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Technology-Enhanced Learning Strategies - Unravelling student expectations

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This paper details how early-capture survey data and continuous student feedback has informed practice within a social science department at the University of York. It will show how results from a survey of first year students at the very start of their degree course, loosely based on the ECAR studies in the US (Smith and Caruso 2010), have fed into departmental teaching strategy and provided a solid knowledge-base for academic staff to understand the way students engage with ICT and their expectations of how technology-enhanced learning should be included within degree programmes. This increase in understanding is hypothesised to be a contributory factor to the high buy-in from academic staff in the use of learning technologies within this department. Presented at ALT-C 2012.

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Technology-Enhanced Learning Strategies - Unravelling student expectations

  1. 1. Unravelling student expectations The use of early data and student feedback to inform implementation ALT-C, University of Manchester, 11 September 2012 Matt Cornock University of York Complete presentation notes available at mattcornock.co.uk
  2. 2. This approach can address • Differing levels of adoption by staff • Quality agendas • Assumptions about students © 2012 University of York
  3. 3. Challenging assumptions iPhone - http://www.flickr.com/photos/williamhook/4742869256/ Books - http://www.flickr.com/photos/osiatynska/3287986172/ © 2012 University of York
  4. 4. Challenging assumptions: survey What IT training would you be interested in? 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% © 2012 University of York
  5. 5. Quality agenda: Welcome Sites • Institutional driver • Student focus groups • Student survey feedback • Led to in-house evidence about online facilitation © 2012 University of York
  6. 6. Staff adoption: anticipating risk takers LT survey: Should Facebook be used for learning and teaching activities? 60% 40% 20% 0% Yes No Don't Know School Leavers Non-School Leavers © 2012 University of York
  7. 7. Staff adoption: enabling risk takers © 2012 University of York
  8. 8. Points of evaluation Students’ Learning Technologies Initial Engagement with VLE Module Feedback Opportunities to exploit device ownership User interface and user interaction Specific issues around learning design Addressing confidence and training gaps Content development Establishing ‘best’ and ‘worst’ practice © 2012 University of York
  9. 9. Model for implementation Implementation Department Strategy Students’ Learning Technologies Learning Design Initial Engagement with VLE Students Module Feedback Staff Institution © 2012 University of York Innovation Proactively driven
  10. 10. Model for implementation Implementation Department Strategy Students’ Learning Technologies Learning Design Initial Engagement with VLE Students Module Feedback Staff Institution © 2012 University of York Innovation Proactively fed back
  11. 11. Summary • • • • Utilise student information early on Adapt approaches: ad hoc or formal review Review implementation Key benefits – Enabling staff – Develop an ethos of improvement – Focused on the student experience © 2012 University of York
  12. 12. References Flavin, M. (2012). Disruptive technologies in higher education. ALT-C 2012 Conference Proceedings. Mazur, E. (2012) The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design. Keynote presentation, ALT-C 2012 Conference, 11 September 2012, Manchester, UK. NUS/HEFCE (2010) Student perspectives on technology – demand, perceptions and training needs. Report to HEFCE by NUS. Available at http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/rereports/year/2010/studpersptech/ (last accessed 21 September 2012). Russell, C. (2009). A systematic framework for managing e-learning adoption in campus universities: individual strategies in context. ALT-J, Research in Learning Technology, 17(1), 3-19. Smith, S. D. and Caruso, J. B. (2010) ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2010. Research Study, Vol. 6. Boulder, CO: EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research. Wenham, A. and Cornock, M. (2012). Engaging students in online social spaces: Experiences of using Facebook for teaching and learning. Learning and Teaching Conference, University of York, 16 May 2012. © 2012 University of York

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