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Delivering the Goods

Best Practices in Design and Delivery of Instruction for the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care

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Delivering the Goods

  1. 1. Delivering the Goods Best Practices in Design and Delivery of Instruction July 6, 2018 Max Anderson, MLIS, MS (PhD Candidate) Instructional Designer – UICOM max@uic.edu
  2. 2. Learning Objectives • Differentiate between best practices for content delivery methods appropriate for noon conferences, mini-teaching sessions, and micro-teaching. • Explain how differences in PowerPoint design impact retention of information. • Determine how observing others deliver content is an potential alternative to evaluations. 2
  3. 3. My role • Instructional Designer (MS) • Medical Librarian (MLIS) • Educational Technologist • PhD Candidate 3
  4. 4. 5
  5. 5. 6 What do you want the student to be able to do at the end of an instructional session?
  6. 6. Design 7
  7. 7. 8 Design Choose textbooks Write syllabus Write / Revise lectures Prepare PPT slides Write exam / problem sets Formulate broad learning goals Set specific learning objectives Design assessments Develop learning activities Which one is more student-centered?
  8. 8. 9 Design
  9. 9. 10
  10. 10. Creating Presentations: Some basic tips • Plan • Practice • Design consistency • Don’t read your slides • Cite 11
  11. 11. 12 What would you do differently?
  12. 12. 13 What would you do differently?
  13. 13. 14 What would you do differently?
  14. 14. 15 What would you do differently?
  15. 15. 16 What would you do differently?
  16. 16. 17 What would you do differently?
  17. 17. 12 Principles of Multimedia Learning: Coherence Learning Objectives • You will be able to connect and log in to Epic. • You will be able to enter patient information into Epic. 18 Avoid extraneous words, pictures and sounds – less is more!
  18. 18. 12 Principles of Multimedia Learning: Spatial Contiguity 19 Place corresponding words near each other rather than away from each other versus
  19. 19. 12 Principles of Multimedia Learning: Signaling 20 Use cues that highlight the organization of essential material
  20. 20. 12 Principles of Multimedia Learning: Multimedia 21 People learn better from words and pictures rather than from words alone
  21. 21. Delivery 22
  22. 22. Facilitation (aka Delivery) • Noon conferences • Mini-teaching • Micro-teaching How are these different to you? 23
  23. 23. 24
  24. 24. Facilitation (aka Delivery) • Debrief and feedback • Near-peer role modeling • Self-reflection 25
  25. 25. 26 Self-reflection is a humbling process. It’s essential to find out why you think, say, and do certain things…and then better yourself.
  26. 26. Self-Directed Learning • LCME Element 6.3 • How do learners view themselves as learners? • Are there demands on a learning situation that influence the capacity for self-direction? • As learners master subjects, the capacity to be self-directed is enhanced • Situated learning – learning is inseparable from situations where knowledge is used • Knowledge is socially constructed • Knowledge is dependent on context for meaning 27
  27. 27. Facilitation (aka Delivery): Keys to asking effective questions • Ask one question at a time • Wait 3 seconds before and after the student answers • Stay neutral until after the student has explained the answer • Use higher-order, open-ended questions • Create a safe environment that permits students to answer incorrectly or to guess How do you ask questions? How do you deal with clear gaps in knowledge? 28 Riddle, J. (2010). Teaching clinical skills. In W. B. Jeffries & K. N. Huggett (eds.)., An introduction to medical teaching.
  28. 28. Facilitation (aka Delivery): Consultation Room • Consultation Room Training • Cognitive constructivism • Gagne (1985) says: • Cognitive phase: consciously develop a routine with cues from facilitator • Associative phase: deliberate practice to integrate component parts. • Autonomous phase: skill automatic to enable cognitive activity • Ask students how they would like to run the session – it’s really their time to learn. 29
  29. 29. Facilitation (aka Delivery) Follow the STEPS 30 Set the foundation Tutor demonstrations ExplanationPractice Subsequent deliberate practice
  30. 30. Observation as Evaluation 31
  31. 31. Observation Forms 32 Clinical Care Teaching Observation Form Lecture Teaching Observation Form Small Group Teaching Observation Form
  32. 32. Reporting Out 33
  33. 33. Learning Objectives • Differentiate between best practices for content delivery methods appropriate for noon conferences, mini-teaching sessions, and micro-teaching. • Explain how differences in PowerPoint design impact retention of information. • Determine how observing others deliver content is an potential alternative to evaluations. 34
  34. 34. References Dent, J. A., & Harden, R. M. (2013). A practical guide for medical teachers. (4th ed). Elsevier. Harden, R. M., & Laidlaw, J. M. (2012). Essential skills for a medical teacher: An introduction to teaching and learning in medicine. Elsevier. Jeffries, W. B., & Huggett, K. N. (2010). An introduction to medical teaching. New York: Springer. Kaufman, D. M., & Mann, K. V. (2010). Teaching and learning in medical education: How theory can inform practice. In T. Swanwick (ed.)., Understanding medical education: Evidence, theory and practice. Association for the Study of Medical Education. 35
  35. 35. References Kessler, C. S., Chan, T., Loeb, J. M., & Malka, S. T. (2013). I’m clear, you’re clear, we’re all clear: Improving consultation communication skills in undergraduate medical education. Academic Medicine, 88(6), 753-758. Khalil, M. K., & Elkhider, I. A. (2016). Applying learning theories and instructional design models for effective instruction. Advancements in Physiology Education, 40, 147-156. Wong, B. M. et al. (2017). Faculty-resident “co-learning”: A longitudinal exploration of an innovative model for faculty development in quality improvement. Academic Medicine, 92(8), 1151-1159. 36

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