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Getting Things Done
the art of stress-free productivity
Book Summary
Chapters 1 - 6
Book Author : David Allen
Edition : 20...
A New Practice for a New Reality
GTD
Getting Control of Your Life
Getting Projects Creatively Under Way : Five Phases of P...
Chapter 1
A New Practice for a New Reality
Chapter Agenda
1.1 The Problem: New Demands, Insufficient Resources
1.2 The Pro...
Ch. 11.1. The Problem : New Demands, Insufficient Resources
GTD
New millennium paradox: Better quality of life, but added ...
Ch. 11.2. The Promise: The “Ready State” of the Martial Artist
GTD
The “Ready” State - The “mind like water” state
“It is ...
Implementation of basic behaviors and activities:
• Capture anything that’s unfinished, anything
occupying mind-space, int...
When one has something on their mind, its
because they want it to be different yet:
• Hasn’t clarified what exactly the in...
1.4 The Process: Managing Actions
GTD
Ch. 1
Managing
stuff
Managing Actions:
Clarity on what to do
and defining next steps...
Chapter 2
Getting Control of Your Life
Chapter Agenda
2. Five stage of Managing Workflow
2.1. Capture
2.2 Clarify
2.3 Orga...
Ch. 2Overview
• The chapter focuses on management of the horizontal aspects of our lives
• All five stages are integrated ...
Ch. 22.1. Capture
GTD
Gathering 100% of the “ Incompletes”
• All the things you consider incomplete: “need
to”, “ought to”...
Ch. 22.2 Clarify
• Action and information to be reminded off is identified and entrusted to a concrete system
GTD
“Stuff” ...
Ch. 22.3 Organize
GTD
8. Reference7. Incubation6. Trash1. Projects
2. Project
Plans
3. Waiting 4. Calendar
5. Next
Action ...
Ch. 22.4 Reflect
GTD
What to review when
 Calendar
 Next Action List
 Waiting list
Critical success factor
 Gather and...
Ch. 22.5 Engage
GTD
The Four-Criteria Model
for choosing actions in the
moment
 Context
 Time Available
 Energy Availab...
Chapter 3
Getting Projects Creatively Under Way:
Five Phases of Project Planning
Chapter Agenda
3.1 Vertical Focus and Typ...
Ch. 33.1. Vertical Focus and Types of Planning
GTD
Need of Vertical Focus
• Greater rigor and focus to get a project under...
• Purpose asks the “why?” question i.e. provides the
juice and the direction
• Principles are the standards and values tha...
GTD
3.2. Five Phases of Natural Planning
• Can be done internally or externally (mind-mapping,
white boards, etc.)
• Exter...
3.2. Five Phases of Natural Planning
GTD
Ch. 3
• Involves decisions about the allocation and
reallocation of physical reso...
Chapter 4
Getting Started: Setting up Time, Space and Tools
Chapter Agenda
4.1 Setting Aside Time
4.2 Setting up the Space...
Ch. 44.1. Setting Aside Time
• Create a block of time to initialize and prepare a workstation – Makes it attractive tosit ...
You will need a physical location to serve as a ‘central cockpit of control’
Minimum Requirements
• Writing Surface
• Room...
• You don’t need a planner unless you’re already using one regularly
GTD
4.3. Getting the tools you’ll need
• Find a simpl...
4.4. Filing System
GTD
Ch. 4
Discreet Filing Systems
• Used for contracts, financial data, etc.
• These are all one type o...
Chapter 5
Capturing: Corralling your “Stuff”
Chapter Agenda
5.1 Premise : Ready, Set…
Go!
5.2 Physical Gathering
• Approac...
Ch. 55.1. Premise : Ready, Set… Go!
• The chapter is an extension to chapter 1 where the author elaborates on dealing with...
• Search your physical environment for non permanent things and move them to the “In – Tray”
Unchanging Categories
• Suppl...
• On completion of physical gathering, move on to work on your mental RAM space
GTD
Ch. 55.3. Mental Gathering
• The autho...
Chapter 6
Clarifying: Getting “In” to empty
Chapter Agenda
6.1 Processing Guidelines
6.2 The next action
• Identifying
• D...
Ch. 66.1. Processing guidelines
GTD
Workflow Diagram
Processing
• Process top item first (LIFO/FIFO)
• Process one item at...
Ch. 66.2. The Next Action
GTD
• Avoid information clutter by trashing tasks based on necessity Trash
• Identify tasks that...
Ch. 66.3. Project Identification
GTD
• Make project definitions as broad as possible when listing them
• The listing is no...
Thank You
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Getting Things Done - David Allen - Book Summary -Chapters 1-6

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A summary of the first six chapters of the book.

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Getting Things Done - David Allen - Book Summary -Chapters 1-6

  1. 1. Getting Things Done the art of stress-free productivity Book Summary Chapters 1 - 6 Book Author : David Allen Edition : 2015 Dwimalu : : Rohit : : Apeksha : : Shreysi : : Swati Compiled By
  2. 2. A New Practice for a New Reality GTD Getting Control of Your Life Getting Projects Creatively Under Way : Five Phases of Project Planning Getting Started: Setting up Time, Space and Tools Capturing: Corralling your “Stuff” Clarifying: Getting “In” to empty Ch. 1 Ch. 2 Ch. 3 Ch. 4 Ch. 5 Ch. 6 Index
  3. 3. Chapter 1 A New Practice for a New Reality Chapter Agenda 1.1 The Problem: New Demands, Insufficient Resources 1.2 The Promise: The “Ready State” of the Martial Artist 1.3 The Principle: Dealing Effectively with Internal Commitments • The Basic Requirement for Managing Commitments • The Real Work of Knowledge work • Why Things are on your mind • The Transformation of “Stuff” 1.4 The Process: Managing Actions GTD
  4. 4. Ch. 11.1. The Problem : New Demands, Insufficient Resources GTD New millennium paradox: Better quality of life, but added stress because people take on more than available resources No clear boundaries in work Jobs keep Changing Old models and habits are insufficient Trying to focus on big picture High Stress • Nature of job changed rapidly • Training hasn’t evolved enough • No ‘limits’ to work- every project can be done “better” • Lack of edges creates more work, stress • Organizations are constantly evolving • Average professional is changing careers rapidly • No one likes to do a particular thing for an extended period • Traditional time- management tools are insufficient • Calendars, PDAs, to-do lists traditional tools • Average professional’s workload now too complex & dynamic • Business books, seminars suggest focusing on bigger picture • In reality, too much distraction to do it • Loftier levels highlights need for more change creating more stress
  5. 5. Ch. 11.2. The Promise: The “Ready State” of the Martial Artist GTD The “Ready” State - The “mind like water” state “It is a condition of working, doing and being in which the mind is clear and constructive things are happening” Need for “mind like water” state • Mind like water is a simile reflecting the controlled reaction of water when a pebble is thrown • Anything that causes one to over- react or under-react controls us • One needs to have a ‘mind like water’ to give appropriate attention to things How prepared are you? • Being in the state is when one feels in control and is focused on the task at hand • Being far out of it is characterized by feeling of stress, boredom, out of control • The techniques covered in the further chapters would explain how to get into the state
  6. 6. Implementation of basic behaviors and activities: • Capture anything that’s unfinished, anything occupying mind-space, into a system outside one’s mind that one knows one will come back to • Clarify what exactly one’s commitment is and decide the course of action to fulfilling it • Once the path is decided, keep reminders of the same in a system that one reviews regularly GTD 1.3 The Principle : Dealing Effectively with Internal Commitments Basic Requirements for Managing Commitments The Real work of Knowledge work • The need to think about stuff more than one realizes but less than one is afraid of • Natural tendency to resist thinking about what needs to be done about issues in their life • Outcome thinking, or defining outcomes, is one of the most effective things for getting things done Ch. 1
  7. 7. When one has something on their mind, its because they want it to be different yet: • Hasn’t clarified what exactly the intended outcome is • Hasn’t decided the next steps • Hasn’t put reminders of the outcome and actions required in a trusted system Because, one can fool everyone else, but can’t fool oneself GTD 1.3 The Principle : Dealing Effectively with Internal Commitments Why Things are on your mind The Transformation of “Stuff” “Stuff” is defined as, “anything that you have allowed into your psychological or physical world that doesn’t belong where it is, but for which you haven’t determined the desired outcome and the next action step” • Organizing systems work when the “Stuff” is decoded into real work which can be controlled • Its our personal commitment to clarify and understand the meaning of stuff Ch. 1
  8. 8. 1.4 The Process: Managing Actions GTD Ch. 1 Managing stuff Managing Actions: Clarity on what to do and defining next steps Bottom-up approach: Clearing the mundane things clears way for the more important ideas Horizontal (coherence across all activities of current involvement) and Vertical (thinking up & down the track of individual topics) control Getting it all out of your head: Capture thought and actions in objective tools to reduce the stress in your head
  9. 9. Chapter 2 Getting Control of Your Life Chapter Agenda 2. Five stage of Managing Workflow 2.1. Capture 2.2 Clarify 2.3 Organize 2.4 Reflect 2.5 Engage GTD
  10. 10. Ch. 2Overview • The chapter focuses on management of the horizontal aspects of our lives • All five stages are integrated yet should not be done together • The biggest reason of failure is trying to do “the most important things. GTD
  11. 11. Ch. 22.1. Capture GTD Gathering 100% of the “ Incompletes” • All the things you consider incomplete: “need to”, “ought to”, “should” • Capture it into containers until decision Capturing tools • The Physical In-tray • Writing Paper and Pads • Digital and Voice Note taking • E-mail and texting Get It All Out of Your Head • Trying to keep track of too many things : demotivator • Collection tools to be part of lifestyle Minimize the number of capture locations • Enough to capture information anywhere • As few so that information can be easily processed Empty the Capture tools regularly • To decide “what it is” and “what is to be done with it” The Success Factors for capturing • The sense of trust that nothing possibly useful will get lost gives one the freedom to think
  12. 12. Ch. 22.2 Clarify • Action and information to be reminded off is identified and entrusted to a concrete system GTD “Stuff” In-basket Do it What is it? What is the next action? Delegate it Is it actionable? Defer it Willittakelessthan2min Yes No Reference (retrievable when required) Someday/Maybe (Tickler file; hold for review) Trash Projects (planning) Project Plans (review for actions) YesNo Waiting (For someone else to do) Calendar (To do at a specific time) Next Action (To do as soon as I can)Clarify Organize
  13. 13. Ch. 22.3 Organize GTD 8. Reference7. Incubation6. Trash1. Projects 2. Project Plans 3. Waiting 4. Calendar 5. Next Action List The Next-Action categories Non-actionable items  Time-specific actions  Day-specifications  Day-specific information  Someday/Maybe  Tickler system • Categories of reminders and materials that will result from processing all information
  14. 14. Ch. 22.4 Reflect GTD What to review when  Calendar  Next Action List  Waiting list Critical success factor  Gather and process all your stuff  Review your system  Update your lists  Get calm, clear, current and complete • Having an overview of all the outstanding projects and loops
  15. 15. Ch. 22.5 Engage GTD The Four-Criteria Model for choosing actions in the moment  Context  Time Available  Energy Available  Priority The Threefold Model for Identifying Daily Work  Doing predefined work  Doing work as it shows up  Defining your work The Six-Level Model for Reviewing Your Work  Ground : Current Actions  Horizon 1: Current Projects  Horizon 2 : Areas of focus and accountabilities  Horizon 3: Goals  Horizon 4 : Vision  Horizon 5 : Purpose and principles Three Models for Making Action Choices • Objective to facilitate decision making on what is to be done at any point in time
  16. 16. Chapter 3 Getting Projects Creatively Under Way: Five Phases of Project Planning Chapter Agenda 3.1 Vertical Focus and Types of Planning • Natural Planning Model • Unnatural Planning Model • Reactive Planning Model 3.2 Five Phases of Natural Planning • Purpose and Principles • Vision and Outcome • Brainstorming • Organizing • Next Actions GTD
  17. 17. Ch. 33.1. Vertical Focus and Types of Planning GTD Need of Vertical Focus • Greater rigor and focus to get a project under control • Ensure the right steps have been determined • Validate and support our thinking Natural Planning Model • This is how we plan things usually in a day • May not necessarily be the normal planning mode; • In formal scenarios, we plan differently Reactive Planning Model • Used in times of crisis • Reverse of natural model • Always comes back to a top-down focus – Question is when natural planning will be done Unnatural Planning Model • Approaching any situation from a perspective that is not the natural way mind operates • Deciding goals and objectives before a solution • Ex: Making project outlines
  18. 18. • Purpose asks the “why?” question i.e. provides the juice and the direction • Principles are the standards and values that define criteria for excellence in behavior and parameters for action • Principles give clarity and reference point for positive conduct GTD 3.2. Five Phases of Natural Planning Benefits of Asking ‘Why?’ • Defines success • Creates decision-making criteria • Aligns resources • Motivates • Clarifies focus • Expands options 1. Purpose and Principles 2. Vision and Outcome • Asks the “what?” question • Having clarity and focus helps brain’s reticular activating system (RAS) to start making you aware of how it can happen • The RAS is responsible for self-fulfilling prophecies, and the effect where once you become aware of something you start seeing it everywhere. Steps for developing a vision • View the project from beyond the completion date • Envision "WILD SUCCESS"! • Capture features, aspects, qualities you imagine in place Ch. 3
  19. 19. GTD 3.2. Five Phases of Natural Planning • Can be done internally or externally (mind-mapping, white boards, etc.) • External brainstorming helps see everything without having to remember it all • Distributed Cognition: External helps generate many new ideas Keys to Good Brainstorming • Don’t judge, challenge, evaluate, or criticize • Go for quantity, not quality • Put analysis and organization in the background 3. Brainstorming 4. Organizing • Helps figure out the are the things that must occur to create the final result and their order • Make good use of structuring tools from informal bullet points to project planning software • Create Project Plan – Identify the smaller outcomes, which can then be naturally planned The Basics of Organizing • Identify the significant pieces. • Sort by (one or more): • components • Sequences • priorities • Detail to the required degree Ch. 3
  20. 20. 3.2. Five Phases of Natural Planning GTD Ch. 3 • Involves decisions about the allocation and reallocation of physical resources • Activating the Moving Parts: All actions that can be taken now should be identified • Dependent actions can wait until the steps they depend on have been completed The Basics of Next Actions • Decide on next actions for each of the current moving parts of the project. • Decide on the next action in the planning process, if necessary 5. Next Actions 80% projects can go through this in the head 15% require external brainstorming and 5% need deliberate application of steps To need more clarity, shift up towards purpose To need more actions to happen, shift down towards Next Actions How much planning to do?
  21. 21. Chapter 4 Getting Started: Setting up Time, Space and Tools Chapter Agenda 4.1 Setting Aside Time 4.2 Setting up the Space 4.3 Getting the tools you’ll need 4.4 Filing System GTD
  22. 22. Ch. 44.1. Setting Aside Time • Create a block of time to initialize and prepare a workstation – Makes it attractive tosit down through work • Getting set up can take a couple of days but can be done in smaller chunks • Best is to have a large chunk of uninterrupted time, such as a weekend or holiday • After hours at the office isn’t as good because you’re tired and have less time GTD Before you start, clear all commitments for that time so you’re not thinking about what you have to remember to do afterwards !
  23. 23. You will need a physical location to serve as a ‘central cockpit of control’ Minimum Requirements • Writing Surface • Room for an in-basket GTD More Functional Requirements • Phone, Computer • Stacking Trays, Working file drawers • Paper, favorite writing instrument • Any essential equipment for working 4.2. Setting Up the Space Ch. 4 If you work outside the home, make satellite control centers at home and work If you travel a lot, make a portable version with the basic files and supplies Don’t share control space with anyone else!
  24. 24. • You don’t need a planner unless you’re already using one regularly GTD 4.3. Getting the tools you’ll need • Find a simple, fast, and fun way of creating lists on the run and reviewing lists easily and regularly Basic Processing Tools Paper-holding trays (at least three) A stack of plain letter-size paper Pen/ Pencil Post-its (3x3s) Paper clips Binder Clips Stapler and Staples Scotch Tape Rubber Bands Automatic Labeler (Inexpensive Brother brand with AC adapter and black-on-white tape) File Folders Calendar Wastebasket/ recycling bins • The author provides an extensive list of tools that will be needed Ch. 4
  25. 25. 4.4. Filing System GTD Ch. 4 Discreet Filing Systems • Used for contracts, financial data, etc. • These are all one type of thing where the category would fill more than half a file drawer General Filing Systems • Used for or notes, brochures, faxes, printouts, etc. • The filing needs to be fun to do, easy, and complete 2 Types of Filing Systems Success Tips • Keep general reference within “swivel distance” of your control area • Use one alphabetic system (up to one subdivision: Gardening— pots, Gardening—ideas, etc.) • Have lots of fresh folders on hand • Keep drawers under 3⁄4 full for easy access • Label with automatic labeler • Get rid of hanging files (or do one labeled file per hanger) • Have cabinets with high-quality mechanics • Purge files at least once per year
  26. 26. Chapter 5 Capturing: Corralling your “Stuff” Chapter Agenda 5.1 Premise : Ready, Set… Go! 5.2 Physical Gathering • Approach • Issues • Order 5.3 Mental Gathering • Triggers GTD
  27. 27. Ch. 55.1. Premise : Ready, Set… Go! • The chapter is an extension to chapter 1 where the author elaborates on dealing with incompletes • The process of capturing makes us aware of what we are “not” doing and get a holistic picture of the “doing” • Stuff that lies around as is, was and could be “potentially” important is eating up more energy than it deserves • The importance of corralling is explained through the two forms of physical and mental gathering GTD
  28. 28. • Search your physical environment for non permanent things and move them to the “In – Tray” Unchanging Categories • Supplies : Regular needs like stationary, business cards, forms etc. • Reference Material : Information, schedules, phone number books etc. • Decoration : Artwork, pictures etc. • Equipment : Phone, computer, printer etc. Issues in Capturing • More than what will fit in the tray • Purging and organizing – derailment • Previously organized stuff • Running into critical things GTD Management  Make lists, notes, reminders etc. putting dates on everything is a worthy habit  Clarify and clear your lists quickly, create smaller projects to purge and clean  Ideally previously organized stuff should be moved to “still processing” list  Prioritize and ensure that your organizing is going to put it first in the to-do list (In)Action • Usually need not be tossed in the tray • There should be no action tied to them • The essence of capturing is complete when one can identify the outer edges to the “In” inventory Ch. 55.2. Physical Gathering
  29. 29. • On completion of physical gathering, move on to work on your mental RAM space GTD Ch. 55.3. Mental Gathering • The author recommends listing out all the actions, thoughts and ideas on paper • This is handy and helps in prioritizing focus on one item at a time and avoids clutter • It is better to overdo the process than to risk missing out things, make enough stacks Professional Projects Communications Meetings Financials Planning/Organizing Management Administration Professional Development Professional Leisure Family/ Relationships Upcoming events Legal Health Personal Development Community Errands • The author then provides an extensive list of incompletion triggers for tray items
  30. 30. Chapter 6 Clarifying: Getting “In” to empty Chapter Agenda 6.1 Processing Guidelines 6.2 The next action • Identifying • Do, Delegate, Defer 6.3 Project identification GTD
  31. 31. Ch. 66.1. Processing guidelines GTD Workflow Diagram Processing • Process top item first (LIFO/FIFO) • Process one item at a time • Never put anything back into “IN” The focus of this chapter is on the “Next Action” • Focus on one task and in order • Avoid emergency scanning • Disorder may lead to unprocessed tasks • Multitasking is an exception in a few tasks Post this the results would be • Trashing unnecessary tasks • Finishing short tasks (< 2 minutes) • Delegation of tasks • Reminders are made Image source: Internet
  32. 32. Ch. 66.2. The Next Action GTD • Avoid information clutter by trashing tasks based on necessity Trash • Identify tasks that have the potential to be realized later and tag them Incubate • Create references and labels to easily pick the tasks for the future Reference Decision Action or No Action Do It • If it takes less than 2 minutes • Does not need tracking • Spend task time considerately Delegate It • “Best person to do it” question • Find a delegate and handoff tasks • Keep dates and reminders • Track the delegation Defer it • Takes longer than 2 minutes • Move them to pending list • Add reminders to notify oneself If Actionable • Pending tasks are then moved up for further organizing and planning If Transferable If Foreseeable
  33. 33. Ch. 66.3. Project Identification GTD • Make project definitions as broad as possible when listing them • The listing is not merely for prioritizing but to add tabs and placeholders on tasks • This also adds a reviewing aspect to where we are in the completion of tasks • Broad definition of projects enables one to avoid complacency of completion • After the project identification the stance of the “In” Tray is on actionable terms Listing Projects • Order • Importance • Broad Scope • Action-ability • Review
  34. 34. Thank You

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