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Mh newsletter september 2021

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Maypop Hill, native plants, butterflies, natural gardening, environment, ecology, Southern gardens,

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Mh newsletter september 2021

  1. 1. 1 / 5 An occasional report of what’s growing at Maypop Hill Nursery and the Miley homestead in Norwood, LA; to subscribe to the free newsletter, contact us by email: maypophill@gmail.com. website: maypophill.com The Maypop Hill Newsletter The Maypop Hill Newsletter September 2021 The idea for swept paths in front of the house was inspired by Neil Odenwald, the horticulture professor and co-author with James Turner of the big green book about Southern Plants. Before he passed away earlier this year, Mr. Odenwald had given more speeches and seminars than you can shake a roughleaf dogwood branch at. The advice that impressed many gardeners was his recommendation to create interesting walkways to entice people to explore and enjoy original designs of the homeowner. And so we have. But, oops, we often forget (or maybe ignore) his advice to take it easy on the yard art. Swept yards, by the way, were once common in the South. Fenced “cottage gardens” kept free range pigs from eating the vegetables. Lawns and volunteer plants called weeds were routinely swept away with brooms. When Maypop Hill went native and started tinkering with Permaculture, we made some dramatic changes to the way we use the land. The homestead still has lots of lawn grass, in the driveway and areas where people walk. Since mowing is not as much fun for us as for other people, we reduced areas that need frequent maintenance St. Augustine grass is not allowed to grow closer than 5 or more feet to the house. That means no foundation plantings. Sidewalks and rock or brick paths touch the exterior walls, not plants.
  2. 2. 2 / 5 Falling-down Floppy? Totally Too Tall? Goldenrod is one of those important tall flowers that fall migrating butterflies and bees depend on for pollen and nectar. You can reliably find these handsome pollinator plants in home landscapes and rural roadsides. Yes, readers, that is a joke. People associate hay fever and sinus allergies with Goldenrod (Solidago species), not the real offender, the homely and inconspicuous Ragweed. Pinching back tall plants definitely keeps them shorter. Trellises prop up the ones that got too big for their britches. Maypop Hill's upland prairie is small, an acre or so, of native grasses and forbs (wildflowers. It's easy for us to get away with letting wild things grow all over the place. What about gardeners who don't have the space or freedom to grow tall, sprawly plants? Uh. Well. Uh. Not an easy solution or one size fits all, maybe protected pollinator patches in a tiny place of the yard, creative corners of plantings that neighbors will appreciate? This cute little guy showed up in a hugelkultur pot of tall native mints. And so, yes, it can be done. Even an apartment dweller with a balcony can grow a container or two of pollinator plants to TITHE TO NATURE. This ironweed (Vernonia species) did not fall down after Hurricane Ida gave us a glancing blow. Many of the others, 6+ foot tall, did fall over. Ironweed may be the best butterfly magnet for us.
  3. 3. 3 / 5 Shrubs for Summer Shade and Snazzy Scarlet Style For many weeks this summer, a Strawberry Bush (Euonymus americanus) has made beaucoups of bright red seeds which the birds have not yet eaten. We never, however, see new plants, also called Hearts-a-bustin' and Wahoo, growing far from the house, because once deer find their favorite foliage food, it soon is chewed to desuetude. Turk's Cap Mallow (Malvaviscus arboreus) under a shortleaf pine tree would make more flowers if it received more sunlight than it gets now. The butterflies don't complain though. Hummingbirds also sip nectar from the upright red blossoms. We like it because it blooms from spring to late fall, tolerates drought is not bothered by deer, and survives its foliage being eaten by caterpillars, possibly the offspring of the Turk’s Cap White Skipper.
  4. 4. 4 / 5 Maypop Hill Nursery & Publications 4979 Spec Garig Rd., Norwood, LA Betty & LJ Miley, specializing in native plants of the South email: maypophill@gmail.com web: maypophill.com Geaux native! Why grow a Kieffer pear tree? The good pears make an easy cobbler Mix a cuppa self-rising flour, a cuppa milk, a cuppa sugar, a pincha cinnamon, vanilla extract. Carefully melt half a cuppa butter in a baking dish. Pour the batter into the buttery dish. Add 3 cups of chopped fruit on top, with a half cuppa chopped pecans and a bitta brown sugar. Bake 350, about an hour. The rotting fruit attracts butterflies, gnarly red wasps, chipmunks. Cardinal Flower grows in its shade and attracts hummingbirds. cuppa cuppa cuppa cobbler
  5. 5. 5 / 5 Curb Appeal to Attract Our Favorite Bugs of Summer LOCATION – open sunny areas, warm temps, still air FOOD – flowers! for a list of nectar plants, click on Putting Nature First pdf Putting Nature First pdf and look on page 44. All year round (it's even possible to spot overwintering moths and butterflies), gardeners may find Lepidoptera lovelies lapping up liquid-y tree sap, as well as icky, rotting, mushy pears, apples, bananas, oranges, and other fruit. COLORS – flowers or garden features that appeal to their ultraviolet range of vision: purple, white, pink, orange, yellow; they are not as likely to be attracted to green and blue Pears that were too gooey for the chipmunks

Maypop Hill, native plants, butterflies, natural gardening, environment, ecology, Southern gardens,

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