Tech Musings

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This slide show is a collection of thoughts about how the Internet of Things has come into be and a brief discussion of where it is going. I hope you like it!

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Tech Musings

  1. 1. Musings  on  Technology  and   Humanity  
  2. 2. Advances  in  technology  have  been   altering  daily  life  con9nuously  since   the  dawn  of  9me.  
  3. 3. Such  a  statement  might  seem  bold   on  the  surface  but  if  we  look  a  li>le   deeper,  we  can  see  that  the  above   statement  is  a  truism.  
  4. 4. Once  humans  mastered   pyrotechnology,  civiliza9on  could   take  hold.  
  5. 5. The  iron  age,  the  bronze  age,  the   Industrial  Revolu9on  —  all  pivotal   9mes  in  humani9es  development,   soon  followed  humanity’s  control   over  fire.  
  6. 6. In  more  modern  terms,  bringing   electricity  into  the  home  was  a  huge   change  for  how  people  lived  their   daily  lives.  
  7. 7. A  radio  in  every  home,  replaced   soon  enough  by  the  television,   increased  the  speed  of  informa9on   drama9cally.  
  8. 8. The  telephone  connected  us  in  a   way  unforeseen.  
  9. 9. And  in  the  our  recent  memory,  the   personal  computer,  coupled  with  the   Internet,  has  had  tremendous  effect   on  our  daily  lives.  
  10. 10. The  connec9vity  provided  by  the   Internet  has  dras9cally  changed   social  interac9on,  business,  poli9cs,   educa9on  ad  infinitum.  
  11. 11. These  asser9ons  lead  to  us  to  a   logical  ques9on:  What’s  next?  
  12. 12. The  Internet  of  Things  refers  to  a   scenario  where  people,  things  and   animals  are  equipped  with  a  piece  of   technology  capable  of  sending  and   receiving  data  without  the  direct   interac9on  of  human  to  human  or   human  to  computer.  
  13. 13. The  connec9vity  is  inherent  in  their   design.  Radio-­‐frequency  iden9fiers   are  the  primary  example  used  to   describe  this  scenario.  
  14. 14. The  most  obvious  applica9on  is   for  inventory  purposes.  
  15. 15. If  you  have  a  warehouse  stocked   with  thousands  of  separate,  unique   pieces  of  stock,  it  is  a  huge  challenge   to  keep  everything  organized.    
  16. 16. While  companies  have  been   naviga9ng  these  challenges  for   years,  RFIDs  offer  a  solu9on.  
  17. 17. If  all  the  items  in  this  imaginary   warehouse  are  equipped  with  a   device  that  can  send  and  receive   data,  then  the  process  of  located  it   is  streamlined  like  never  before.  
  18. 18. All  you  would  have  to  ask  and   the  object  could  reply.  
  19. 19. Holding  up  a  receiver  that  searches   for  the  specific  frequency  produced   by  the  object’s  device  would  lead   you  straight  to  the  object  you  seek.  
  20. 20. The  warehouse  example  was  in  the   forefront  of  the  conversa9on  when   RFIDs  became  affordable  on  a  mass   scale.  
  21. 21. But  we  can  extrapolate  the  concepts   at  play  and  look  toward  the  future  of   human/technology  interac9on.  
  22. 22. The  Internet  of  Things  
  23. 23. Aside  from  the  conversa9on  about   RFIDs,  connec9vity  in  devices  has   been  increasing  tremendously.  
  24. 24. You  phone  can  talk  with  your   computer,  you  music  device  can   connect  via  Blue  Tooth  to  your  car’s   stereo,  etc.  
  25. 25. These  connec9ons  are  establishing  a   network  of  informa9on  —  an   Internet  of  Things.  But  we  can   expand  our  view  of  what  the  ‘things’   can  be.  
  26. 26. It  could  be  a  pa9ents  pace-­‐maker   device  communica9ng  with  a   hospital,  a  farm  animals  biometric   device  communica9ng  with  the   farmer,  or  a  sensor  on  a  car’s   bumper  that  9ghtens  the  seatbelt   milliseconds  before  a  collision.  
  27. 27. We  can  see  how  these  examples  are   not  super  far  fetched;  in  fact  they   may  already  exist  in  some  form.  
  28. 28. As  the  cost  of  small,  accessible   devices  goes  down,  we  can  expect   to  see  them  more  regularly   integrated  into  the  products  we  use   on  a  daily  basis.  
  29. 29. If  your  milk  carton  has  such  a  device   (not  necessarily  a  RFID),  then  your   ‘smart-­‐fridge’  can  alert  you  when  it   is  reaching  it’s  expira9on  date.  
  30. 30. And  as  grocery  delivery  services   become  for  normal,  your   refrigerator  could  automa9cally   order  more  milk  from  your  favorite   store  once  yours  is  running  low.  
  31. 31. Your  weekly  groceries,  ordered   automa9cally,  delivered  by  drone,   could  all  be  done  without  your   direct  ac9on  (aside  from  ini9al  setup   and  consent).  
  32. 32.  Your  smart  microwave  would  know   exactly  how  long  to  cook  your  Hot   Pocket  by  communica9ng  with  the   box  it  comes  in.  
  33. 33. A  bu>on  on  your  TV  remote  could   be  pressed  to  automa9cally  order   whatever  product  is  featured   onscreen.  
  34. 34. Beyond  these  consumer  based   applica9ons,  the  Internet  of  Things   as  many  logis9cal  uses  as  well.  
  35. 35. Having  subway  cars  communicated   con9nuously  with  a  central  control   board  would  expedite  mass  transit   in  New  York  City,  which  has  already   started  in  London.  
  36. 36. If  your  trash  can  knows  how  full  it  is,   it  can  sent  informa9on  that  will  help   city  planners  determine  routes  for   sanita9on  workers.  
  37. 37. Some  assert  that  the  Internet  of   Things  will  be  our  genera9on’s   electricity  —  which  is  to  say  a   fundamental  shi^  in  how  human’s   interact  with  and  use  technology.  
  38. 38. Musings  on  Technology  and   Humanity  

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