Smart Labs Labs21

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Creating Smart Energy Efficient Labs

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  • Thanks for letting us share our Smart Labs concept with this group. MG and background…
  • UC Irvine is a growing…
  • We are constantly challenging ourselves to save energy. Our recipe for taking on these ambitious projects is to have a multi-disciplinary team of professionals focused on a common goal.
  • Here is an overview of what I plan to talk about. Lets take a few minutes to overview our Smart Lab concept
  • Our goal at UC Irvine is to find the sweet spot where we balance lab safety and climate safety It is also our goal to outperform ASHRAE 90.1 or CA Title 24 by approximately 50%... To accomplish this we are…
  • The idea is to combine these ideas into one building, new or retrofit…
  • There are many features to the Smart Lab. We are evolving from current best practices to these Smart Lab parameters.
  • Lets talk about CDCV
  • This CDCV system begins with: room sensors to measure the quality of the air in many locations of a building An air router pulls the air sample to the Centralized sensor suite that analyzes the air sample for… An information management server tells the VAV controller to increase or decrease air flow All this data is logged into a computer for analysis
  • The result is by monitoring air contaminants, we can make decisions about reducing or increasing ventilation rates in the building
  • The question of “does higher air changes is a lab, make it safer” is a good one. A recent article by Tom Smith with Exposure Control Technologies concludes that…
  • This is a summary of the CA ventilation code requirements The column on the left…
  • We are partnering with CalOSHA to allow the use of LFFH’s in the state This is a slow process but we are well on our way to using these hoods on our campus
  • The LFFH is a deeper hood with better capture and less turbulence so it can capture contaminants with less air flow. High performance fume hoods are more energy efficient than conventional hoods because of their lower total exhaust volumes. They are designed Low flow hoods take air entering through the sash opening and form a roll in the upper chamber called a vortex. This vortex enhances the hood’s containment capability and has been engineered so that it will not break down and collapse. A sensor within the hood sidewall prevents potential vortex collapse by automatically adjusting the rear baffle slots in real time. High Performance Fume Hood Components   Vortex Chamber has been designed to optimize the flow of the vortex within the hood to provide maximum containment at lower exhaust volumes and face velocities. Vortex Control System measures the stability of the vortex airflow pattern within the hood chamber and automatically adjusts the articulating baffle to maintain maximum containment.   Figure 4: High performance fume hood components   Articulating Baffles are designed so that the slot positions change when the baffle is adjusted by the Vortex controls.   Front Turning Vane increases the stability of the vortex within the fume hood.
  • Highest tracer gas results were .04 and .03 for the low flow hood and standard hood respectfully, less than ½ of 0.1 ppm The test protocol involved conducting more than 168 tracer gas containment tests on each of the fume hoods.
  • We did a comparison of the cost associated with Outline ZPS and ASC definitions. Start at CAV at 100fpm and go left to right and down.
  • There is a lot of energy to be saved with…
  • What we are concerned about is the re-entrainment of contaminated air. We begin with a building and the prevailing wind. Within the building, contaminants are generated. An exhaust system needs to exhaust these contaminants out so they are not re-entrained into the building or to nearby individuals. As Marc stated earlier, not only are we trying to save energy but look for the sweet spot where we balance lab safety and climate safety Discuss components of system… Note the plumes and effects on dispersion of short/tall stacks and low/high exit velocities. So, we would likely select a taller stack for energy reduction which allows us to reduce the fan speed and exit velocity.
  • AS WE HAVE LEARNED, VENTILATION EXHAUST IS OVERLY CONSERVATIVE. IN ORDER TO CHALLENGE THE CONSERVATIVE ASSUMPTIONS A WIND TUNNEL WAS BUILT. Using wind tunnel testing, we challenged the conservative assumptions on which buildings are designed. Wind tunnel testing is based on fluid dynamic similarity modeling—like wind tunnel tests of aircraft wings. Once the test is properly set up, we can measure in the wind tunnel almost anything related to wind and multiply it by the appropriate scale factor to determine the full-scale real-world value. The dilution of exhaust plumes is one of the wind-related parameters which can be well modeled in the wind tunnel. The wind tunnel is the only means available today to accurately model wind flow and related parameters around buildings. If you are considering using alternative methods such as desktop calculations or Computational Fluid Dynamics for this purpose, please talk to me off-line. I can provide references to articles in the technical literature which clearly describe the shortcomings of non-wind-tunnel approaches. The first step in setting up a wind tunnel test is to build an accurate scale model of the building under study and the buildings, terrain and trees around it. You need to extend the model out about ¼ mile in all directions to take account of the effects of upwind buildings, etc on the wind and turbulence at the building under study. Here we see the model used in this study for the Biological Sciences 3 and Natural Sciences 1 lab buildings. They are the blue buildings in the center. The model is at a scale of 1:200 and includes terrain and trees as well as buildings for ¼ mile radius. The accuracy of the model is directly related to the accuracy of the results. So it is important to put sufficient effort into recreating a model which accurately represents the existing buildings as well as those which are expected to be built within the next few years. The model is mounted on a turntable will is rotated by the wind tunnel operator to model different wind directions. In this photo, you are looking upwind and can see the wood blocks which are used to create the proper profile of wind speed and turbulence in the air approaching the test model—more about that a little later.
  • FOR THE WIND TUNNEL DATA TO ACCURATE, A MODEL OF THE CAMPUS WAS BUILT AND INCLUDES AN ABUNDANCE OF SAMPLING RECEPTORS. Tubes are installed in the model to take air samples at locations where the concentration of the exhaust plume might be important. The jargon term for these points is “receptors.” The locations are indicated by the numbered arrows. Note that some of the receptors use blue plastic fixtures which are designed to take their sample at a height of about 5 feet full scale. This is representative of the breathing zone for the average person.
  • The wind tunnel testing told us we can frequently save energy by: Raising stack heights Installing variable speed fans and reducing exhaust system flows, 15,000 cfm per stack Disabling existing by pass dampers Run more fans at lower speed
  • Here is an artists rendering of stack heights increased 5 feet, WHICH IS NOT TOO NOTICIBLE.
  • WE APPLIED WHAT WE LEARNED FROM THE WIND TUNNEL STUDY TO ONE OF OUR CAMPUS BUILDINGS – CROUL HALL, AND INSTALLED… Dynamic SP Reset based on demand inside the building
  • LETS LOOK AT SMART LIGHTING CONTROLS… Lets look at smart lighting controls
  • We are reducing our lab lighting power density by 50% IN OUR LAB AREAS, LAB PREP AND CORRIDORS.
  • TO ACHIEVE THE REDUCED POWER DENSITY We have lowered the blinds to allow for more natural light..
  • We are controlling the lights next to windows with daylight sensors
  • We are installing motion detection to turn on lights at 50% lighting An individual must manually turn on the lights to get 100% lighting
  • Here is a photo of the ceiling with 50% lighting
  • IN GROSS HALL WE ADDED PREFORATED BLINDS
  • We have been able to install many of our Smart Lab features into Gross Hall
  • Next month, our Stem Cell building, Gross Hall opens
  • WE HAVE INSTALLED THE FOLLOWING SMART LAB FEATURES INTO GROSS HALL, WHICH I WILL HIGHLIGHT A FEW AS MARC SHARED EARLIER THE CENTRALIZED DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION OCCUPANCY BASED CONTROLS THAT CONTROL BOTH VENTILATION AND LIGHTING NATURAL VENTILATION – OPERABLE WINDOWS LINKED TO THE MECHANICAL VENTILATION HAVING THE RIGHT SIZED BUILDING EXHUAST SYSTEM THAT ELIMINATES BYPASS AIR
  • Allow us to significantly reduce building exhaust airflow
  • … THAT ALLOW OCCUPANTS TO HAVE NATURAL VENTILATION
  • SMART LAB FEATURES OF GROSS HALL PROVIDES A “SAFETY NET” THAT ALLOWS OCCUPANTS TO SEE WHAT’S HAPPENING IN THEIR SPACE. THIS IMAGE IS THE DISPLAY PANEL PROVIDING THE AIR CHANGES PER HOUR
  • ANOTHER FEATURE OF THE “SAFETY Net” – IS THE VENTILATION PURGE RED BUTTON.
  • TRAINING DOCUMENT IS PROVIDED TO OCCUPANTS ON THE SMART LAB FEATURES
  • For Gross Hall… WE ARE ESTIMATING ANUNUAL ENERGY SAVINGS OF: ABOUT 890,000 kWh, AND APPROXIMATELY 22,000 THERMS OF NATURAL GAS WITH AN ESTIMATED ENERGY SAVINGS OF ABOUT $110,000 THIS BUILDING WAS SUBMITTED FOR LEED NEW CONSTRUCTION SILVER, BUT MAY ACHIEVE GOLD LEVEL Reducing the kWh consumption kW is the (water pressure) SBD from SCE
  • HERE ARE SOME THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN IMPLEMENTING SMART LAB FEATURES: MAINTENANCE – THERE WILL BE MULTIPLE TRADES TO SERVICE THE VARIOUS COMPONENTS, SUCH AS:
  • ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT …. THERE IS NOT ONE UNIVERSAL CDCV SENSOR FOR ALL CHEMICALS AND YOU NEED TO PERFORM A RISK ASSESSMENT OF THE LAB OPERATIONS BEFORE CHOOSING THE APPROPRIATE SMART FEATURES. IN ADDITION, A LIFE CYCLE COST/PAYBACK ANALYSIS SHOULD BE PERFORMED.
  • Smart Labs Labs21

    1. 1. Smart Lab Buildings Marc Gomez, CIH, CSP, ARM, Interim Assistant Vice Chancellor, Facilities Management / Environmental Health & Safety Matt Gudorf Interim Campus Energy Manager, Energy Project Manager
    2. 2. University of California, Irvine <ul><li>Large research university </li></ul><ul><li>$16M annual utilities budget </li></ul><ul><li>Lab buildings consume 2/3 of campus energy </li></ul><ul><li>Many energy initiatives to reduce carbon footprint </li></ul>
    3. 3. Campus Energy $avings Team Synergy Safety Management Visionary & Supportive Upper Management Engineers Facility Managers Patience Supportive Users/ Researchers
    4. 4. Agenda <ul><li>Smart Lab Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation </li></ul><ul><li>Low Flow Fume Hoods </li></ul><ul><li>Exhaust System Optimization </li></ul><ul><li>Laboratory Smart Lighting Controls </li></ul><ul><li>Smart Lab Case Study: Gross Hall </li></ul>
    5. 5. Balancing Lab Safety & Climate Safety <ul><li>Create lab buildings that out perform ASHRAE 90.1 / CA Title 24 by 50% </li></ul><ul><li>Combine energy initiatives such as </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Centralized demand controlled ventilation (CDCV) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low flow (high performance) fume hoods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced building exhaust stack airspeeds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Energy-efficient lighting </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Smart Lab Building Concept Labs w/CDCV real time lab air monitoring 4 ach occupied 2 ach unoccupied Energy efficient lighting Labs with low flow fume hoods (as appropriate ) Building Exhaust System
    7. 7. Smart Lab Parameters <ul><ul><li> Current Best Practice Smart Lab Parameters </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Air-handler/filtration airspeeds 400 ft/min. max 350 ft/min. max </li></ul><ul><li>Total system (supply + exhaust) pressure-drop 6 in. w.g. <5 in. w.g. (incl. dirty filter allow.) </li></ul><ul><li>Duct noise attenuators Few None </li></ul><ul><li>Occupied lab air-changes/hr. (ACH) 6 ACH 4 ACH w/contaminant sensing </li></ul><ul><li>Night air-change setback (unoccupied) No setback 2 ACH w/occupancy + contaminant sensing </li></ul><ul><li> + no thermal inputs during setbacks </li></ul><ul><li>Low-flow/high-performance fume hoods No Yes, where hood density warrants </li></ul><ul><li>Fume hood face-velocities 100 FPM 70 FPM (low-flow hoods) </li></ul><ul><li>Fume hood face-velocities (unoccupied) 100 FPM 40 FPM (low-flow hoods) </li></ul><ul><li>Fume hood auto-closers None Where hood density high </li></ul><ul><li>Exhaust stack discharge velocity ~3,500 FPM Reduce or eliminate bypass air, </li></ul><ul><li> wind responsive controls </li></ul><ul><li>Lab illumination power-density 0.9 watt/SF 0.6 watt/SF w/LED task lighting </li></ul><ul><li>Fixtures near windows on daylight sensors No Yes </li></ul><ul><li>Energy Star freezers & refrigerators No Yes </li></ul><ul><li>Out-perform CA Title 24 20-25% 50% </li></ul>
    8. 8. Agenda <ul><li>Smart Lab Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation </li></ul><ul><li>Low Flow Fume Hoods </li></ul><ul><li>Exhaust System Optimization </li></ul><ul><li>Laboratory Smart Lighting Controls </li></ul><ul><li>Smart Lab Case Study: Gross Hall </li></ul>
    9. 10. CDCV & Energy $avings Monitor Air Contaminants <ul><li>Reduce air changes per hour (ACH) </li></ul><ul><li>if no contaminants detected </li></ul><ul><li>Increase air changes per hour (ACH) </li></ul><ul><li>when contaminants detected </li></ul>
    10. 11. Question: Is Increased ACH Safer? <ul><li>“ Specification of Airflow Rates in Laboratories” by Tom Smith, Exposure Control Technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ACH as a metric for dilution is “too simplistic” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Need to take into account other factors that lead to exposure, including contaminant generation rate, air mixing, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Increased airflow may increase contaminant generation and distribution throughout the space” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May lead to “false sense of safety” </li></ul></ul>
    11. 12. Answer: Not Necessarily <ul><li>Alternatives to simply increasing ACH: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Base air exchange rate on contaminant generation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Review lab practices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Attain proper air mix ratios </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce overall ACH to save energy and increase ACH as needed via “smart controls” </li></ul></ul>
    12. 13. CA Ventilation Code Requirements: <ul><li>Effective 1/2008 </li></ul><ul><li>Refers to ASHRAE 62.1-2004 </li></ul><ul><li>New construction </li></ul><ul><li>No category for university research labs </li></ul>B “Research” Labs: 0.43cfm/sf Therefore: 12 ft ceiling = 2.15 ACH 10 ft ceiling = 2.58 ACH 8 ft ceiling = 3.23 ACH B“Science Classroom”/L (H-8): 1 cfm/sf California Mechanical Code 2007 <ul><li>In effect through December 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Existing construction </li></ul>B Labs: 6 ACH H-8 Labs : 1 cfm/sf Therefore: 12 ft ceiling = 5 ACH 10 ft ceiling = 6 ACH 8 ft ceiling = 7.5 ACH California Building Code 2001 Comments Ventilation Requirements Code in Effect Need “Alternative Means of Protection” from CA State Fire Marshal for Less Than Minimum Required Ventilation
    13. 14. Agenda <ul><li>Smart Lab Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation </li></ul><ul><li>Low Flow Fume Hoods </li></ul><ul><li>Exhaust System Optimization </li></ul><ul><li>Laboratory Smart Lighting Controls </li></ul><ul><li>Smart Lab Case Study: Gross Hall </li></ul>
    14. 15. Low Flow (high performance) Fume Hoods Sash Airfoil Work Surface Exhaust Plenum Baffle Increased Hood Depth Operate safely at lower face velocities (i.e. 70 FPM rather than 100 FPM)
    15. 16. Benefits of Low Flow Fume Hoods – UCI Study 2008 <ul><li>Both traditional and low flow fume hoods UC Irvine subjected to 168 ASHRAE 110 tests </li></ul><ul><li>Low flow hoods performed better than standard hood at 80 & 100 fpm with fully open sash and at 18” open sash </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tracer gas results were well under 0.1ppm “as used” ASHRAE criteria </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low flow hoods save significant energy, particularly in constant volume systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low flow hoods may be a good solution in buildings with limited HVAC capacity </li></ul></ul>
    16. 17. Flow & Cost Comparison 325 CFM $1,625 331 CFM $1,655 343 CFM $1,715 VAV with Perfect Sash Management Flow at 70 fpm nominal face velocity Annual Cost at $5 per CFM Flow at 80 fpm nominal face velocity Annual Cost at $5 per CFM Flow at 100 fpm nominal face velocity Annual Cost at $5 per CFM HVAC System Type and Fume Hood Equipment 335 CFM $1,675 343 CFM $1,715 361 CFM $1,805 VAV with ASC Good: 462 CFM/$2310 Poor: 530 CFM/$2650 Good: 470 CFM/$2350 Poor: 539 CFM/$2695 Good: 492 CFM/$2460 Poor: 558 CFM/$2790 VAV with ZPS Good: 511 CFM/$2555 Poor: 604 CFM/$3020 Good: 568 CFM/$2840 Poor: 686 CFM/$3430 Good: 682 CFM/$3410 Poor: 851 CFM/$4255 Variable Air Volume (VAV) 630 CFM $3150 720 CFM $3600 900 CFM $4500 Constant Air Volume
    17. 18. Agenda <ul><li>Smart Lab Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation </li></ul><ul><li>Low Flow Fume Hoods </li></ul><ul><li>Exhaust System Optimization </li></ul><ul><li>Laboratory Smart Lighting Controls </li></ul><ul><li>Smart Lab Case Study: Gross Hall </li></ul>
    18. 19. Lab Building Exhaust Wind Exhaust Fan Bypass Damper Plenum Fume Hood Supply Fan Duct Balcony Re-Entrainment of Contaminated Air
    19. 20. Wind Tunnel Testing Challenge Conservative Assumptions
    20. 21. Wind Tunnel Testing <ul><li>Build model of campus </li></ul><ul><li>Install model stacks </li></ul><ul><li>An abundance of air sampling point receptors </li></ul>
    21. 22. Exhaust Energy Reduction Solutions Slightly higher stacks, 4-5 feet Variable speed fans (reduce exhaust fan flows) Install wind responsive equipment (if needed) Reduce or eliminate bypass air
    22. 23. Original Stack Height New Stack Height
    23. 24. Croul Hall <ul><li>Install variable frequency drives (VFD) </li></ul><ul><li>8’ Stack Extensions </li></ul><ul><li>Static Pressure Reset </li></ul><ul><li>Energy Savings: </li></ul><ul><li>344,000 kWh </li></ul>
    24. 25. Agenda <ul><li>Smart Lab Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation </li></ul><ul><li>Low Flow Fume Hoods </li></ul><ul><li>Exhaust System Optimization </li></ul><ul><li>Laboratory Smart Lighting Controls </li></ul><ul><li>Smart Lab Case Study: Gross Hall </li></ul>
    25. 26. Lighting Controls Reduce Power Density by 50% Lab Area LPD from 1.1 to 0.6 Lab Prep LPD from 1.0 to 0.4 Prep Room LPD from 2.0 to 1.0 Corridor LPD from 0.6 to 0.3
    26. 27. Lamp and Ballast <ul><li>Replace existing 32 watt T8 lamps with 25 watt T8 lamps </li></ul><ul><li>Replace existing NLO instant start ballast with RLO program start ballast </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In renovation projects, use reduced light output (RLO) electronic ballasts in building spaces lighted with fluorescent lamps where slightly lower light levels will suffice. RLO ballasts produce approximately 75% of rated light output and use 12% to 20% less power than standard NLO ballasts. </li></ul></ul>
    27. 28. Lower Blinds to Allow for Daylighting
    28. 29. Fixture Closest to the Window is OFF
    29. 30. Manual Switch to Occupancy Sensor 50% Auto On - Manual to 100% A-B CIRCUITING
    30. 31. Auto on to 50% Light Level
    31. 32. Gross Hall Perforated Blinds <ul><li>High performance glazing </li></ul><ul><li>Perforated blinds allow diffuse light to enter the space when closed </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced glare </li></ul><ul><li>Increased occupant control </li></ul>
    32. 33. Agenda <ul><li>Smart Lab Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation </li></ul><ul><li>Low Flow Fume Hoods </li></ul><ul><li>Exhaust System Optimization </li></ul><ul><li>Laboratory Smart Lighting Controls </li></ul><ul><li>Smart Lab Case Study: Gross Hall </li></ul>
    33. 34. Bill & Sue Gross Hall A Smart & Sustainable Design
    34. 35. Gross Hall Features <ul><li>Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation - real-time indoor air quality monitoring, varies the ventilation rate </li></ul><ul><li>Occupancy Based Controls - controls both ventilation system & lighting </li></ul><ul><li>Natural Ventilation - operable windows linked with mechanical ventilation </li></ul><ul><li>Smart Lighting Controls - daylighting sensors used with perforated blinds </li></ul><ul><li>Energy Star Equipment - freezers, refrigerators, ice machines & copiers </li></ul><ul><li>Air Handling System - larger components allow a low velocity system, reducing pressure drops throughout the system. </li></ul><ul><li>Building Exhaust - right sized exhaust system eliminates bypass air </li></ul>
    35. 36. Right Sized Air Handlers & Exhaust
    36. 37. Operable Windows Interlocked with HVAC System
    37. 38. Smart Lab “Safety Net” <ul><li>Phoenix Controls Celeris® Display Panels </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Currently in use at Gross Hall </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Programmed to display ACH, occupancy status and ventilation offset information within lab </li></ul></ul>
    38. 39. Smart Lab “Safety Net” <ul><li>Emergency General Ventilation Purge “Red Button” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fully opens general exhaust ventilation valves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Response within minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Integrated alarm system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deactivates when button is pulled out </li></ul></ul>
    39. 40. Smart Lab “Safety Net” <ul><li>Occupant Training </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Occupant welcome brochure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Red Button” signage </li></ul></ul>
    40. 41. <ul><li>Estimated annual energy savings: </li></ul><ul><li>890,080 kWh electrical with 193 kW demand reduction </li></ul><ul><li>22,464 therms of natural gas </li></ul><ul><li>Estimated annual energy cost savings: </li></ul><ul><li>$ 110,980 at $0.105/kWh and $0.78/therm </li></ul><ul><li>Savings by Design payment of $ 397,836 </li></ul><ul><li>Exceeding Title 24 by 50% </li></ul><ul><li>Bid as a LEED New Construction (NC) Silver </li></ul><ul><li>Design Build contractor proposed to increase the sustainable features to achieve LEED NC Gold certification </li></ul>
    41. 42. Smart Labs Considerations/Challenges <ul><li>Maintenance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mechanical Repairs to Phoenix system (poppets, valves, etc) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Software updates/adjustments to Johnson Controls </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sensor calibration/replacement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Calibration of sash sensors, zone presence sensors, etc. </li></ul></ul>
    42. 43. Smart Labs Considerations/Challenges <ul><li>Considerations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lack of “universal” CDCV sensor for all chemicals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CA requires variance from Cal/OSHA to allow use of low flow hoods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Risk Assessment of lab operations needed to select the appropriate smart controls </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Life cycle cost/payback analysis needed! </li></ul>
    43. 44. Questions?
    44. 45. Information Presented Today <ul><li>UC Irvine’s Smart Lab Retrofit Guide </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://slidesha.re/cXtEOz </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Smart Lab Buildings Presentation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http:// </li></ul></ul><ul><li>CDCV The Commissioning, Lab Safety, and Energy Savings Tool </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http:// </li></ul></ul>
    45. 46. Thank You!

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