Content Strategy for Slow Experiences at UXLX

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Driving from Lisbon to Golega, we'll look at the opportunity to design slow experiences. Online experiences can be fast, efficient, easy, orderly—and sometimes, that’s all wrong! Users click confirm too soon, miss important details, or don’t find content that aids conversion. In short, efficient isn’t always effective. Not all experiences need to be fast to be functional. In fact, some of the most memorable and profitable web engagements employ “slow content strategy,” content speed bumps, and surprising content types that aid interaction. We’ll examine examples of content strategy in action that demonstrates how to identify and control the pace of user experience, adding value for both our users and the businesses that engage them.

Presented at User Experience Lisbon, #uxlx, 6 June 2014.

Published in: Design, Technology

Content Strategy for Slow Experiences at UXLX

  1. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 1 © 2014 Margot Bloomstein @mbloomstein #UXLX User Experience Lisbon 6 June, 2014 CONTENT STRATEGY FOR SLOW EXPERIENCES
  2. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 2 © 2014
  3. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 3 © 2014
  4. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 4 © 2014
  5. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 5 © 2014 anticipation
  6. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 6 © 2014 discovery
  7. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 7 © 2014
  8. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 11 © 2014
  9. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 12 © 2014© Scott A. Miller for Chevrolet
  10. These people are waiting in a line.
  11. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 14 © 2014
  12. These people are delighting in a line: they’re engaged, anticipating, discovering, creating memories. They’re in the moment. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 15
  13. Content affects experience… and a user’s perception of an experience. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 16
  14. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 17 © 2014 You wait longer, but you’re engaged before you get there. You’re invested in the experience. Keri Maijala (@clamhead)
  15. Content supports experiences for different media, devices, and users.
  16. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 19 © 2014 When people have a frustrating experience, they rate the checkout as slow. When we ask people what’s ‘slow,’ it’s the frustrating experiences. What’s fast? They say delightful experiences. Jared Spool (@jmspool)
  17. Frustration, not speed, drives the perception of slowness. That was horrible and it took forever, no matter how fast it was.
  18. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 21 © 2014© jonandallie.blogspot.com
  19. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 22 © 2014 Little content supports the experience and one size fits all.
  20. Is it enough just to speed it up?
  21. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 24 © 2014
  22. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 25 © 2014 Efficient isn’t always effective.
  23. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 26 © 2014 Efficient isn’t always effective.
  24. Users say frustrating activities take forever. But are time-consuming activities also inherently frustrating?
  25. © Charlotte & Kristian Septimius Krogh
  26. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 29 © 2014 Is the nature of the transaction so small and insignificant that it shouldn’t require a second thought? Don’t get in the way. Or will the consumer get to the final transaction after plenty of preliminary research? Again, don’t make them rethink it. Jared Spool (@jmspool)
  27. Users can appreciate slow experiences: they’re engaged, anticipating, creating memories. They discover, learn, and pay attention to act deliberately. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 30
  28. Why do this? • Drive exploration & discovery • Encourage deliberate choices • Focus users’ attention @mbloomstein | #uxlx 31
  29. How do you slow down users? 1. Editorial style and structures
  30. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 33 © 2014 Users can appreciate slow experiences. they’re engaged, anticipating, creating memories.
  31. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 34 © 2014 Users can appreciate slow experiences. they’re engaged, anticipating, creating memories.
  32. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 35 © 2014
  33. “Choosing a lens can be a daunting task for all of the reasons mentioned above, so I pulled together some info from my own experiences, as well as those of other Crutchfield shutterbugs.”
  34. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 37 © 2014
  35. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 38 © 2014
  36. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 40 © 2014 “Springtime shaded belays at the creek, predawn starts in the Canadian Rockies and hut tours in the High Sierra: Anywhere brisk, the Down Sweater delivers featherweight, superbly compressible warmth. The polyester ripstop shell on this down jacket does more than look sharp; it’s tear-resistant, windproof, and made from 100% polyester.”
  37. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 41 © 2014
  38. How do you slow down users? 1. Editorial style and structures 2. Discovery- and comparison- oriented content types
  39. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 43 © 2014
  40. Courage in our convictions Empirical proof
  41. ValidationDeliberation
  42. Time & space to interact with it Engaging, informative content
  43. How do you slow down users? 1. Editorial style and structures 2. Discovery- and comparison- oriented content types 3. Longform content
  44. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 51 © 2014
  45. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 53 © 2014
  46. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 54 © 2014
  47. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 55 © 2014
  48. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 56 © 2014
  49. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 57 © 2014 • Slow down • Act deliberately • Focus
  50. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 58 © 2014
  51. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 59 © 2014
  52. But does it work?
  53. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 61 © 2014 The outdoor recreation economy grew 5% annually 2005 through 2011— during an economic recession when many sectors contracted. Outdoor Industry Association Source: Outdoor Recreation Economy Report 2012; http://www.outdoorindustry.org/pdf/OIA_OutdoorRecEconomyReport2012.pdf
  54. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 62 © 2014 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 REI industry average Source: REI Financial Information reports 2005 – 2012; http://www.rei.com/about-rei/financial-information.html The outdoor recreation economy grew 5% annually… while REI averaged 11% year-over-year growth
  55. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 63 © 2014 Store growth fuels content availability
  56. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 64 © 2014 Our content strategy is pretty simple: we stay as close to our core market as possible. Patagonia’s always had a literary, storytelling component to the brand. It’s in line with what we say: buy less stuff and make sure what you buy lasts. Bill Boland, Patagonia
  57. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 65 © 2014 On a short-term basis, it doesn’t help us move product. It doesn’t meet your weekly sales goal. It’s not about short- term ROI. It’s something we enjoy and the people we build clothes for enjoy. Bill Boland, Patagonia
  58. Attention must be paid © Viking
  59. Attention must be paid but only if we can respect our users, brands, and content equally. © Viking
  60. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 68 © 2014 Be here now
  61. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 69 © 2014 Be here now
  62. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 70 © 2014 Be here now
  63. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 71 © 2014 Be here now? Are we willing to
  64. @mbloomstein | #uxlx 72 © 2014 Obrigada! Margot Bloomstein @mbloomstein margot@appropriateinc.com slideshare.net/mbloomstein amzn.to/CSatWork All Portugal photography © Margot Bloomstein; all other images property of their owners as noted.

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