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Who’s the audience? 
Participatory Journalism class expands 
the life cycle of a community’s story 
Joy Mayer | @mayerjoy ...
⋙100th anniversary 
of a bizarre high 
school mascot 
⋙Plenty of coverage 
planned. But who’s it 
for? And how do we 
make...
⋙Let the community 
know what you’re 
working on. 
⋙Invite them to 
participate — and 
to invite others 
to participate
⋙Watch for what users 
say, and follow up leads. 
⋙This one led to a 
story we weren’t 
planning to write.
⋙Run highlights from 
social comments in the 
“From Readers” section 
⋙Roll these out early, 
and tag Facebook 
participan...
⋙Run highlights as 
print teases throughout 
the week leading up to 
the big package
Talk concretely about the audience. 
⋙Who would most 
enjoy the content? 
⋙Where do they 
already get and share 
informati...
⋙Post in Facebook 
groups where alums 
spend time. Also with 
school-related Twitter 
accounts.
⋙Make a flier with 
coverage highlights. 
Take 500 copies to 
a home game. 
⋙Include a url to track. 
How many people 
con...
⋙Sell an ad on the 
back to the school’s 
booster club.
⋙Provide Snapchat 
coverage from the 
game. Reach the 
young audience where 
they are.
⋙Healthy web analytics 
across the package, with 
high percentage from 
Facebook. 
⋙Participation and buy-in 
from communi...
If it works, repeat it. If not, don’t. 
But treat it all as an experiment.
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Participatory Journalism: Teaching an expanded life cycle for a community story

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A presentation for the Green Shoots event at the Reynolds Journalism Institute, Oct. 30, 2014.

Published in: News & Politics
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Participatory Journalism: Teaching an expanded life cycle for a community story

  1. 1. Who’s the audience? Participatory Journalism class expands the life cycle of a community’s story Joy Mayer | @mayerjoy | mayerj@missouri.edu
  2. 2. ⋙100th anniversary of a bizarre high school mascot ⋙Plenty of coverage planned. But who’s it for? And how do we make it social?
  3. 3. ⋙Let the community know what you’re working on. ⋙Invite them to participate — and to invite others to participate
  4. 4. ⋙Watch for what users say, and follow up leads. ⋙This one led to a story we weren’t planning to write.
  5. 5. ⋙Run highlights from social comments in the “From Readers” section ⋙Roll these out early, and tag Facebook participants when their comments publish.
  6. 6. ⋙Run highlights as print teases throughout the week leading up to the big package
  7. 7. Talk concretely about the audience. ⋙Who would most enjoy the content? ⋙Where do they already get and share information? ⋙How could we take our content to them in those places and on those platforms?
  8. 8. ⋙Post in Facebook groups where alums spend time. Also with school-related Twitter accounts.
  9. 9. ⋙Make a flier with coverage highlights. Take 500 copies to a home game. ⋙Include a url to track. How many people consume full content based on handout?
  10. 10. ⋙Sell an ad on the back to the school’s booster club.
  11. 11. ⋙Provide Snapchat coverage from the game. Reach the young audience where they are.
  12. 12. ⋙Healthy web analytics across the package, with high percentage from Facebook. ⋙Participation and buy-in from community throughout the process. ⋙A truly social life cycle for this community story. ⋙The main crowdsourcing Facebook post reached 15,000 users. ⋙We made $150 selling an ad based on customized distribution. ⋙Track url from handout. More than half of recipients went to website. Then ask: What “worked”?
  13. 13. If it works, repeat it. If not, don’t. But treat it all as an experiment.

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