Planting seeds, growing futures our ancestors can walk in with our grandchildren

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Hine Waitere No Tuwharetoa, Kahungunu, Tuhoe me Tainui Building on Success
Director: Indigenous Leadership Centre
National Institute of Maori Education
Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi
MATSITI Teacher Education Forum, Adelaide, 3 July 2014

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Planting seeds, growing futures our ancestors can walk in with our grandchildren

  1. 1. Hine Waitere No Tuwharetoa, Kahungunu, Tuhoe me Tainui Building on Success Director: Indigenous Leadership Centre National Institute of Maori Education Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi hine.waitere@wananga.ac.nz Planting seeds, growing futures our ancestors can walk in with our grandchildren MATSITI NATSIATE Forum Adalaide 3-4 July 2014
  2. 2. • Developing “a culture of care not one of compliance”. • Building relationships with whānau, hapū and iwi to support data-driven improvements around leadership, teaching and learning Learning intention
  3. 3. Treaty of Waitangi Texts PrinciplesProvisions
  4. 4. Texts A focus on the actual words – this has led to debates about versions and translations
  5. 5. Provisions This focus has been on what and who the treaty provides for Rights and Responsibilities
  6. 6. Principles Relevance – making links between the TEXTS & PROVISIONS for Today
  7. 7. Treaty of Waitangi Texts A focus on the actual words - this has led to debates about translations Principles Relevance – making links between the TEXTS & PROVISIONS and Today Provisions This focus has been on what and who it provides for - Rights and Responsibilities
  8. 8. If culture is a qualifier … then we might ask …. a qualifier of WHAT?
  9. 9. Rangiatea
  10. 10. The vision of Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 is: ‘Māori enjoying and achieving education success as Māori’. The vision means: • ensuring that all Māori students, their parents and their whānau participate in and contribute to an engaging and enjoyable educational journey that recognises and celebrates their unique identity, language and culture. With the intended outcome that: • the journey will support Māori students to achieve the skills, knowledge and qualifications they need to achieve success in te ao Māori, New Zealand and in the wider world.
  11. 11. The strategic intent Māori enjoying education success as Māori
  12. 12. Attendance Retention Engagement Achievement
  13. 13. Ka Hikitia, the NZCF, the NEGS, NAGS, Teacher Standards, Secondary Principals Standards are not seeking a special response – but rather a professional (ethical) response. The aim of Building on Success is to support educational leaders, schools with whānau/hapu and iwi to identify and implement a localised response.
  14. 14. 2 Strong engagement and contribution from students and those who are best placed to support them – parents, families and whānau, hapu, iwi communities 1 Quality provision, leadership, teaching and learning supported by effective governance Language culture and Identity Ako Proactive Partnerships Maori potentialTreaty of Waitangi Maori student achievement as Maori The guiding principles & critical factors of Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success
  15. 15. Māori Potential Approach in education A traditional/inherited approach that focuses on… A contemporary Potential approach that focuses on… Remedying deficit Realising potential Problems of dysfunction Identifying opportunity Government intervention Investing in people and local solutions Targeting deficit Tailoring education to the learner Māori as a minority Indigeneity and distinctiveness Instructing and informing Collaborating and co-constructing
  16. 16. The scale of the task – Weighing the pig – evidence, darn evidence and what we do with it?
  17. 17. Source: OECD (200 Source: OECD (2001) Knowledge and skills for life, Appendix B1, Table 2.3a, p.253, Table 2.4, p.257 1) Knowledge and skills for life, Appendix B1, Table 2.3a, p.253, Table 2.4, p.257. Finland CanadaNew Zealand Australia Ireland Korea United Kingdom Japan SwedenBelgium Austria Iceland Norway United States Denmark Switzerland SpainCzech Republic Italy Germany HungaryPoland Greece Portugal Luxembourg Mexico 420 440 460 480 500 520 540 560 5075100125150 Variation expressed as percentage of average variation across the OECD Meanperformanceinreadingliteracy. r = 0.04 Low quality High equity Low quality Low equity High quality High equity High quality Low equity New Zealand’s Overall Performance High Average and Large Variance
  18. 18. Reading literacy proficiency levels PISA Country/ Group Mean Ranking New Zealand 521 7th Pakehā 541 2nd Asian 522 7th OECD average 493 Māori Slovenia, Slovakia 478 34th= Pacific Below Chile Above Mexico 448 44th
  19. 19. Reading Curve READING 0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00 25.00 30.00 100 - 150 151 - 200 201 - 250 251 - 300 301 - 350 351 - 400 401 - 450 451 - 500 501 - 550 551- 600 601 - 650 651 - 700 701 - 750 751 - 800 801 - 850 851 - 900 %ofstudents Maori Pasifika Pakeha Asian Hattie, J. (2007). Narrow the gap, fix the tail, or close the curves: The power of words: University of Auckland.
  20. 20. Mathematics Curve Hattie, J. (2007). Narrow the gap, fix the tail, or close the curves: The power of words: University of Auckland. MATHEMATICS 0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00 25.00 100 - 150 151 - 200 201 - 250 251 - 300 301 - 350 351 - 400 401 - 450 451 - 500 501 - 550 551- 600 601 - 650 651 - 700 701 - 750 751 - 800 801 - 850 851 - 900 900 - 950 %ofstudents Maori Pasifika Pakeha Asian
  21. 21. Retention of Maori Students from Years 9 to 11 within the Central North Region, 2008 Not attending school by the end of Year 11 40% Attending school by the end of Year 11 60%
  22. 22. Year 11 Maori Students Achieving the Literacy Requirement2008 (as a percentage of the original cohort) 60%of Original Cohort Remain at School 42%of Original Cohort Achieve Level 1 Literacy Credits
  23. 23. Year 11 Maori Students Achieving NCEA Level 1 2008 (as a percentage of the original cohort) 28% of Original Cohort Achieve NCEA L1 60% of Original Cohort Remain at School
  24. 24. Maori learners Likely experience 2011 At an individual Māori learner level, an analysis of current key system indicator data shows that for every 100 Māori children who start school in 2011, their experience is likely to be as follows: • 89 will have participated in early childhood education • 87 will go to school in the North Island • 60 will attend a decile 1-4 school • 17 will enter Māori Medium Education • 18 will not have achieved basic literacy and numeracy skills by age 10 • 5 will be stood-down from school • 1 will be suspended (Māori boys - 4 x more likely than others to face suspension) • 34 will leave secondary school without a qualification • At least 20 will be disengaged from education, employment or training by age 17. • 48 will leave school with NCEA Level 2 or better • 20 will leave school with a university entrance standard • 4 will progress to study at a bachelors degree or higher
  25. 25. The foundations for data use (Ronka, Geier & Marciniak, 2010) Data Quality Capacity Culture
  26. 26. Student Learning Demographic Perceptions School Processese.g., courses offered, class size policy, student-parent- teacher conferences, school profile, PD funding e.g., teacher observations of ability, unit assessments, PAT, NCEA, e-asTTle e.g., perceptions of learning environment, values and beliefs, attitudes e.g., gender, ethnicity, attendance, special needs, ESOL Are groups of students experiencing education differently? What is the relationship between perception and student outcomes? What difference are school processes making in student outcomes How does participation in various programmes differ by student subgroup groups? Adapted from Bernhardt, V. L. (2004) Data Analysis for continuous school
  27. 27. Data work • Establishment of evidential databases (EDBs) • Using historical and current data to set challenging (but attainable) individual and group academic achievement targets • Use of data for: – ongoing tracking and monitoring of student learning and progress – provision of regular academic review and counselling to monitor and support students’ progress towards their set targets – increased communication with parents/whānau/caregivers focusing on student learning and achievement - Building leadership capability with respect to equity and data literacy. - Building capability with respect to inquiry and problem solving. - Building system capability in evaluation.
  28. 28. Narrative Activity 10B Unit Ideas “Can we start with the basics? They come to school without bags 1, without books 2, without equipment 3, without pencils 4, without anything that can assist them in learning 5. That’s not just a few but a substantial number of our students. Not only Māori students but certainly Māori students. The first thing you notice is the lack of equipment when they turn up in the form room and accompanying that, often, a great big chip on the shoulder.” What do you mean by that? A lack of desire to learn – for some reason ‘agro’ between some Māori students and some teachers. Values! We don’t know them and they don’t know us, a barrier seems to come with them from somewhere and it’s already there when they walk in the door.”
  29. 29. Narrative Activity 10B Tally of Unit Ideas into Discursive Positions With Māori students and their home communities Within classroom relationships and interactions Within school institutions (systems and structures) ? ? ?
  30. 30. The Narratives of Experience from Culture Speaks • Students (engaged and non engaged Māori students) • Whānau • Principals • Teachers (Outside the school within Māori communities) (Within classrooms) (Outside the classroom but within the School or schooling)
  31. 31. Tally of discursive unit ideas showed Discourses Explaining Māori Achievement: Students, Whānau, Principals and Teachers 9% 18% 22% 61% 80% 63% 49% 20% 11% 19% 29% 19% 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Percentage Child Structure Relationship Student Whänau Principal Teachers © 2003 Ministry of Education
  32. 32. What does this look & sound like to Māori students? He’s not a good teacher He’s not exciting He’s boring, just the way he teaches us is boring Oh, she’s always nice to us with our marks and our reports, she says I’m going to be strict this report. Get our reports … Excellence, Excellence, Excellence. So do you think you’ve earned that excellence? I think I’d get a Non Achieved and she’s given me a Merit, it’s like, I didn’t deserve this. Who said he is a good teacher? He’s just good at teaching. Yeah he is all about teaching and not about actually connecting with the students. She’s dedicated to what we do in our class I think it’s just her passion, that she likes seeing kids achieving instead of failing Feels cool, that we’ve got someone who’s gonna help us get through school. Low implementer No No Caring implementer Yes No High implementer Yes Yes Learning implementer No Yes Teacher types Caring Learning
  33. 33. Any change/reform initiative must do the following: Goal: Focusing on improving target student’s participation and achievement Developing a new Pedagogy of Relations to depth Developing new Institutions and Structures Developing Leadership that is responsive and proactive Spreading the reform to include others Using Evidence to monitor the progress of the reform in the school Taking Ownership

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