graduates and 44% of adults with less than a high school diploma reported making this effort.
  • ObesityWhile the frequency of obesity is lower among adults with some college education than among high school graduates, for each age group the gap is largest between those with a bachelor’s degree and those with some college or an associate degree. Differences in obesity rates by education level persist through middle age but narrow considerably at older ages. For example, among 35- to 44-year-olds, 23% of four-year college graduates and 37% of high school graduates were obese in 2008. Among those 65 or older, 24% of four-year college graduates and 28% of high school graduates were obese.Within each household education level, obesity rates are higher for children ages 6 to 11 than for children ages 2 to 5. The frequency of obesity among the children from high school graduate households increases from 14% between the ages of 2 and 5 to 22% between the ages of 6 and 11. The frequency of obesity among the children from four-year college graduate households increases from 6% between the ages of 2 and 5 to 14% between the ages of 6 and 11.Within each education level, obesity rates are either about the same or slightly lower for children ages 12 to 19 than for children ages 6 to 11.
  • VotingIn the 2008 presidential election, the gap between the voting rates of individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree and those with a high school education was smallest among older voters. Among individuals ages 75 and older, there was an 11 percentage point gap between the voting rates of four-year college graduates and high school graduates. Among individuals ages 65 to 74, there was a 15 percentage point gap.In the 2008 presidential election, the gap between the voting rates of individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree and those with a high school education was largest among younger voters. Among individuals ages 25 to 44, there was a 32 percentage point gap between the voting rates of four-year college graduates and high school graduates. The voting rate gap for individuals ages 18 to 24 was 30 percentage points.The gap between the voting rates of individuals with some college or an associate degree and those with a high school education ranged from a 10 percentage point difference for those age 75 and over to a 19 percentage point gap for those ages 25 to 44, among whom 64% of those with some college or an associate degree and 45% of high school graduates voted.
  • • Access to the first year• Access to mid career professionals• Access to second chance learners• Access for cultural reasons
  • • Access to the first year• Access to mid career professionals• Access to second chance learners• Access for cultural reasons
  • • Access to the first year• Access to mid career professionals• Access to second chance learners• Access for cultural reasons
  • The Changing Face of Tertiary Education

    1. 1. The Changing Face of Tertiary Education:How Blended, Online and Open Learning is Changing the Game Professor Mark Brown Director, National Centre for Teaching and Learning Director, Distance Education and Learning Futures Alliance
    2. 2. DELFA event… • Innovation hub • Global think tank • Networked community • Interdisciplinary development • Engine for new learning futures • International Advisory Board http://delfa.massey.ac.nz
    3. 3. The Changing Face of Tertiary Education:How Blended, Online and Open Learning is Changing the Game Professor Mark Brown Director, National Centre for Teaching and Learning Director, Distance Education and Learning Futures Alliance
    4. 4. Why this presentation…
    5. 5. Why this presentation…
    6. 6. Why this presentation…
    7. 7. Why this presentation… http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/pub7203i.pdf
    8. 8. Why this presentation… http://theconversation.edu.au/
    9. 9. Why this presentation… Manawatu Standard (22nd September, 2012)
    10. 10. Why this presentation… “We use to talk more before someone invented fire”
    11. 11. Three key questions…
    12. 12. Three key questions… 1. What are the benefits of tertiary education? 2. How is the face of tertiary education changing? 3. How should Massey University respond to the „new game‟?
    13. 13. 46% of Massey students over 25
    14. 14. 1. The benefits…
    15. 15. 1. The benefits… http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=10837419
    16. 16. Personal earning benefits New Zealand
    17. 17. Personal earning benefits New Zealand
    18. 18. 2012 Graduate Destination Survey
    19. 19. Of those earning $100K+, 85% were either block or distance students
    20. 20. In all OECD countries, tertiary graduates are more likely to be in work than non-graduates New Zealand
    21. 21. US Unemployment Rates Among Individuals Ages 25 and Older, by Education Level, 1992–2009Source: The College Board, Education Pays 2010
    22. 22. What are the wider social, culturalandeconomic benefits oftertiaryeducationto the nation?How does Massey Universitycontribute to these benefits?
    23. 23. A third of GPD growth is related to labour income growth at the tertiary level New Zealand
    24. 24. New Zealand
    25. 25. New Zealand
    26. 26. Adults with higher levels of educational attainment are more likely toshow higher levels of civic engagement and exhibit greater satisfactionwith life..
    27. 27. Scott, 2010… http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/tertiary_education/78889
    28. 28. Education level positively associated with… • Higher income (strongly) and rates of employment (moderately) • Higher economic standard of living (moderately) • How healthy you think you are, and not being a smoker (both strongly) • Higher tolerance of immigrants, different values, ways of living, and ethnic diversity (moderately to strongly) • Volunteering (moderately) • Whether you voted (moderately for NZ-born only) • Whether you lived in a household that recycles (moderately) • Overall satisfaction with life (weakly to moderately)
    29. 29. In the US… http://trends.collegeboard.org/education_pays
    30. 30. Smoking Rates Among Individuals Ages 25 and Older, by Education Level, 1940–2008
    31. 31. Obesity Rates Among Adults Ages 25 and Older, by Age and Education Level, 2008
    32. 32. Volunteering Rates Among U.S. Citizens,by Age and Education Level, 2008
    33. 33. In sum…“The evidence is overwhelming that higher educationimproves people‟s lives, makes our economy more efficient, andcontributes to a more equitable society. The existing gaps inparticipation and success are detrimental not only to individuallives, but also to society as a whole.
    34. 34. In sum…“The evidence is overwhelming that higher educationimproves people‟s lives, makes our economy more efficient, andcontributes to a more equitable society. The existing gaps inparticipation and success are detrimental not only to individuallives, but also to society as a whole.Different pathsare appropriate for different individuals, and ourchallenge is to make the most promising paths readily available tostudents from all backgrounds. We will all be better off if wecontinue to make progress in this direction” (Education Pays, 2010, p.9).
    35. 35. At Massey…Expanding access to tertiary education through differentpathways has always been central to our mission.
    36. 36. At Massey…Expanding access to tertiary education through differentpathways has always been central to our mission.More than any modern-era New Zealand university we arecommitted to promoting development and life-longlearning.
    37. 37. At Massey…Expanding access to tertiary education through differentpathways has always been central to our mission.More than any modern-era New Zealand university we arecommitted to promoting development and life-longlearning.Massey understands the transformative potentialoftertiaryeducation for inspiring people to better themselves,forbuilding capacityfor change withincommunities and forpromoting wider societal benefits.
    38. 38. “Distance Education……it has made me the person I am today, a productive workingwoman in her late forties contributing to society. I was in my early tomiddle thirties when I found distance education and… it was a godsendto enable me to make my life and my son‟s life a much better one inthe long term. I wanted to better myself by studying while on a benefitand not being able to afford childcare, distance education was the bestway of making my life better.
    39. 39. “Distance Education……it has made me the person I am today, a productive workingwoman in her late forties contributing to society. I was in my early tomiddle thirties when I found distance education and… it was a godsendto enable me to make my life and my son‟s life a much better one inthe long term. I wanted to better myself by studying while on a benefitand not being able to afford childcare, distance education was the bestway of making my life better.I am now employed by a government department in a role helpingvictims in the community. I am now in a position that I am not relianton a benefit and not likely to need one in the future. Where would I beif distance education was not available to me? Still in the same placeas I was 12 years ago, stuck on a benefit with no future to speak of.Now I am… proof that it‟s possible to change your life for the better byutilizing distance education”Sharon (18th Jan, 2011) http://exmss.org/presidentsblog/2011/01/18/treat-distance-students-with-respect
    40. 40. Questions… “A prudent question is one-half of wisdom.” Francis Bacon
    41. 41. 2. The changing face…
    42. 42. 2. The changing face… Blended, Online, Open (BOO)
    43. 43. 2. The changing face… How the game is changing… 2.1 Convergencebetween formal and informal learning 2.2 Emergence of new business models 2.3 Rapid growth of open learning
    44. 44. 2.1 Convergence… Who coined the term MOOC?
    45. 45. 2.1 Convergence… Who coined the term MOOC?
    46. 46. Dave Cormier in 2008… Strongly influenced by the work of this man…
    47. 47. There are over5billion searches performedon Google eachday
    48. 48. To whom were these questionsaddressed B.G.?
    49. 49. To whom were these questionsaddressed B.G.? … before Google
    50. 50. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3SuNx0UrnEo&feature=youtu.be
    51. 51. What does all this mean?A completely new type of globallyconnected learneris expecting a new typeof education for new times.
    52. 52. 2.2 Emergence… The economics of abundance New Models of New Models of Production Delivery New Models ofKnowledgeTransfer
    53. 53. New production models…
    54. 54. New models of delivery…
    55. 55. New models of knowledge transfer…
    56. 56. No = 51 THE (2011)
    57. 57. No = 181 THE (2011)
    58. 58. 2.3 Rapid growth... But wait there‟s more…
    59. 59. “It will not be possible to satisfy therising demand for HE, especially indeveloping countries, by relying ontraditionalapproaches”(Sir John Daniel, President, Commonwealth of Learning).
    60. 60. What does all this mean?The traditional universityis being chiseledaway by powerful global forces and newbusiness models as a multitudeofalternativeproviders emerge.
    61. 61. Questions… “A prudent question is one-half of wisdom.” Francis Bacon
    62. 62. 3. Massey‟s response…
    63. 63. 3. Massey‟s response… • In 2012, 85% of students rated Masseys online learning environment as good or very good in the annual Student Experience Survey. • In 2012 Massey had over 4000 individual Stream environments and in the peak months of March, April and May the login page had over half a million visits. • In 2012, up until September, there had been over 9000 hours of virtual class meetings in Connect, which equates to roughly 375 days of meetings. • Massey‟s repository of digital video contains over 3000 hours of footage which since 2007 has been viewed by people for a total of almost 250,000 hours. • In 2012, up until the end of March, there had been more than 100,000 visitors from almost 200 countries to Masseys highly acclaimed OWLL. .
    64. 64. Digital Teaching and Learning Strategy… • Stream Upgrade • Video-linked Teaching • Rich Media Learning Project • New Study Resources Policy • New Online Learning Categories • Flexible Personal Computing Trial • Pilot of Online Exams • Learning Spaces Initiatives • International Distance Education
    65. 65. Previously international students had to come to us Now we can go to them…
    66. 66. International… • Working professionals – postgraduate specializations • First year of study - undergraduate • Specific cultural groups • Cohorts of students in partnership with other institutions • Short courses Won 2011 QS Award
    67. 67. Off-shore Programmes• World Bank – MVM/MPH (Biosecurity) - South Asia- Russia• Singapore Food Technology• Vietnam English Language (DEEP) / Business Studies• Brunei Defence Studies• Asia e-University• Open Universities Australia• University of New Delhi
    68. 68. Conclusion
    69. 69. Conclusion Blended, online and distance(from BOO to BOLD) educationis a key driver for Massey‟s future successnationally and internationally.
    70. 70. Conclusion Blended, online and distance(from BOO to BOLD) educationis a key driver for Massey‟s future successnationally and internationally. Rather than sit by as a passive observer, Massey has a BOLD vision of education and our role as the engine of the new New Zealand to take what is special about us to the world.
    71. 71. Turbo charge the engine… • DELFA • International Advisory Board • Associate Members • Teaching Development • Programme Grants • Support Open Courseware • What else should we do?
    72. 72. DELFA -Associate Members • Dr Maggie Hartnett • Associate Professor Eva Heinrich • Associate Professor Lynn Jeffrey • Associate Professor David Parsons • Dr Terry Stewart • Dr Sandi Shillington
    73. 73. Final Thoughts… “Thirty years from now the big university campuses will be relics. Universities won‟t survive. It‟s as large a change as when we first got the printed book.” (Peter Drucker, Forbes, 3/10/97)
    74. 74. What happened in the past is no longer a reliable guideto the future • Learning for the future • Teachers as future makers • Leading in a climate of change http://www.ascilite.org

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