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Overview of national data scanand presentation of research findings                   Action Planning DayDeans of Educatio...
MATSITI/ACDE Project (6 stages)1. ACDE/MATSITI meeting of Deans of Education (Sydney 16th   March 2012)2. Institutional sc...
Summary of scan data                         Percentage Indigenous students studying ITE              3.00%              2...
Indigenous ITE Students Completions (Australia Wide)700600500                                                       30% co...
Summary of Interview process/data• Total of 70 interviews from 20th June – present• Arranged by School/Faculty of Educatio...
Themes emerging from the dataNarrative 1: (Remote, block) GraceNarrative 2: (Urban, Mainstream) JulieNarrative 3: (Remote,...
What we can learn from GracePersonal and economic pressures can be partially alleviatedwith personal support from both Sch...
What we can learn from Julie?Mainstream Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students may be invisible to School/FacultyS...
What we can learn from Sissy?Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students often have triple thepressures on them compare...
What we can learn from Jack?Personal relationships often make the differenceFlexible pathways , exit and re-entry points c...
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MATSITI Teacher Education Research

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Overview of research findings into initial teacher education - retention and completion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

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MATSITI Teacher Education Research

  1. 1. Overview of national data scanand presentation of research findings Action Planning DayDeans of Education and Heads of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Centres Sydney 26 September 2012
  2. 2. MATSITI/ACDE Project (6 stages)1. ACDE/MATSITI meeting of Deans of Education (Sydney 16th March 2012)2. Institutional scans (both qualitative and quantitative across 34 institutions offering ITE)3. Literature Review4. State meetings with Faculty/Schools of Education and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Centre staff (QLD, Vic/Tas, SA/NT, WA & NSW)5. Interviews and data collection at key sites6. Institutional Action Planning (today)
  3. 3. Summary of scan data Percentage Indigenous students studying ITE 3.00% 2.50% 2.00% QLD Percentage NSW 1.50% Vic & Tas SA & NT WA 1.00% Australia 0.50% 0.00% 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Year
  4. 4. Indigenous ITE Students Completions (Australia Wide)700600500 30% completing their ITE courses (2007-2011)400 Commencing Course Completions300200100 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
  5. 5. Summary of Interview process/data• Total of 70 interviews from 20th June – present• Arranged by School/Faculty of Education, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Centre or combination of both + snowball referrals• Mainstream, Cohort & Residential/block• Urban, Regional, Remote• Selected on the basis of a significant number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander pre-service students or a distinctive program within a particular institution,(a summary of the findings from these interviews hasbeen distributed in the conference material)
  6. 6. Themes emerging from the dataNarrative 1: (Remote, block) GraceNarrative 2: (Urban, Mainstream) JulieNarrative 3: (Remote, block) SissyNarrative 4: (Urban, mainstream) Jack
  7. 7. What we can learn from GracePersonal and economic pressures can be partially alleviatedwith personal support from both School/Faculty and CentrePersonal relationships make the difference whether fromCentre or Faculty, ideally bothFlexibility often makes it possible for students to completeOnline study on its own can be a deterrent - but can bealleviated by personal contactAcademic needs should be addressed at criticalpoints, such as first year of study
  8. 8. What we can learn from Julie?Mainstream Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students may be invisible to School/FacultyScholarships need regular review and scholarship students need support from within School/FacultyIndigenous knowledges crucial for all students, but different issues arise; Indigenous students want to see more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander presenceCentres and ITAS tutors are often crucial to student support
  9. 9. What we can learn from Sissy?Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students often have triple thepressures on them compared to non-Indigenous mainstream studentsWithout flexibility students will drop out because of overloadField experience offices need to understand issues related to practicum:financial pressures, loaded responsibilities, racismWhen Schools/Faculties genuinely value cultural knowledge, studentsknow it and feel supportedTo improve support and graduation rates, especially from remotecommunities, language (both English and academic language) , literacyand numeracy needs should be supported initially and throughoutprogram
  10. 10. What we can learn from Jack?Personal relationships often make the differenceFlexible pathways , exit and re-entry points can allow studentsto return when ready and supportedRelationships between Schools/Faculties and Centres mayprovide timely supportMentoring makes a differenceSchools/Faculties can provide avenues for students to reflectand debrief on things such as racism

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