Education and the Digital World: Promise, Progress and Pain

2,143 views

Published on

Keynote presentation at e-Learning Summer School, Dublin Institute of Technology, 27th June, 2014.

Published in: Education, Technology

Education and the Digital World: Promise, Progress and Pain

  1. 1. A cutting-edge digital learning strategy Education and the Digital World: Promise, Progress and Pain Professor Mark Brown Director, National Institute for Digital Learning e-Learning Summer School Friday 27th June 2014
  2. 2. Promise, Progress, Pain… (Brown, 1998)
  3. 3. Promise, Progress, Pain…
  4. 4. Promise, Progress, Pain…
  5. 5. Promise, Progress, Pain…
  6. 6. 1. The contested terrain 2. The discourses of persuasion 3. Leading for change in painful times Education and the Digital World Outline
  7. 7. Who controls the past commands the future. Who commands the future conquers the past. (George Orwell) Salient message…
  8. 8. 1. The contested terrain
  9. 9. Liberalism Perspective Techno-centric Perspective Human-centric Perspective Demon Perspective 1. The contested terrain
  10. 10. Libertarian Perspective Techno-centric Perspective Human-centric Perspective Demon Perspective 1. The contested terrain
  11. 11. Libertarian Perspective Techno-centric Perspective Human-centric Perspective Demon Perspective Technocratic Dream Technological Determinism 1. The contested terrain
  12. 12. Techno-centric Perspective Human-centric Perspective Demon Perspective Technocratic Dream Technological Determinism Libertarian Perspective 1. The contested terrain
  13. 13. Techno-centric Perspective Human-centric Perspective Demon Perspective Technocratic Dream Technological Determinism Libertarian Perspective 1. The contested terrain Social Determinism Technocratic Nightmare
  14. 14. 1. The contested terrain
  15. 15. http://learning-reimagined.com/noam-chomsky-on-technology-learning/ 1. The contested terrain
  16. 16. (Burbles & Callister, 2000, p.6). 1. The contested terrain “Tools do not only help us accomplish (given) purposes; they may create new purposes, new ends, that were never considered before the tools made them possible. In these and other ways tools change the user: sometimes quite concretely, as when the shape of stone tools became a factor in the evolution of the human hand (…).
  17. 17. Tools may have certain intended uses and purposes, but they frequently acquire new, unexpected uses and have new, unexpected effects. What this suggests is that we never simply use tools, without the tools also “using” us” (Burbles & Callister, 2000, p.6). 1. The contested terrain “Tools do not only help us accomplish (given) purposes; they may create new purposes, new ends, that were never considered before the tools made them possible. In these and other ways tools change the user: sometimes quite concretely, as when the shape of stone tools became a factor in the evolution of the human hand (…).
  18. 18. “Cyberspace is not politically neutral. It favors the political ideals of libertarian, free-market Republicans: a highly decentralized, deregulated society with little common discourse and minimal public infrastructure” (Shenk; cited in Burbules & Callister, 2000, p.169). 1. The contested terrain
  19. 19. • a type of marketing • a financial policy for higher education • an academic labour policy • an expression of Silicon Valley values • a kind of entertainment media MOOCs are… Peters, M. (2013). Massive Open Online Courses and Beyond: the Revolution to Come. Truthout, August 17 1. The contested terrain
  20. 20. Libertarian Perspective Techno-centric Perspective Human-centric Perspective Demon Perspective Technocratic Dream Technological Determinism Social Determinism Technocratic Nightmare Critics 1. The contested terrain
  21. 21. “Given all that we know about the social complexities of technology use in education, a pessimistic stance is the most sensible, and possibly the most productive, perspective to take” (Selwyn, 2011, p.714). 1. The contested terrain
  22. 22. Three must read books… 1. The contested terrain
  23. 23. 2. The discourses of persuasion
  24. 24. “An avalanche is coming. It’s hard of course, to say exactly when. It may be sooner than we think. Certainly there is no better time than now to seek to understand what lies ahead for higher education – and to prepare” (p.8) Barber, M., Donnelly, K., & Rizvi, S. (2013). An avalanche is coming: Higher education and the revolution ahead. Institute for Public Policy Research. London. 2. The discourses of persuasion
  25. 25. “An educational change is neither natural nor normal, constant nor common as it involves a deeper struggle over who will win control of the curriculum” (Evans, 1996, p.25). 2. The discourses of persuasion
  26. 26. “It is theory that decides what we can observe…” Albert Einstein 2. The discourses of persuasion
  27. 27. Learning Society Knowledge Economy • Online learning • Blended learning • Anytime, anywhere learning E-learning • Digitial learning • Technology-enhanced learning • 2. The discourses of persuasion
  28. 28. “Frankly, all the computers and software and Internet connections in the world won’t do much good if young people don’t understand that access to new technology means… access to the new economy” (President Bill Clinton; cited in Cuban, 2001, p.18). 2. The discourses of persuasion
  29. 29. “The Digital Learning Festival will bring together these digital learning trailblazers from Ireland and abroad to… chart the way forward for the future of technology in education thus ensuring a solid base from which to launch the next phase of Ireland’s economic growth.” (EXCITED Digital Learning Festival, 2014). “Frankly, all the computers and software and Internet connections in the world won’t do much good if young people don’t understand that access to new technology means… access to the new economy” (President Bill Clinton; cited in Cuban, 2001, p.18). 2. The discourses of persuasion
  30. 30. Learning Society Knowledge Economy • Online learning • Blended learning • Anytime, anywhere learning E-learning • Digital learning • Technology-enhanced learning • Different interest groups and stakeholders borrow the same ‘language of persuasion’ to legitimize their own hegemonic agenda 2. The discourses of persuasion
  31. 31. The concept of hegemony—in which dominant groups in society seek to establish the common sense, define what counts as legitimate areas of agreement and disagreement, and shape the political agendas made public and discussed as possible—is central to peeling away the forces shaping the digital future. 2. The discourses of persuasion
  32. 32. Learning Society Knowledge Economy Reproduction • Mass education • Universal standards • Education as a commodity • Increased market competition • Online learning • Blended learning • Anytime, anywhere learning E-learning • Digital learning • Technology-enhanced learning • 2. The discourses of persuasion
  33. 33. 2. The discourses of persuasion
  34. 34. Learning Society Knowledge Economy Reschooling Reproduction • xMOOCs • Global curriculum • Real world learning • Education in change • Mass education • Universal standards • Education as a commodity • Increased market competition • Online learning • Blended learning • Anytime, anywhere learning E-learning • Digital learning • Technology-enhanced learning • 2. The discourses of persuasion
  35. 35. 2. The discourses of persuasion
  36. 36. 2. The discourses of persuasion
  37. 37. 2. The discourses of persuasion
  38. 38. 2. The discourses of persuasion
  39. 39. Learning Society Knowledge Economy Deschooling Reschooling Reproduction • xMOOCs • Global curriculum • Real world learning • Education in change • Mass education • Universal standards • Education as a commodity • Increased market competition • Online learning • Blended learning • Anytime, anywhere learning E-learning • Digital learning • Technology-enhanced learning • • Badges • Un-curriculum • Opening access • Unbundling learning 2. The discourses of persuasion
  40. 40. Page 3 Professor Mark Brown 2. The discourses of persuasion
  41. 41. 2. The discourses of persuasion
  42. 42. Page 3 Professor Mark Brown 2. The discourses of persuasion
  43. 43. Reconceptualist Learning Society Knowledge Economy Deschooling Reschooling Reproduction • Being glocal • Digital citizenship • Socially just society • Education for change • xMOOCs • Global curriculum • Real world learning • Education in change • Mass education • Universal standards • Education as a commodity • Increased market competition • Online learning • Blended learning • Anytime, anywhere learning E-learning • Digital learning • Technology-enhanced learning • • cMOOCs • Un-curriculum • Opening access • Unbundling learning 2. The discourses of persuasion
  44. 44. Learning to change and transform Learning to live together Learning to do Learning to know Learning to be Digital Inclusion Digital Citizenship Digital Identity 2. The discourses of persuasion
  45. 45. “…technological developments are unavoidably linked to broader social imaginaries: our ideas about the role of technology in education are shaped and reshaped by our ideas about what constitutes the ‘good society’ (Morgan, 2013, p.5). 2. The discourses of persuasion
  46. 46. Page 3 Professor Mark Brown • Who is telling the story? • What is the story they are telling? • What story isn’t being told? • What’s missing from the story? Key questions… 2. The discourses of persuasion
  47. 47. Page 3 Professor Mark Brown 3. Leading for change in painful times
  48. 48. “I start with the premise that the function of leadership is to produce more leaders, not more followers” — Ralph Nader. Action 1… 3. Leading for change in painful times
  49. 49. Make sure that you have the right people on the “bus” before deciding where you want to go. Jim Collins… “Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap…and Others Don’t”. Action 2… 3. Leading for change in painful times
  50. 50. Try to peel away the many competing and co-existing faces of the problematic digital futures for higher education in Ireland. 3. Leading for change in painful times Action 3…
  51. 51. Page 3 Professor Mark Brown 3. Leading for change in painful times Tensions…
  52. 52. Global Forces Knowledge Economy Restrictive Funding Traditional Culture National Work Plan New Teaching Methods Quality Assurance Sector Collaboration Public Institutions Short-term Goals Local Actions Learning Society Inclusive Funding Innovative Culture Local Compacts Old Assessment Practices Quality Enhancement Sector Competition Private Providers Long-Term Foresight 3. Leading for change in painful times
  53. 53. The salient question is not ‘where are we going?’, but rather ‘where do we want to go?’ (p.6) 3. Leading for change in painful times
  54. 54. Conclusion
  55. 55. A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking (or ran out of time) Conclusion
  56. 56. “All education springs from images of the future and all education creates images of the future. Thus all education, whether so intended or not, is a preparation for the future. Unless we understand the future for which we are preparing we may do tragic damage to those we teach.” (Toffler, 1974). Conclusion
  57. 57. Contact details… Professor Mark Brown Director, National Institute for Digital Learning mark.brown@dcu.ie @mbrownz http://www.slideshare.net/mbrownz http://www.dcu.ie/nidl

×