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Maximise Your Research Potential with Relevant Industry

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Maximise Your Research Potential with Relevant Industry

  1. 1. favoriot Maximise Your Research Potential With Relevant Industry • Dr. Mazlan Abbas - FAVORIOT • UTHM Talk • Nov. 19, 2020
  2. 2. favoriot The UTM (Academia) Journey
  3. 3. favoriot Lessons Learned 1. No industrial experience in Product Development 2. Didn’t realize the scale of the Project 3. Too ambitious – Prototype to Real Product 4. Importance of Teamwork – Research Cluster (Telematics)
  4. 4. favoriot The Celcom (Telco) Journey
  5. 5. favoriot Building Developers Community
  6. 6. favoriot Lessons Learned 1. Business opportunities – B2C or B2B 2. Technology too early – SMS, MMS, GPRS 3. Talent insufficient to develop in-house 4. Priority - Solving internal problems or creating new products
  7. 7. favoriot The MIMOS (R&D) Journey • 39 Research prototypes (covering projects such as IPv6, WSN, WiMAX, IMS, 6LoWPAN, IOT, HetNet, Cognitive Radio, Mobile Cloud etc), 130 IP Disclosures including 27 Patents, which are considered novel and inventive.
  8. 8. favoriot Focusing on Research
  9. 9. favoriot Users Access Point Relay HOT SPOT (50-200m) HOT ZONE (500m-1km) Relay DR-Mesh METRO NET (5-10km) Mesh Mesh Mesh Mesh Mesh Mesh PAN Gateway (0-50m) HOT ZONE 9 The Wireless Vision
  10. 10. favoriot Mesh Network
  11. 11. favoriot The Beginning of a Real Commercial Product
  12. 12. favoriot WiWi Product Variants Access Point Relay Wireless Hybrid Point-to-Point Bridge IOT Gateway Mesh WiWi Gen 1.8b-1 (AP) WiWi Gen 1.8b-2 (AP Ent) WiWi Gen 1.8b-3 (Relay) WiWi Gen 1.8b-11 (Relay Ent) WiWi Gen 1.8b-4 (WiMAX) WiWi Gen 1.8b-10 (HSDPA) WiWi Gen 1.8b-19 (LTE) WiWi Gen 1.8b-5 WiWi Gen 1.8b-6 WiWi Gen 1.8b-7 (IOT/ADSL) WiWi Gen 1.8b-16 (IOT/WiMAX) WiWi Gen 1.8b-17 (IOT/HSDPA) WiWi Gen 1.8b-18 (IOT/LTE) WiWi Gen 1.8b-12 (Gateway/ADSL) WiWi Gen 1.8b-13 (Gateway/WiMAX) WiWi Gen 1.8b-14(Gateway/HSDPA) WiWi Gen 1.8b-15 (Gateway/LTE) WiWi Gen 1.8b-9 (Mesh Point) GPS WiWi Gen 1.8b-8 ** Completed (PRA) On-Going Not CCN yet
  13. 13. favoriot Lessons Learned
  14. 14. favoriot Lessons Learned 1. Very costly and long period - Research to Product to Commercialization 2. Patents on the shelf 3. Two separate teams (Research & Development) under different Heads 4. Non-agile – Too process oriented 5. The Trap of Osborne Effect 6. Too big to chew 7. “Solution in search of a Problem”?
  15. 15. favoriot How-To Build Producer Nation University Industry Market R&D Product (Roadmap) Commercialise Maintain Loyalty Output Share Industry problems Sell Understanding Roles and Responsibilities • Publications • Knowledge • Time-to-market • Revenue • Solve their problems YouTube Video Prototype (Alpha) Prototype (Beta) Copyright: Dr. Mazlan Abbas (2020)
  16. 16. favoriot 10-Slides Pitch Deck 10. Call to Action 9. Team 8. Competitive Analysis 2. Problem Statement 3. Target Market 4. The Solution – Your Product 5. Business Model 6. Current Traction 7. Marketing Strategy 1. Vision Pitch Deck
  17. 17. favoriot Crossing the CHASM Public Sector Grants Entrepreneurial and Seed/Angel Investors Venture Capitalists Stock Owners Technology Creation Market Focused Business & Product Development Early Commercialization Private Sector CHASM Cash Flow “Valley of Death” Cash Flow Or Sales Typical Primary Investors Cash Flow Sales Time
  18. 18. favoriot Research Challenges
  19. 19. favoriot Research “Misunderstanding” • How Long Does It Take? • What’s the Difference Between Masters and PhD? • Why Problem Definition Takes A Long Time? • Why “Research” Approach is Different From “Development”? • What are the characteristics of a Good Researcher?
  20. 20. favoriot What is BASIC Research? • Basic research also known as fundamental or pure research is driven by a scientist’s curiosity or interest in a question. The main motivation of this type of research is:- • To expand man’s knowledge of the world and not to invent or create something new. • There is no obvious commercial value in research of this type.
  21. 21. favoriot What is BASIC Research? • Basic science research includes answers to such questions as: • How did the universe begin? • How has the brain evolved over time? • How does DNA determine who we are? • What is the specific genetic code of an earth worm? • What are protons, neutrons and electrons made of?
  22. 22. favoriot What is APPLIED Research? • Applied research is designed to the practical problems that exist in the modern world, rather than to just acquire knowledge for knowledge’s sake. • One main goal of applied science is to improve human conditions and make the world a better place.
  23. 23. favoriot What is APPLIED Research? Applied science may investigate ways to: • improve agricultural crop production • get better network throughput • find alternative routing solutions • treat or cure a specific disease • improve the energy efficiency of homes
  24. 24. favoriot What’s the Difference Between Degree, Masters and PhD’s Work? [Source: “The Illustrated Guide to a PhD” by Matt Might]
  25. 25. favoriot Imagine a circle that contains all of human knowledge:
  26. 26. favoriot By the time you finish elementary school, you know a little:
  27. 27. favoriot By the time you finish high school, you know a bit more:
  28. 28. favoriot With a bachelor's degree, you gain a specialty:
  29. 29. favoriot A master's degree deepens that specialty:
  30. 30. favoriot Reading research papers takes you to the edge of human knowledge:
  31. 31. favoriot Once you're at the boundary, you focus:
  32. 32. favoriot You push at the boundary for a few years:
  33. 33. favoriot Until one day, the boundary gives way:
  34. 34. favoriot And, that dent you've made is called a Ph.D.:
  35. 35. favoriot Of course, the world looks different to you now:
  36. 36. favoriot So, don't forget the bigger picture:
  37. 37. favoriot Activity Detail Tasks Timeframe Establish Context Literature Review Problem Definition Scope of Research 3-6 months (MSc-PhD) Select & Design Methods Mathematical Modeling Simulation Experimental 3-6 months Undertake Research New mathematical theory New programming language New simulation tool Acquisition and trials test-bed 3-6 months Analysis & Validation Testing of Model 6-12 months Create Output Thesis Technical report 3-6 months Review & Evaluate Publication Conference VIVA < 3 months Note: On average = Masters (2 years to complete) and PhD (3-6 years to complete)
  38. 38. favoriot How To Choose a Good Scientific Problem? [Excerpts from the Article “How To Choose a Good Scientific Problem” by Uri Alon]
  39. 39. favoriot Choosing good problem is essential for being a good researcher. But what is a good problem, and how do you choose one?
  40. 40. favoriot The Feasibility-Interest Diagram for Choosing a Project
  41. 41. favoriot The Feasibility-Interest Diagram for Choosing a Project
  42. 42. favoriot The mentors’ task is to support students through the cloud that seems to guard the entry into the unknown. And, with this schema, we have more space to see that problem C exists and may be more worthwhile than continuing to plod toward B. “Sailing into the unknown again and again takes courage” The Objective and Nurturing Schemas of Research
  43. 43. favoriot IP Landscape Using Thomson Innovation Tool
  44. 44. favoriot Research Approaches (1) Mathematical Modeling (2) Simulation (3) Experimental
  45. 45. favoriot Mathematical Modeling Fast, easily define upper and lower bound Complex mathematics, need programming
  46. 46. favoriot Network Model Traffic Model Packet Scheduling Model Algorithm Performance Results Simulation Scalable, Flexible Assumptions must be accurate Time consuming Either self-programming or using simulation tool Expensive (?)
  47. 47. favoriot Experimental Accurate, real results Time consuming, expensive, not scalable
  48. 48. favoriot Degree Masters PhD Support test-bed setup Simple experiment and Data Collection Some simple application programming Support experimental work (advanced) Simulation to proof the concept/ideas Mathematical modeling Develop Simulation model Co-generate and test new ideas The need for Degree, Masters and PhD In a research group
  49. 49. favoriot How Do We Manage Researchers?
  50. 50. favoriot Researchers Expectations • Breathing space • Need time to think to be creative. • Understanding Short and Long Term • Knowledge always starts anew in every project. • Impact of “Killing A Project” • We can kill a Product or Project but be careful in killing a “Research” since it will “wipe out” knowledge. • Quest for Knowledge • Never ending journey to the Frontiers of Knowledge • Finding new challenges • Recognition in their area of expertise
  51. 51. favoriot Light At the End of The Tunnel “Research” Working with the “Unknown” “Development” Working with “Known” PhD is not all about the novelty achieved but it’s the Systematic Process of Doing Research that’s the utmost important.
  52. 52. favoriot Researchers’ Challenges (But who appreciates people working with the Unknown?)
  53. 53. favoriot Viewing Angle Application Layer Physical Layer Data Link Layer Presentation Layer Network Layer Transport Layer Session Layer Valley of Appreciation – the challenge Management Researcher My view…
  54. 54. favoriot How Deep to Explore? “Breadth” or “Depth” of Research
  55. 55. favoriot To Go Deeper … You Need a Platform The Need for Research Group and Vision
  56. 56. favoriot Explorer’s Risk Cave Explorer
  57. 57. favoriot Do We Reward the “Cave Explorer”? Unstoppable Effort Taking High Risks Venture into the Unknown
  58. 58. favoriot One More Thing
  59. 59. favoriot Development (D) Stage Activities ~ % S E R 100 0 AR 80 20 AT 50 50 PD 10 90 M 0 100 Risk increases Research Research to Development Value Chain Applied Research Advanced Technology Product Development Maintenance
  60. 60. favoriot www.favoriot.com favoriot favoriot favoriot favoriot info@favoriot.com favoriot

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