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Informe con sugerencias, mejores prácticas y estudios de casos para mejorar la experiencia del usuario de comercio móvil, dando ideas de cómo el móvil se puede utilizar como parte de una estrategia multicanal más amplio.

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Sample -mobile_commerce_compendium

  1. 1. Market Data / Supplier Selection / Event Presentations / User Experience Benchmarking / Best Practice / Template Files /  Mobile Commerce Compendium A Best Practice Guide
  2. 2. Like this sample report? Access over 500 reports with Silver membership. The reason members join us - and stay with us Econsultancy’s entire research library is available to our members, providing unlimited and unrivalled access to over 500 reports (and counting). In an environment where market trends are constantly changing, gaining up to the minute insider knowledge and expertise is invaluable. Comprehensive, authoritative and easy to read, our award-winning research offers practical advice to marketers on all aspects of digital marketing and e-commerce. Best Practice Our definitive ‘how-to’ guides across key topic areas for digital marketing professionals. Market Data Statistics, facts and figurees; great for presentations! Supplier Selection Understand the market, latest trends and find the right supplier for your needs. Template Files Save time on RFPs, web and digital marketing projects. Trends and Innovation What’s happening out there, what’s new, what’s next? Whatever you need to know, you just found it Find out more about research and get access now with Silver membership Just a few of our reports... • SEO Best Practice Guide • Facebook Pages for Business Best Practice Guide • Online Video Best Practice Guide • Global Internet Statistics Compendium • RTB Buyer’s Guide • Email Marketing Platforms Buyer’s Guide • Digital Marketing Template Files • Innovation Report • Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings      To view our full range of 500+ reports, please visit econsultancy.com/reports If you’re ready to get your hands on our reports and use them for all they’re worth, we recommend becoming an Econsultancy Silver member. For more details, please visit econsultancy.com/join If you have any questions about membership, get in touch by emailing membership@econsultancy.com
  3. 3. Mobile Commerce Compendium A Best Practice Guide Econsultancy London 4th Floor, Farringdon Point 29-35 Farringdon Road London EC1M 3JF United Kingdom Telephone: +44 (0)20 7269 1450 http://econsultancy.com help@econsultancy.com Econsultancy New York Ste. 307, 350 7th Avenue New York, NY 10001 United States Telephone: +1 212 971 0630 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 Published July 2013
  4. 4. Mobile Commerce Compendium A Best Practice Guide All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 Contents Contents................................................................................. 1 1. About Econsultancy......................................................... 1 1.1. About the authors.........................................................................1 1.1.1. David Moth (lead author)........................................................ 1 1.1.2. Graham Charlton ..................................................................... 1 2. Introduction.....................................................................3 3. Mobile statistics ...............................................................4 3.1. Mobile usage and ownership ...................................................... 4 3.2. Mobile commerce........................................................................ 4 3.3. Mobile search .............................................................................. 4 4. Mobile usage survey......................................................... 5 4.1. How consumers use their smartphones ..................................... 5 4.2. Consumer use of mobile commerce............................................ 6 4.3. Barriers to mobile commerce...................................................... 8 4.4. What type of products do mobile shoppers purchase? .............. 9 4.5. Consumer expectations of retail apps ...................................... 10 4.6. Use of mobile in-store................................................................ 11 5. Mobile commerce .......................................................... 14 5.1. The importance of speed for mobile commerce........................14 5.1.1. Mobile performance and customer expectations.................. 14 5.1.2. Minimising page weight......................................................... 15 5.1.3. Speed doesn't mean ugly ....................................................... 15 5.1.4. Test for speed......................................................................... 15 5.1.5. Use a Content Distribution Network (CDN) ......................... 16 5.1.6. Avoid redirection ................................................................... 16 5.1.7. Conclusion.............................................................................. 17 5.2. How mobile-optimised sites drive conversion rates and AOVs (Average Order Values)....................................................18 5.2.1. Gifts........................................................................................ 19 5.2.2. Footwear ................................................................................ 19 5.2.3. Travel ..................................................................................... 19 5.2.4. In summary............................................................................20
  5. 5. Mobile Commerce Compendium A Best Practice Guide All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 5.3. What can we learn from Amazon’s success in mobile commerce?..................................................................................21 5.4. Why eBay’s mobile apps are so popular ................................... 26 5.5. Are mobile checkouts simple enough to capture repeat shoppers?...................................................................................30 5.6. Mobile checkouts: top 20 online retailers reviewed ................ 33 5.6.1. Essential mobile checkout features .......................................33 5.6.2. Takeaways..............................................................................43 5.7. Mobile commerce: tips for maximising conversions ............... 44 5.8. The mobile site search experience............................................48 5.9. Mobile site navigation................................................................51 6. Mobile search.................................................................58 6.1. How do mobile and desktop SEO differ, and how can you improve rankings?..................................................................... 58 6.2. Mobile search and PPC: are finance brands missing an opportunity? ..............................................................................60 6.2.1. Benefits of optimising sites for mobile search ......................60 6.2.2. Most visible sites for ‘mortgages’...........................................62 6.2.3. Most visible sites for 'insurance'............................................64 6.2.4. Most visible sites for 'loans' ...................................................65 6.2.5. Conclusion..............................................................................65 6.3. Bricks-and-mortar stores are failing to take advantage of mobile search............................................................................. 67 6.4. Optimising mobile landing pages ............................................. 74 6.5. Good and bad examples of click-to-call mobile CTAs..............80 7. Mobile as part of a multichannel strategy.....................85 7.1. B&Q’s Club app is the perfect mobile loyalty scheme.............. 85 7.2. Examples of location-based mobile campaigns .......................86 7.3. Tips for improving store locator tools ......................................89 7.3.1. Store finders: tips for implementation..................................92 7.4. How shoppers use smartphones in-store................................. 95 7.5. Should retailers offer in-store Wi-Fi?......................................101 7.5.1. Why offer Wi-Fi?.................................................................. 101 7.5.2. Why do customers find in-store Wi-Fi useful? ...................102 7.5.3. Does providing free Wi-Fi work for retailers?.....................103 7.6. How can retailers respond to the threat of showrooming? ... 104 7.7. More reasons for retailers to offer Wi-Fi in stores..................114 7.7.1. Retailers can't fight the mobile shopper...............................114 7.7.2. Wi-Fi influencing the choice of store ...................................114 7.7.3. What are consumers using in-store Wi-Fi for?....................115
  6. 6. Mobile Commerce Compendium A Best Practice Guide All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 7.7.4. What should retailers do?.....................................................115 7.8. How Evans Cycles uses QR codes in-store to deliver product details and reviews ...................................................................116 7.8.1. QR display in-store ...............................................................116 7.8.2. Landing page.........................................................................117 7.8.3. Purchase journey ................................................................. 118 7.8.4. Has Evans used QR effectively?............................................119
  7. 7. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 1 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 1. About Econsultancy Econsultancy is a global publisher, which educates the world’s marketers on everything from web analytics and email marketing, to social media, PR and ecommerce. It is used by more than 400,000 internet professionals every month. We provide independent research, consultancy services, and worldwide events and training for over 200,000 members and counting, with a retention rate of more than 90%. For the last 10 years, our resources have helped subscribers learn, make better decisions, build business cases, find the best suppliers, accelerate their careers and lead the way in best practice and innovation. Econsultancy has offices in London, New York, Sydney and Singapore and we are a leading provider of digital marketing training and consultancy. We are providing consultancy and custom training extensively across Europe, Asia and the US. We trained over 5,000 marketers and ran over 200 public training courses in 2012. Join Econsultancy today to learn what’s happening in digital marketing – and what works. Call us to find out more on +44 (0)20 7269 1450 (London) or +1 212 971 0630 (New York). You can also contact us online. 1.1. About the authors 1.1.1. David Moth (lead author) David Moth is a Senior Reporter at Econsultancy, and writes for the blog, which has more than 400,000 monthly unique visitors. He covers various digital marketing and ecommerce topics, concentrating on mobile, user experience and social media. You can connect with David on Twitter (@DavidMoth) or LinkedIn. (http://uk.linkedin.com/pub/david-moth/44/148/706) 1.1.2. Graham Charlton Graham Charlton is Editor of the Econsultancy blog, which has more than 400,000 monthly unique users. He writes about all aspects of digital marketing, including mobile, ecommerce and SEO and has also written and contributed to Best Practice Guides on mobile marketing, the EU ‘cookie law’, ecommerce and multichannel retail. You can connect with Graham on Twitter (@gcharlton) or LinkedIn (http://www.linkedin.com/graham-charlton).
  8. 8. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 2 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 Other related Econsultancy reports Reducing Customer Struggle 2013 http://econsultancy.com/reports/reducing-customer-struggle The Multichannel Retail Survey 2013 http://econsultancy.com/reports/the-multichannel-retail-survey Mobile Websites and Apps Optimization Best Practice Guide http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-websites-and-apps-optimization-best-practice-guide E-commerce Best Practice Compendium http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-best-practice-compendium How the Internet Can Save the High Street http://econsultancy.com/reports/how-the-internet-can-save-the-high-street Mobile Experience Trends Briefing: Digital Cream London 2013 http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-experience-trends-briefing-digital-cream-london-2013 Mobile Sophistication and Strategy Report http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-sophistication-and-strategy Mobile User Experience Trends Briefing http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-user-experience-trends-briefing SEO Best Practice Guide: Mobile SEO http://econsultancy.com/reports/seo-best-practice-guide-mobile-seo Paid Search Marketing (PPC) – Best Practice Guide: Mobile Paid Search Marketing http://econsultancy.com/reports/paid-search-marketing-ppc-best-practice-guide-mobile-paid-search- marketing Mobile Statistics http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics
  9. 9. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 3 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 2. Introduction This report is a useful guide for improving the mobile commerce user experience and giving ideas for how mobile can be used as part of a broader multichannel strategy. It contains hundreds of tips and examples from mobile commerce sites on improving conversion rates, checkout optimisation, landing page design, and how to embrace the use of mobile in-store. This advice all comes with a caveat: though we can make recommendations, and there is much to be said for following existing best practice in this area, the optimal approach to mobile web design and customer experience will vary depending on the type of website and the customer base. Therefore, we would recommend that online retailers test different design approaches to find the combination that delivers the best results for them. This report is split into three areas: Mobile commerce More than 50% of the UK population now owns a smartphone and some sites receive more than 30% of traffic from mobile devices, so the importance of mobile commerce cannot be ignored. This section looks at the key factors for creating a user-friendly mobile experience and looks at why eBay and Amazon have proved to be so successful. Mobile search This section looks at the difference between mobile and desktop search, and asks whether brands are making the most of the opportunity. Mobile’s role in a multichannel strategy Many retailers see consumer use of mobile in-store, or ‘showrooming’, as a threat to their business, but the truth is it’s only going to become more common. This section looks at ways in which retailers can turn showrooming to their advantage by using mobile to enhance the in-store experience.
  10. 10. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 4 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 3. Mobile statistics 3.1. Mobile usage and ownership  According to Ofcom 58% of the UK population owns a smartphone.  UK consumers download more data on their mobiles and tablets than users from other countries. In December 2011, the average UK mobile connection used 424 megabytes of data, followed by Japan (392 megabytes), while the US came in sixth (319 megabytes).  … 3.2. Mobile commerce  66% of UK smartphone users are more concerned about their privacy on smartphones than they were in 2012. [Source: TRUSTe, January 2013]  … 3.3. Mobile search  71% of smartphone owners research products on their mobile, with 32% doing it on a weekly basis. [Source: Tradedoubler, October 2012]  …
  11. 11. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 5 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 4. Mobile usage survey 4.1. How consumers use their smartphones To find out how people use mobile on a day-to-day basis we conducted an online survey using TolunaQuick, and asked smartphone owners what tasks they had carried out using their device in the past week. Making a phone call proved to be the most common task (83%) but interestingly three- quarters (74%) of respondents used email in the previous week and 67% used search. This highlights the increasing importance of mobile email, yet data included in our Email Marketing Census 20131 shows that a large number of companies do not have any strategy in place for optimising email for mobile devices, with 32% reporting this as ‘non-existent’, and 39% saying their strategy was ‘basic’. … Figure 1: What tasks have you carried out using your smartphone in the past week? Respondents:728 1 Email Marketing Industry Census 2013 http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/email-census
  12. 12. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 6 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 4.2. Consumer use of mobile commerce While there’s no doubt that consumers are increasingly using mobile devices while researching and browsing ecommerce sites, conversion rates still remain way behind tablet and desktop. Our survey underlines this problem as just over half of smartphone owners (51%) said that they hadn’t made a purchase using their device in the previous six months. ….. Among those who had made a purchase using their mobile, 54% had spent less than £50 in total in the previous six months. This indicates that in general, consumers still shy away from making bigger purchases using the mobile web or apps, although on the flip side 30% of mobile shoppers had spent more than £100. …
  13. 13. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 7 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 4.3. Barriers to mobile commerce As previously mentioned, conversion rates on smartphones lag way behind other devices. This is borne out by the fact that almost two-thirds (64%) of respondents who don’t use mobile … 4.4. What type of products do mobile shoppers purchase? The survey shows that inexpensive consumer goods are the most frequently purchased items through mobile commerce, which tallies with the fact that a majority of respondents had spent less than £50 though their mobiles. Books proved to be the most common mobile purchase (43%), closely followed by clothes (42%) and music (40%). This could possibly be a reflection of Amazon’s strength in mobile commerce, as shoppers can easily turn to its app to buy books and music with just a few clicks. Furniture proved to be the least popular among the available options with just 7% of mobile shoppers having browsed this product category, most likely due to the higher value of the majority of furniture items. Figure 2: What type of products did you shop for using your smartphone? Respondents: 359
  14. 14. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 8 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 5. Mobile commerce 5.1. The importance of speed for mobile commerce Speed (or lack of it) kills conversions on desktop sites and it's no different for mobile. In fact, with differing performance levels by device and variable mobile internet connections, it's even more important to minimise page weight. 5.1.1. Mobile performance and customer expectations A few years ago just having mobile internet was a novelty, but now customer expectations on performance have changed. Stats from Gomez2 show that the majority of users expect performance levels close to that on desktop: The stats also show that: … 2 http://www.gomez.com/wp-content/downloads/19986_WhatMobileUsersWant_Wp.pdf
  15. 15. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 9 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 5.1.2. Minimising page weight Don’t be swayed to include fancy graphics or pages that take a long time to download. Speed is absolutely vital on mobile, as it impacts hugely on conversion rate, page views and other metrics. If the customer has a less than optimal data rate, every byte on your site you can remove will improve their experience, conversion rate and raw satisfaction. … 5.1.3. Use a Content Distribution Network (CDN) If you’re operating internationally, it’s advisable to use a Content Distribution Network (CDN) like Akamai, Level 3 etc. These content networks can speed up site load time by caching your site or data at a city level for your mobile users to get fast response. Every millisecond counts. Big retail brands and popular sites could be doing more work to get the size of their mobile websites optimised and trimmed. It’s not uncommon to see pages where you’re downloading 30 or 40 items and pages of 100 or more kilobytes, which can turn into one or two minutes of download time. … 5.1.4. Avoid redirection Another common problem is where a visitor is bounced around when they visit a site. You start by loading www.domain.com, which then takes ages to redirect to domain.com, which then redirects to the mobile website, m.domain.com. This is really slow for the customer and it sucks money, as well as reducing the customer experience. It's called redirection and it happens when the technical people haven’t come up with a proper solution. …
  16. 16. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 10 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 5.2. How mobile-optimised sites drive conversion rates and AOVs (Average Order Values) Data from Affiliate Window3 shows that in the past two years the network’s traffic through mobile devices has increased from 2% to 19% of total network clicks. If we exclude tablet devices from this equation, traffic through mobile handsets has grown from 1.8% to 11%. With consumers increasingly using mobile devices to access the internet, it becomes of paramount importance to ensure that the mobile user journey is optimised for this experience. … 5.2.1. Gifts Advertisers A and B both operate within the gift space. They have similar product offerings and both receive in excess of 10% of their traffic through the affiliate channel from mobile handsets. 5.2.2. Footwear … 3 http://wiki.affiliatewindow.com/index.php/How_mobile- optimised_sites_drive_conversion_rates_and_AOVs
  17. 17. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 11 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 5.3. What can we learn from Amazon’s success in mobile commerce? Amazon was one of the first brands to see the early potential of mobile commerce and is now leading the way in terms of innovation and mobile sales. Its mobile site and apps have been a huge success and helped it to both maintain its dominance of ecommerce and extend its market reach. Part of Amazon’s success on mobile is obviously attributable to its reputation as a trustworthy online retailer, but that doesn’t tell the full story. Other well-known brands haven’t adapted to mobile commerce with the same urgency or focus on user experience and are now playing catch up. So here we look at 12 reasons that have contributed to Amazon’s success in mobile commerce. 1. It has a mobile site This is an obvious point, but it’s surprising how few retailers have mobile optimised sites. In fact it’s estimated that 80% of brands don’t have mobile sites. 2. Easy repeat purchases
  18. 18. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 12 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 5.4. Why eBay’s mobile apps are so popular eBay has enjoyed similar success to Amazon on mobile and this year expects to take more than $20bn through its various mobile platforms. Here are the features that have made its mobile apps so popular. 1. Excellent search function For mobile apps to be successful they need to be simple and convenient to use, and an accurate search function is a big part of delivering that experience. eBay’s shopping app not only uses predictive text, but also gives suggestions for product categories. …
  19. 19. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 13 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 6. Mobile search 6.1. How do mobile and desktop SEO differ, and how can you improve rankings? The proportion of search traffic from mobile devices grew ever larger during 2012, peaking at 46% on Christmas Day for some retailers, and Google isn’t alone in predicting that mobile search queries will soon surpass those made on desktop. But despite the increases in traffic and paid search spend, we’ve seen evidence that show brands aren’t fully aware of how to optimise pages for mobile search. Here three SEO experts give a broad overview of how mobile search differs from desktop and some of the issues that sites need to be aware of. How does mobile SEO differ from desktop SEO? “SAMPLE ONLY” …
  20. 20. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 14 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 6.2. Bricks-and-mortar stores are failing to take advantage of mobile search We’ve just seen that although businesses are aware of the opportunity in paid search, they’re failing to properly optimise their campaigns. To find out whether the situation was the same among local brick-and-mortar businesses, here are the results of a user test on restaurant, hairdressers and hotels in the Farringdon area of London. Farringdon Restaurants Based on my own anecdotal evidence it’s safe to assume that mobile search could be an important source of business for restaurants. However a Google search for ‘Farringdon restaurant’ revealed that only one of the three paid search results had a mobile optimised site. The top result was restaurant aggregator Zomato.com and the site required a great deal of pinching and scrolling to read any of the content.
  21. 21. Mobile Commerce Compendium Page 15 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2013 6.3. B&Q’s Club app is the perfect mobile loyalty scheme B&Q this year launched its Club loyalty app as it seeks to take advantage of that fact that up to two-thirds of its customers use their phones in-store. The home and garden retailer already has more than 640,000 customers signed up to its loyalty scheme, so the idea is to give them an easier way to redeem offers and also attract new users. Rather than rewarding purchases with loyalty points, the B&Q Club app gives customers a reason to go in-store by offering exclusive discounts on various products. The app, which was designed by Grapple, is available on iOS and Android. Usability The app certainly looks very slick, with a simple colour scheme and massive calls-to- action to make it easy to navigate. Upon opening the app you’re required to login or sign up for membership, with the lure of a monthly prize draw for £10,000 and cheap batteries used to sweeten the deal. … 6.4. Examples of location-based mobile campaigns One of the most obvious uses of location services is providing targeted offers and promotions to smartphone owners in-store. But we’ve also seen brands with little or no retail presence using mobile to add an additional layer of interaction to traditional outdoor advertising. There were a number of great examples of brands using location-based mobile services, but here is a run-down of eight of the best campaigns from 2012. 1. Douche Parking The Village, a Moscow-based online newspaper, created a free app called Parking Douche that aims to make bad parking socially unacceptable using digital media. It allows users to take pictures of badly parked cars and recognises the make, number plate and colour of the vehicle. This data is then streamed to banner ads that are targeted using an IP address so people who live or work near the vehicle see it on their computer screens. The idea is that the pop-up is intrusive and annoying, much like the nuisance parkers, and in order to remove it from their screen users have to share it on Facebook. It’s a really clever way of drawing attention to a problem that apparently affects all Russian cities, and gained decent exposure for The Village. 2. …

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