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Neso nuffic presentation in Seoul

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Neso nuffic presentation in Seoul

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  1. 1. Korean Online politics in an International perspectiveMaurice Vergeerwith the assistance of Yon Soo Lim, PhD and Se Jung Park, MA<br />Presentation held at Neso, Seoul, South Korea, June 22, 2011<br />This research was supported by WCU (World Class University) program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (No. 515-82-06574).<br />
  2. 2. Outline<br />Introduction<br />Online politics<br />Korean online politics<br />International perspective<br />
  3. 3. WCU project<br />Webometrics Institute, Yeungnam University<br />Hyperlink analysis<br />Professor Han Woo Park<br />Chien-leng Hsu<br />Content analysis and semantic network analysis<br />Yon Soo Lim<br />Se Jung Park<br />
  4. 4. Politics in general<br />Decline in voter turnout in elections<br />Declining trust in politics and politicians in general<br />Not a national problem, but an international one<br />
  5. 5.
  6. 6.
  7. 7. Problem <br />How to engage people into politics?<br />
  8. 8. New campaign strategies<br />
  9. 9.
  10. 10.
  11. 11.
  12. 12.
  13. 13. Several communication options<br />Website communication<br />Web feature analysis<br />Blogging <br />Online Social networking<br />Cyworld<br />Micro-blogging<br />Twitter<br />
  14. 14. Innovation hypothesis<br /> versus<br />Normalisation hypothesis<br />Equalisation hypothesis<br />
  15. 15. Micro-blogging<br />Twitter<br />Launched in 2007<br />Social networking service<br />Micro-blogging tool<br />RenRen<br />Me2Day<br />Cyworld<br />Plurk<br />Facebook<br />Linkedin<br />
  16. 16. South Korean population: 50 million people<br />The Netherlands: 17 million people<br />2.1 million South Korean users<br />400.000 Dutch users<br />
  17. 17. General adoption rate of Twitter<br />South Korea: 4.2%<br />Netherlands: 2.4<br />
  18. 18. Twitter in Korean parliament<br />
  19. 19. Korean parliament<br />Sampled all parliament members<br />Including some that left in the last 14 months<br />Data collection<br />Official resources<br />Dedicated software for downloading Twitter datausing a so-called API (applicationprogramming interface)<br />
  20. 20. Adoption of Twitter<br />Overall 64.7 percent adopted Twitter as a micro-blogging tool<br />Grand National Party: 68.6%<br />Democratic Party: 62.9%<br />Other parties: 52.4%<br />
  21. 21. Adoption of Twitter<br />On average they signup to Twitter more than a year ago (i.e. 412 days)<br />Grand National Party: 388 days ago<br />Democratic Party: 445 days ago<br />Other parties: 459 days ago<br />
  22. 22. Male and female politicians subscribed to Twitter at about the same time<br />Politicians with an MA degree subscribed to Twitter slightly earlier<br />
  23. 23. Types of Twitter relations<br />
  24. 24.
  25. 25.
  26. 26.
  27. 27.
  28. 28. Bivariateanalysis of Twitterbehavior<br />
  29. 29.
  30. 30.
  31. 31.
  32. 32.
  33. 33. South Korea compared to the Netherlands<br />
  34. 34.
  35. 35. Results logistic regression of adoption of twitter<br />
  36. 36. Results negative binomial regression analysis of Twitter activities<br />
  37. 37. Results negative binomial regression analysis of Twitter activities<br />
  38. 38. Results negative binomial regression analysis of Twitter activities<br />
  39. 39. Results negative binomial regression analysis of Twitter activities<br />
  40. 40. Conclusion<br />Innovationornormalisation?<br />Those in power (GNP) are lessactiveadopting and usingnew (social) media<br />Long time membersthat have an account predominantlyuseit to createnetworks, not to communicatedirectly (i.e. tweet)<br />
  41. 41. Koreanpoliticiansseem to usesocial media as social media<br />Dutch politiciansseem to useTwitter as a mass media<br />
  42. 42. Thankyouforyourattention<br />Maurice Vergeer<br />www.mauricevergeer.nl<br />

Transcript

  1. 1. Korean Online politics in an International perspectiveMaurice Vergeerwith the assistance of Yon Soo Lim, PhD and Se Jung Park, MA<br />Presentation held at Neso, Seoul, South Korea, June 22, 2011<br />This research was supported by WCU (World Class University) program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (No. 515-82-06574).<br />
  2. 2. Outline<br />Introduction<br />Online politics<br />Korean online politics<br />International perspective<br />
  3. 3. WCU project<br />Webometrics Institute, Yeungnam University<br />Hyperlink analysis<br />Professor Han Woo Park<br />Chien-leng Hsu<br />Content analysis and semantic network analysis<br />Yon Soo Lim<br />Se Jung Park<br />
  4. 4. Politics in general<br />Decline in voter turnout in elections<br />Declining trust in politics and politicians in general<br />Not a national problem, but an international one<br />
  5. 5.
  6. 6.
  7. 7. Problem <br />How to engage people into politics?<br />
  8. 8. New campaign strategies<br />
  9. 9.
  10. 10.
  11. 11.
  12. 12.
  13. 13. Several communication options<br />Website communication<br />Web feature analysis<br />Blogging <br />Online Social networking<br />Cyworld<br />Micro-blogging<br />Twitter<br />
  14. 14. Innovation hypothesis<br /> versus<br />Normalisation hypothesis<br />Equalisation hypothesis<br />
  15. 15. Micro-blogging<br />Twitter<br />Launched in 2007<br />Social networking service<br />Micro-blogging tool<br />RenRen<br />Me2Day<br />Cyworld<br />Plurk<br />Facebook<br />Linkedin<br />
  16. 16. South Korean population: 50 million people<br />The Netherlands: 17 million people<br />2.1 million South Korean users<br />400.000 Dutch users<br />
  17. 17. General adoption rate of Twitter<br />South Korea: 4.2%<br />Netherlands: 2.4<br />
  18. 18. Twitter in Korean parliament<br />
  19. 19. Korean parliament<br />Sampled all parliament members<br />Including some that left in the last 14 months<br />Data collection<br />Official resources<br />Dedicated software for downloading Twitter datausing a so-called API (applicationprogramming interface)<br />
  20. 20. Adoption of Twitter<br />Overall 64.7 percent adopted Twitter as a micro-blogging tool<br />Grand National Party: 68.6%<br />Democratic Party: 62.9%<br />Other parties: 52.4%<br />
  21. 21. Adoption of Twitter<br />On average they signup to Twitter more than a year ago (i.e. 412 days)<br />Grand National Party: 388 days ago<br />Democratic Party: 445 days ago<br />Other parties: 459 days ago<br />
  22. 22. Male and female politicians subscribed to Twitter at about the same time<br />Politicians with an MA degree subscribed to Twitter slightly earlier<br />
  23. 23. Types of Twitter relations<br />
  24. 24.
  25. 25.
  26. 26.
  27. 27.
  28. 28. Bivariateanalysis of Twitterbehavior<br />
  29. 29.
  30. 30.
  31. 31.
  32. 32.
  33. 33. South Korea compared to the Netherlands<br />
  34. 34.
  35. 35. Results logistic regression of adoption of twitter<br />
  36. 36. Results negative binomial regression analysis of Twitter activities<br />
  37. 37. Results negative binomial regression analysis of Twitter activities<br />
  38. 38. Results negative binomial regression analysis of Twitter activities<br />
  39. 39. Results negative binomial regression analysis of Twitter activities<br />
  40. 40. Conclusion<br />Innovationornormalisation?<br />Those in power (GNP) are lessactiveadopting and usingnew (social) media<br />Long time membersthat have an account predominantlyuseit to createnetworks, not to communicatedirectly (i.e. tweet)<br />
  41. 41. Koreanpoliticiansseem to usesocial media as social media<br />Dutch politiciansseem to useTwitter as a mass media<br />
  42. 42. Thankyouforyourattention<br />Maurice Vergeer<br />www.mauricevergeer.nl<br />

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