Day 9 notes

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Day 9 notes

  1. 1. Political Campaigns and Elections <ul><li>Day 9 </li></ul><ul><li>TCI Ch10 </li></ul><ul><li>July 2, 2008 </li></ul>
  2. 2. Notes - Day 9 <ul><li>(TCI Ch 10) </li></ul><ul><li>Essential Question: Elections and voting: Why should they matter to you? </li></ul>
  3. 3. Political Campaigns and Elections <ul><li>plurality - largest number of votes in an election; possible to win without plurality (more than 2 candidates or Al Gore) </li></ul><ul><li>winner-take-all-system - electoral system that awards offices to the highest vote-getters without ensuring representation for the minority. Slim majority can control all elected offices. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Right to Vote <ul><li>1789 - only white males who owned property could vote </li></ul><ul><li>1820s - all white males could vote </li></ul><ul><li>1870 - all males could vote </li></ul><ul><li>1920 - women vote </li></ul><ul><li>1924 - American Indians could vote </li></ul><ul><li>1971 - 18 year olds could vote </li></ul>
  5. 5. Eligibility <ul><li>To vote you must be: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>US citizen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>at least 18 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>resident of the state </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>legally registered voter - should be easy to encourage voting </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. The Nomination Process <ul><li>primary election - voters determine their political party’s nominee for an elective office </li></ul><ul><li>general election - voters choose among candidates from different parties to fill elective office </li></ul>
  7. 7. Primaries <ul><li>closed primary - voting limited to registered party members </li></ul><ul><li>open primaries - voters decide which party to vote in on Election Day </li></ul><ul><li>blanket primary - voters can a candidate from any party’s list </li></ul>
  8. 9. General Elections <ul><li>presidential elections - every four years: pres, VP, 1/3 of Senate, all of House, state and local officials </li></ul><ul><li>midterm election - 1/3 of Senate, all of House, most governors, state and local officials </li></ul><ul><li>off-year election - local elections </li></ul>
  9. 10. More stuff <ul><li>term limits - only federal official with term limit is President; states can have term limits for state officials </li></ul><ul><li>stump speech - standard speech which candidate repeats throughout election </li></ul><ul><li>battleground states - vote will be close, get more attention from candidates </li></ul>
  10. 11. Electoral College <ul><li>states now allow voters to choose electors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>you vote for electors who pledge to vote for your candidate </li></ul></ul><ul><li>number of electoral votes = nnumber of reps in Congress (need 270 of 538 to win) </li></ul><ul><li>In no majority, House picks - each state one vote </li></ul>
  11. 12. Electoral College <ul><li>criticism - undemocratic; however, small states are kept important </li></ul><ul><li>congressional district method - </li></ul><ul><li>national popular vote - </li></ul>
  12. 13. Financing Elections <ul><li>money comes from: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>donors (up to $2300) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>candidate - loans to oneself </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Political Party </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PACs (up to $5000) </li></ul></ul>
  13. 14. end of notes <ul><li>include 10.5 later? </li></ul>

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