Orgon Donation

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  • 1/ Show slide of gravestones of people who passed away last year whilst waiting for a donor, accompanied with the song ‘Tears in heaven’ by Eric Clapton for about a minute, while the group members come on stage. The presenter than says in an upbeat manner and loud, clear voice “Hey but were not just going to talk about people dying, we want to talk about LIFE and how YOU (all members point at audience) can help people that are on an organ-donation-waiting-list to continue their living their life” (Play lyrics of the song ‘Life, oh life, oh life, oh life by Desree’ for about a minute to give the presenter time to get comfortable on stage with notes, pointer and drinking water). Members of group will clap hands and skip/dance a little over stage to energise the room. The most confident speaker of the group will act as the single presenter, but other members will help with handouts, time keeping, music and lighting. Thus, generally making sure presentation is run smoothly.
  • 2/ The presenter invites the audience in on the presentation’s master plan by telling them what Organ Donation Awareness Australia is going to tell them (like in an introduction for an essay-tell them what you are going to tell them). The presenter will show a ‘road map’, which graphically shows the structure of the talk. Furthermore, the presenter informs the audience that it is a formal presentation and that questions will happily answered at the end of presentation.
  • 3/ the presenter has made sure to make the unknown familiar through lots (at least 6 times) of practice. Before the actual presentation he/she have spend at least twice the time we expect to speak on the topic rehearsing our oral communication and covered six factors: reciting the full text, in the venue, in front of an audience, in front of a camera, using the computer for PowerPoint presentation, and dressed and groomed as we would be in the presentation (green shirt with the slogan “Organ donation is a life changing event” to attract attention).
  • 4/ To reduce performance anxiety the speaker and other members avoid stimulants and tranquilisers, and try to relax through mediation, deep breathing, listening to music and some doing some gentle stretches. The group arrives at the venue with plenty of time to spare to avoid unnecessary stress if held up for any reason. In addition the group members mingle with the audience before presentation and make mental notes of people and their concerns, which might be mentioned in the presentation. If something important was brought up by an audience member the presenter may say something like: “Just before this presentation I was talking to a lady who mentioned......I would just like to clarify that now”, this shows that the groups care about the audience’s concerns and it also personalises the talk. Through the preparation the group members are well rehearsed on the presented material.
  • 5/ the presenter will use a lectern as a prop on stage to minimise muscular trembling and to offer some barrier between the presenter and the audience to give the speaker some sense of security, stepping out periodically to engage the audience. The speaker is aware of unconscious behaviour such as swaying, leaning/or standing awkwardly. The presenter can use a pointer to direct the audiences gaze away for a little while to certain projected images on the PowerPoint slide; however, the presenter aims to face the audience directly for most of the time and use direct eye contact (Minimal 80%). This will also help project the speaker’s voice towards the audience.
  • 6/ the presenter will strive to speak clearly by correct pronunciation (use correct sounds to say the word) and articulation (speak the words clearly) of words, no mumbling. The presenter will try to use clear but relaxed diction, appropriate inflection (change pitch and/or volume when appropiate). Choose words carefully, use structure and pace to control the communication, giving cues to the audience on the meanings the group wishes to convey. Cues such as; the speaker pausing, infliction, pitching and pacing. Moreover, the speaker will monitor the non-verbal reactions of the audience. If the audience are showing particular interest in some point of the presentation the speaker will develop that point some more. The presenter will use clear, non-technical (Jargon) language appropriate to the target audience. Finally the speaker will use graphics and other pictorial material to clarify messages and personal stories, narratives, examples, and anecdotes to make the data come alive.  
  • 7/ The presenter will strife not use the PowerPoint’s slides as the be all and end all, as most importantly it is recognised as a tool to get our message across to help summarise, clarify and illuminate, as well as add variety to keep the audience interested. The presenter makes sure audio-visual aid of PowerPoint slides are used as triggers for the message Organ Donation Awareness Australia want to get across. Although facts and figures are necessary the speaker will compliment that with personal stories to build empathy with the audience and get them to support organ donation. The presenter will add some spice to the presentation with variety and insights, such as quotations of organ donor receivers and their families; stories of organ donor families, a dramatic visual.
  • 8/ The speaker will try to act natural when a mistake is made or if something goes wrong. The presenter will admit it if the audience has noted the mistake and say something like; “Not sure where I was going with that thought, however, it doesn’t matter....let’s move right along to this important point that I need to discuss”. The speaker enhances his/her credibility and comes across as more personal. The presenter will repeat the message in different ways throughout the presentation to reinforce the message Australia has a shortage of organ donors.
  • 9/ The presenter will also use the information pack handout factsheet to distract peoples gaze away from the speaker and say something to the tune of: “If we can all get the factsheet out of the information bag then together we can summarise the main points of the presentation. This will also reinforce the message and aid recall for the audience. The information kit includes the factsheet with contact numbers/website and key points of the presentation. It also includes a green ribbon with our slogan “Organ donation is a life changing event”, a pen and stickers to reinforce our message to become an organ donor and application form to register as a donor. The speaker’s statement also indicates to the audience that the presentation is ending. The speaker will finish with a high impact punch line and a strong statement of what the audience gets out of it if it follows our advice of becoming an organ donor?? Choose Life!!
  • 10/ When a question is asked the presenter will thank the respondent, paraphrase and engaged with a response, ensure the question is answered satisfactory and stay true (if the speaker cannot answer a question and other member have also acknowledge discreetly that they are unaware of the answer the speaker will tell respondent that he/she will get in touch with them after the presentation when the answer has been sourced. The speaker will because of the sensitive subject matter of the presentation always be aware to express genuine empathy. If members of the audience are upset, acknowledge that death is a tragedy, but that through organ donation something optimistic can be gained from it.The speaker will at all cost avoid using distant, abstract, unfeeling language when discussing harm, deaths, injuries, and illnesses with the audience.  
  • Orgon Donation

    1. 1. Sponsored By Sponsored By Health Communication HST1124 Leesa Costello
    2. 2. Last year 100 people died waiting …
    3. 3. Organ Donation Meet Alex, he is waiting for a Kidney is a life changing transplant…. event Watch this space!!!
    4. 4.  One organ and tissue donor can save and improve the quality of life of up to ten others  Australia has one of the world’s best transplant success rates  However, it has also one of the world’s lowest organ and tissue donation rates  About 50% of all organs transplanted from deceased donors are kidneys  There is an urgent need to increase Australia's donation rate Australia and New Zealand Organ Donation Registry. (2006). ANZOD Registry Report 2006. Adelaide: ANZOD. Australian Red Cross Blood Service. (2009, January). Fact Sheets. Retrieved May 11, 2009, from LifeGift: http://www.organdonor.com.au/ Medicare Australia. (2009, April 23). AODR statistics. Retrieved May 11, 2009, from Medicare Australia: http://www.medicareaustralia.gov.au/provider/patients/aodr/stats.jsp National Clinical Taskforce on Organ and Tissue Donation. (2008). National Clinical Taskforce on Organ and Tissue Donation Final Report: Think Nationally, Act Locally. Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing. Transplant Australia. (2009). Religious Rulings. Retrieved May 11, 2009, from Life Team: http://www.transplant.org.au/Religious-Rulings.html
    5. 5. Donors Per Year in Australia Number of donors 250 206 218 204 196 196 185 202 198 199 200 179 164 150 100 50 0 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 YEAR
    6. 6.  Less than 1% of people die in such way that organ donation is medically possible in Australia  Australia is currently ranked 17th in the world for organ donation on the scale of developed nations  In Australia, an estimated 100 people die each year while waiting for an organ transplant due to shortage of organ and tissue donors  As of January 2009 there were 1757 people in Australia on the waiting list for a transplant  So right now, there is no certainly you or your family will receive a transplant if you need one Australia and New Zealand Organ Donation Registry. (2006). ANZOD Registry Report 2006. Adelaide: ANZOD. Australian Red Cross Blood Service. (2009, January). Fact Sheets. Retrieved May 11, 2009, from LifeGift: http://www.organdonor.com.au/ Medicare Australia. (2009, April 23). AODR statistics. Retrieved May 11, 2009, from Medicare Australia: http://www.medicareaustralia.gov.au/provider/patients/aodr/stats.jsp National Clinical Taskforce on Organ and Tissue Donation. (2008). National Clinical Taskforce on Organ and Tissue Donation Final Report: Think Nationally, Act Locally. Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing. Transplant Australia. (2009). Religious Rulings. Retrieved May 11, 2009, from Life Team: http://www.transplant.org.au/Religious-Rulings.html
    7. 7. International Donor Statistics 2007 Donors Per Million 34.3 30 25 24.6 20 16.0 15.0 15 14.3 13.2 12.0 9.2 9.0 9.0 10 5.8 5 Countries
    8. 8. Every 13 minutes... Every hour… Everyday… A person is added to 4 more are 17 lose the fight the list added Death on organ waiting (2009). Retrieved May 09, 2009 from www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content
    9. 9. The Australian donor registry needs your help! As one donor can help save the life of up to ten people. In Australia less than 200 people donate their organs and approximately 100 people are less fortunate as they die waiting for a donor transplant. Thinking of how you can help? Become a registered organ donor, for more information please visit www.organ-donation-awarness-australia.com.au or contact our experienced assistants on 1300 123 654. So don’t take your organs to heaven, help us help other Australians contact us NOW to become a registered organ donor today as ‘Organ Donation is a life changing event’.

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