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1 Families Timeline: 1950s to Pesent Day

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1 Families Timeline: 1950s to Pesent Day

  1. 1. 1AQA Sociology AS Level © Nelson Thornes 2008 Unit 1, Section 2 Families and households timeline
  2. 2. 2AQA Sociology AS Level © Nelson Thornes 2008 Unit 1, Section 2 1950s – Traditional families • Most children lived with both their biological parents. • Most parents remained married for life. In the 1950s most people lived in traditional families.
  3. 3. 3AQA Sociology AS Level © Nelson Thornes 2008 Unit 1, Section 2 • Men and women had different roles. • The man was usually the breadwinner. • The wife stayed at home as the housewife and mother. 1950s – Clear division of labour
  4. 4. 4AQA Sociology AS Level © Nelson Thornes 2008 Unit 1, Section 2 • Most couples got married before they lived together. • Most people got married before they had children. • Divorce rates were low. • We do not know how many marriages were unhappy. 1950s – Marriage
  5. 5. 5AQA Sociology AS Level © Nelson Thornes 2008 Unit 1, Section 2 The Women’s Movement asked for: • equal pay • freedom from sexual discrimination • the right to control their fertility through free contraception. 1960s/70s – Changes in women’s roles
  6. 6. 6AQA Sociology AS Level © Nelson Thornes 2008 Unit 1, Section 2 1960s/70s – Divorce Law Reform Act (1969) • the right to divorce without blame. • to divorce after two years if both partners agree, or after five years even without agreement. The result was that rates of divorce, which had already increased by this time, now rose sharply. Allowed couples:
  7. 7. 7AQA Sociology AS Level © Nelson Thornes 2008 Unit 1, Section 2 1980s/90s – Ethnic diversity • Britain becomes more diverse. • Black Caribbean and South Asian communities bring different patterns of family life to Britain. • Black Caribbean children are more likely to live with a lone parent. • South Asian families are more likely to be traditional.
  8. 8. 8AQA Sociology AS Level © Nelson Thornes 2008 Unit 1, Section 2 1980s/90s – New Right governments • New Right governments attack single parents. • The Child Support Agency chases ‘absent fathers’ for financial support for their biological children. • The New Right strongly support traditional families. Divorce continues to rise.
  9. 9. 9AQA Sociology AS Level © Nelson Thornes 2008 Unit 1, Section 2 1980s/90s – New Labour governments • New Labour is more sympathetic to family diversity than the New Right. • New Labour focuses on people in need, particularly children in poverty. • The attack on single parents stops.
  10. 10. 10AQA Sociology AS Level © Nelson Thornes 2008 Unit 1, Section 2 Twenty-first century – New Labour policies • Tax credits for children are introduced to reduce child poverty. • Maternity leave is improved and paternity leave introduced, although few fathers take advantage of paternity leave. • The Conservative Party attacks the Labour government for not supporting marriage. • All parties become concerned about the cost of supporting the elderly.
  11. 11. 11AQA Sociology AS Level © Nelson Thornes 2008 Unit 1, Section 2 • Marriage rates fall. • Many marriages are remarriages. • Large numbers of young people cohabit before marrying. • Large numbers of children live with a single parent or a step-parent. • Divorce rates stabilise. • People marry later. Twenty-first century – Divorce and cohabitation
  12. 12. 12AQA Sociology AS Level © Nelson Thornes 2008 Unit 1, Section 2 Twenty-first century – New technology • New technology makes it possible to extend child-bearing. • ‘Test-tube’ babies and babies with surrogate mothers are born. • Some of these changes can arouse considerable controversy.
  13. 13. 13AQA Sociology AS Level © Nelson Thornes 2008 Unit 1, Section 2 Twenty-first century – Civil partnerships • Same-sex couples gain the right to civil partnerships in 2005. • Same-sex couples also gain similar legal rights to married couples.

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