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#PINCamp13, What does news as a conversation really mean?

How do we keep our journalism focused on and collaborative with our audiences?
Presentation to Public Insight Network Camp, June 2013, at American Public Media

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#PINCamp13, What does news as a conversation really mean?

  1. 1. What news asa conversationreally meansJoy Mayer | @mayerjoymayerj@missouri.edu
  2. 2. “Here’s something four-year-olds know: a screenwithout a mouse is missing something. Here’ssomething else they know: media that’s targeted atyou but doesn’t include you may not be worthsitting still for. … They will just assume that mediaincludes the possibilities of consuming, producing,and sharing side by side, and that thosepossibilities are open to everyone. How else wouldyou do it?”— Clay Shirky, Cognitive Surplus
  3. 3. Where’sthe mouse?Consume. Produce. Share.
  4. 4. “Mutualisation” at The Guardian= a constant invitationModel from @MegPickard
  5. 5. “Mutualisation” at The Guardian= a constant invitationModel from @MegPickard
  6. 6. Our invitations tendto be segmented.
  7. 7. How can we makeour invitations …continual?specific?genuine?easy?
  8. 8. Is the interaction —inviting, talking andlistening —really part of ournewsroom culture?
  9. 9. If we tell users we wantto hear from them,are we prepared to follow up?Are we willing to share our agenda-setting duties?
  10. 10. Shared control.Vulnerability.(like a real relationship?)
  11. 11. Are we asking for feedback?
  12. 12. And do we really want it?
  13. 13. But what if users want totalk about somethingwe’re not prepared for?
  14. 14. But what if they have needsthat don’t line up with ours?
  15. 15. But what if their ideas orsuggestions are …bad?
  16. 16. What if they don’t want what wethink they should want?
  17. 17. Are we as focused onmeeting their needs aswe are on enabling themto meet ours?
  18. 18. What will happenif we hand themthe microphone?
  19. 19. “Covering” youth crime
  20. 20. “Covering” youth crime
  21. 21. “Covering” youth crime
  22. 22. “Covering” youth crime
  23. 23. “Covering” youth crime
  24. 24. How do you make the mousemore obvious?How do you help your newsroomssee the value?Is your newsroom ready to listen?

How do we keep our journalism focused on and collaborative with our audiences? Presentation to Public Insight Network Camp, June 2013, at American Public Media

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