Traffic Incident Management for MATC                Summer Institute                                2012                  ...
NDOR and NSP                 e   …                                    • 8 NDOR Districts                                  ...
Real Time System Management ….the capability to  monitor, in real-time,  the traffic and travel  conditions of the  major...
NDOR (and Partners) are AMBER Alerts        NSP       NDOR       Media        NET     Nebraska    Broadcasters       SECC ...
What is a is a traffic incident?                            Definition contained in                              MUTCD Par...
Incident Stages•   Detection•   Verification                   • Response sequencing is•   Response                       ...
What are Some Impacts of Traffic             Incidents?                                    •    Congestion                ...
Effects of an Incident             Secondary                    • For every minute a lane                                 ...
Why TIM Training?                                •    There are several public health and safety                          ...
Primary Function of TTC• The primary functions of TTC at a traffic incident  management area are to inform road users of t...
6 TIM Discipline Areas: Which Hat are You?1. Law enforcement2. Fire and rescue3. EMS4. Towing and recovery5. Transportatio...
What are primary core              competencies?Primary core competencies were defined as those shared orsimilar actions t...
What are secondary core                 competencies?• Secondary core competencies for each incident type weredefined as t...
Adult Learning Principals• Adult learning principles state that adults  learn more effectively when they can  understand t...
Iowa Volunteer Fireman KilledIowan killed directing cars on I-80A 41-year-old Minden, Iowa, man was hit by a    car and ki...
Rural Nebraska and Rural                     America• 23% of the USA  population live in rural  areas but rural crashes  a...
Reduced Mortality:                        Golden Hour        By reducing both notification and        response times, TIM ...
NDOR Intelligent            Transportation Systems                                                      Travelers         ...
NDOR is Weather Responsive Traffic                     ManagementWeather messages: The last decade has seengrowth in the a...
NDOR Road Weather Information        Systems (RWIS)• More than 70 RWIS  statewide• Nearly 50% of  traffic delay is  weathe...
NDOR Rural and Urban District                Operations Centers            Troop A           Dispatch        1.402.331.333...
Traffic Management Center Emergency Support Activities                        How your TMC can assist:                    ...
NDOR Road Closure Authority•   A road closure may result from any condition                  The Nebraska Department of Ro...
Traveler Information                   and Alternate Routing                       Motorist Information        Guidance6/1...
NDOR Motorist Information6/11/2012     MATC Summer Institute 2012   25
NDOR and Partners are                  CVISN6/11/2012         MATC Summer Institute 2012   26
What States Have the Most Freight?                  Why Does it Matter?6/11/2012              MATC Summer Institute 2012  ...
NDOR is Multi State Operations6/11/2012   MATC Summer Institute 2012   28
Fatal Incident Reconstruction Team                Reduces Investigation Time6/11/2012              MATC Summer Institute 2...
Facts About Secondary Crashes                                       •    The likelihood of a secondary crash increases by ...
What is Quick Clearance?                                   …the  practice of                                   rapidly and...
3 Safe, Quick Clearance Methods                           1. Driver Removal                              Quick Clearance  ...
The National Traffic Incident Management      Coalition’s National Unified Goal                                           ...
Feasibility, Flexibility, Interoperability and CollaborationThe only existing frameworkthat encompasses bothtransportation...
The Institutional Layer of TIM Framework•   The institutional layer considers the policies,    funding incentives, working...
The Traffic/Services Layer of the FrameworkTraffic / Services•   The Traffic/services layer is where    the emergency resp...
The Communications Layer of TIM FrameworkThe communications layerprovides for the accurateand timely exchange ofinformatio...
Rest in Peace• On September 18, 2011, a 41-year-old male volunteer fire fighter (the  victim) lost his life while directin...
Recommendation #1:• Fire departments should ensure that emergency responders receive proper training, and have adequate st...
Recommendation #2:Fire departments should ensure thatstandard operating guidelines includeguidance on identifying and main...
Recommendation #3:• Fire departments should establish pre-  incident plans and agreements regarding  traffic control incid...
Recommendation #4:Fire departments should ensure that high-visibility chevrons and reflective markingsare applied to all a...
Recommendation #5:Motorists should be attentive at all timeswhile operating a motor vehicle, especiallywhen approaching an...
Reduction of Capacity Under Incident                     Conditions                                             • A 2 lane...
Human factors: Total Stopping Sight Distance             (based on 2.5-sec Perception/Reaction Time) 60 Mph            65 ...
Stopping Sight DistanceThe distance traveled from the time a driverfirst detects the need to stop until the               ...
Human Factors Question• At night – How far away can a driver see you?6/11/2012                        MATC Summer Institut...
Section 6E.02 High-Visibility Safety                Flagger and High Visibility                                       Appa...
Common U.S. crash scene6/11/2012         MATC Summer Institute 2012   49
Typical European crash scene   EMS            PD                                               Fire/Rescue6/11/2012       ...
NFPA             Conduct initial size-up             Establish command             Identify hazards             Identify n...
NFPA             Operate and position vehicle in correct             manner.             Don’t            Create a        ...
On Scene Responders                                 •    On-scene responders should be trained                            ...
TIM Technology  Fatal Incident Reconstruction Team Partnership6/11/2012          MATC Summer Institute 2012   54
NFPA                        Operate and position vehicle in correct            Emergency-Vehicle Light                    ...
TTC Zones        NFPA    Assess effectiveness of TTC• Advance Warning     • First section that informs  Area report proble...
NFPAOperate and position vehicle in correctmanner.                   Minimize Lights                                      ...
Shadow Vehicles                                                     Shadow Vehicles –NFPA                                 ...
National Incident Management                 System                              • NIMS provides a                        ...
Responder Terminal and Enabling Learning Objectives                                      Enabling LearningTerminal Learnin...
Warning Signs - Placement• Right/Left-hand side of roadway• As near to the edge of the road as possible,  but no closer th...
NFPA            Assess effectiveness of TTC and report            problems through command structure            The test c...
We are sinking!! (2 minutes)6/11/2012            MATC Summer Institute 2012   63
The New NDOR TIM Resource Link                                     www.tim.ne.gov                                     www....
Thank you, MATC Summer                    Institute! Jim McGee 402-610-0074 Jim.McGee@Nebraska.gov6/11/2012          MATC ...
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Summer Institute 2012: Traffic Incident Management

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Mid-America Transportation Center
Summer Institute 2012
Presenter: Jim McGee, MPA, Nebraska Department of Roads

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Summer Institute 2012: Traffic Incident Management

  1. 1. Traffic Incident Management for MATC Summer Institute 2012 Jim McGee MPA NDOR Jim.McGee@nebraska.gov 402-610-00746/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 1
  2. 2. NDOR and NSP e … • 8 NDOR Districts • 4 NDOR Districts include Interstate-80 Corridor • 77,000 square miles • 10,000-mile state highway system • 450-mile I-80 Corridor • Iowa, Missouri0, South Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas are neighboring states • 6 NSP Troop Areas6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 2
  3. 3. Real Time System Management ….the capability to monitor, in real-time, the traffic and travel conditions of the major highways in the US and to share data with State and local governments and with the traveling public:1. Lane blocking events2. Road weather3. Construction4. Travel Time6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 3
  4. 4. NDOR (and Partners) are AMBER Alerts NSP NDOR Media NET Nebraska Broadcasters SECC Lottery6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 4
  5. 5. What is a is a traffic incident? Definition contained in MUTCD Part 6I: A traffic incident is an emergency road user occurrence, a natural disaster, or other unplanned event that affects or impedes normal flow of traffic.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 5
  6. 6. Incident Stages• Detection• Verification • Response sequencing is• Response dependent upon incident type and severity• Clearance • Response begins as a dispatch function• Recovery • Roles and responsibilities arise• Site management • Response sub-phases require continuing coordination,• Traffic management logistics and staging• Motorist information• After Action Review• Stages are not sequential!!• Response, clearance and site management can begin at once with proper agency coordination.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 6
  7. 7. What are Some Impacts of Traffic Incidents? • Congestion • Air quality • Secondary crashes • Responder “struck by” incidents • Clearance time • Commerce More than 70 • Shipping and freight towing and • Quality of Life recovery operators were killed in 2011!!6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 7
  8. 8. Effects of an Incident Secondary • For every minute a lane is blocked on freeway, Fatal Crash four minutes of congestion are created • Approximately 20% of all roadway crashes are Understand “secondary” crashes Traffic patterns 1 minute • 18% of all fatalities on blockage adds freeways are in four minutes of “secondary” crashes risk6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 8
  9. 9. Why TIM Training? • There are several public health and safety benefits. • For every minute that an Interstate lane is blocked because of a traffic incident, a 4- to5-minute travel delay can be expected to result (3). • Secondary crashes are often more severe • A strong interdisciplinary traffic incident management program can significantly decrease incident duration and, when combined with traveler information, can increase peak-period freeway speeds, reduce crash rates, and improve trip time reliability. • To realize this type of traffic incident management program, it is imperative to have a sound and effective training program for incident responders and managers.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 9
  10. 10. Primary Function of TTC• The primary functions of TTC at a traffic incident management area are to inform road users of the Inform road incident and to provide guidance information on the path toof users follow through the incident area.• Alerting road users and establishing a well incident Provide defined path to guide road users through the incident area will serve to protect the incident guidance on responders and those involved in working at the path to follow incident scene and will aid in moving road users expeditiously past or around the traffic incident, will reduce the likelihood of secondary traffic crashes, and will preclude unnecessary use of the surrounding local road system.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 10
  11. 11. 6 TIM Discipline Areas: Which Hat are You?1. Law enforcement2. Fire and rescue3. EMS4. Towing and recovery5. Transportation6. Notification and dispatch• PSAP• TMC• TOC6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 11
  12. 12. What are primary core competencies?Primary core competencies were defined as those shared orsimilar actions typically taken at each incident type by at leastthree on-scene responder groups.Every incident responder active in that incident managementphase—regardless of responder type—should know how toimplement these core competencies.For example, using emergency responder vehiclesto create a safe work area at the incident scene and wearingappropriate high-visibility protective apparel are primarycore competencies for all incident responders.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 12
  13. 13. What are secondary core competencies?• Secondary core competencies for each incident type weredefined as those actions that a specific responder group performsthat all other responder groups should understand andbe aware of. Every incident responder active in that phase ofresponse should be aware of these competencies because they areinterdependent.However, individual responders may not need to know how to actuallyimplement them. In addition to primary and secondary competencies, certain core discipline-specific competencies were included.• Discipline-specific competencies are those that only oneresponder group performs but are of such a critical naturethat it is necessary for all disciplines to be aware of their existenceand performance, such as hazardous materials (hazmat)cleanup.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 13
  14. 14. Adult Learning Principals• Adult learning principles state that adults learn more effectively when they can understand the intrinsic value of the materials being covered and are motivated to learn to the extent that they perceive that learning will help them perform tasks or is relevant in dealing with real-life situations .• Adult students gain new knowledge, understanding, skills, values, and attitudes most effectively when offered real-life or experience-oriented learning.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 14
  15. 15. Iowa Volunteer Fireman KilledIowan killed directing cars on I-80A 41-year-old Minden, Iowa, man was hit by a car and killed Sunday as he was directing traffic around an Interstate 80 accident near Shelby, Iowa, the Iowa State Patrol said.Michael Collins was pronounced dead at scene, the State Patrol said.The fatality was reported at 6:50 p.m.A 2001 Honda Accord driven by 43-year-old David Lee Thies of Ames, Iowa, entered an eastbound traffic lane that had been closed where a previous crash occurred, the Patrol said. The Iowa Department of Transportation reported already restricted lanes in the area because of bridge repair work.The accidents tied up eastbound I-80 traffic for hours Sunday evening. Part of the road reopened about 8:40 p.m., and full traffic was restored about two hours later.— Susan Szalewski6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 15
  16. 16. Rural Nebraska and Rural America• 23% of the USA population live in rural areas but rural crashes account for 55% of all traffic fatalities• 2-lane county roads are the most dangerous• Off-road• Young victims• 1-car• Delayed discovery 6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 16
  17. 17. Reduced Mortality: Golden Hour By reducing both notification and response times, TIM saves lives.•Mock Crash Response time has a Exercise well-documentedApril, 2012 relationship to likelihood of crash survival. Crash victims are 5-7 times more likely to die if arrival at • For seriously injured hospital exceeds 30 minutes patients, arrival at the hospital within the “golden hour” after the crash is considered a strong predictor of patient outcome.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 17
  18. 18. NDOR Intelligent Transportation Systems Travelers Centers Vehicles Roadside Wireless and Wire-line6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 18
  19. 19. NDOR is Weather Responsive Traffic ManagementWeather messages: The last decade has seengrowth in the amount and methods of gettingweather information to travelers.Dissemination strategies: Messages are posted onthe road and disseminated through traveler Motorist Informationinformation systems such as kiosks, websites, in-vehicle navigation systems, DMS, HAR, 511,cellular, and other portals.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 19
  20. 20. NDOR Road Weather Information Systems (RWIS)• More than 70 RWIS statewide• Nearly 50% of traffic delay is weather-related!• Nebraska’s 511 system was the first nationwide to deliver 30-mile surface weather reports6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 20
  21. 21. NDOR Rural and Urban District Operations Centers Troop A Dispatch 1.402.331.33336/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 21
  22. 22. Traffic Management Center Emergency Support Activities How your TMC can assist: • Detection • (tornadoes, •Planning for anticipated eventsVerification winter storms, etc.). • Response •Detection, verification and monitoring of roadway conditions. • damage and capacity. •Assessing transportation system Recovery • Site Management •Identification and management of public safety lifeline routes. •Traffic control strategies •to Traffic Management support emergency response and evacuation. •Management of detours•and evacuation routes. Motorist Information • After Action Review •Dispatch of maintenance and support vehicles. •Coordination with local transportation agencies. •Development of event-specific operational strategies to address response phases. •Warnings and public information/traveler alert requirements. •Stabilization of traffic demand in the affected area. •Post-event debriefings. 226/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012
  23. 23. NDOR Road Closure Authority• A road closure may result from any condition The Nebraska Department of Roads on or along the state highway system that retains statutory discretion to makes any given point along the road or route unsuitable for travel. determine when closing a state• The Nebraska Department of Roads retains highway is justified… statutory discretion to determine when closing a state highway is justified; and the Department makes all reasonable efforts to keep traffic on state maintained highways moving at all times.• At times, the Nebraska State Patrol may initiate road closures and will notify the NDOR Area Maintenance Superintendent or designee of the closure when that occurs. The NSP is then responsible for traffic control until NDOR personnel arrive. Jointly, NDOR and NSP determine the need for a detour route. When a closure occurs on the Interstate, the NSP may utilize the Department’s road closure gates for traffic control.• Reference: Nebraska Revised Statute 39-145 6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 23
  24. 24. Traveler Information and Alternate Routing Motorist Information Guidance6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 24
  25. 25. NDOR Motorist Information6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 25
  26. 26. NDOR and Partners are CVISN6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 26
  27. 27. What States Have the Most Freight? Why Does it Matter?6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 27
  28. 28. NDOR is Multi State Operations6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 28
  29. 29. Fatal Incident Reconstruction Team Reduces Investigation Time6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 29
  30. 30. Facts About Secondary Crashes • The likelihood of a secondary crash increases by 2.8 percent for each minute the primary incident continues to be a hazard. Secondary crashes are often more severe! • Causes include the dramatic change in traffic conditions, including the rapid spreading of queue length, and the substantial drop in traffic speed, as well as rubbernecking. • Secondary crashes due to congestion resulting from a previous crash are estimated to represent 20 percent of all crashes. • Incident management programs prevent secondary incidents by reducing the duration of traffic incidents, and by publicizing the incident using changeable message signs and traveler information systems. • – 13-20% of rush hour crashes are because of • congestion from previous incident • – Each traffic crash on a freeway increases the risk of secondary crash by 600%6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 30
  31. 31. What is Quick Clearance? …the practice of rapidly and safely removing temporary obstructions from the roadway. Transportation Research Board6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 31
  32. 32. 3 Safe, Quick Clearance Methods 1. Driver Removal Quick Clearance 2. Authority Removal Quick Clearance 3. Move Over/Slow Down Laws6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 32
  33. 33. The National Traffic Incident Management Coalition’s National Unified Goal 10. Multidisciplinary TIM Procedures 1. TIM Partnerships and 11. Response and Clearance Programs Time Goals 2. Multidisciplinary NIMS 12. 24X7 Availability and TIM Training 13. Multidisciplinary 3. Goals for Performance Communications Practices and Progress and Procedures 4. TIM Technology 14. Prompt, reliable responder 5. Effective TIM Policies notification 6. Awareness and 15. Interoperable voice and Education Partnerships data networks 7. Recommended Practices 16. Broadband emergency for Responder Safety communications systems 8. Move Over/Slow Down 17. Prompt, reliable traveler Laws information systems 9. Driver Training and 18. Partnerships with news Awareness media and information providers6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 33
  34. 34. Feasibility, Flexibility, Interoperability and CollaborationThe only existing frameworkthat encompasses bothtransportation and emergencymanagement communicationsis the National IntelligentTransportation Systems (ITS)Architecture.It provides three layers—institutional,traffic/transportation, andcommunications—in which tobuild any and all aspects ofTIM and is an establishedfoundation for TIMFramework.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 34
  35. 35. The Institutional Layer of TIM Framework• The institutional layer considers the policies, funding incentives, working arrangements, and jurisdictional structure that support the technical • The institutional layer layers of the architecture. The Institutional Layer provides the basis for understanding who the considers the policies, implementers of TIM will be and the roles these implementers could take in setting up TIM funding incentives,• programs. The institutional layer includes the institutions, working arrangements, policies, funding mechanisms, and processes that are required for effective implementation, and jurisdictional operation, and maintenance of an effective TIM Framework. structure that support• The institutional layer is shown as the base because solid institutional support and effective decisions the technical layers of are prerequisite to an effective TIM program. This is where the objectives and requirements for TIM are the architecture and is established. A host of actors from the public sector and the private sector make up the institutional the basis for layer. Within the realm of public sector investment, the relationships between the actors have become rather established. This is in large part because ITS understanding who the deployment decisions can be considered part and parcel of the larger transportation investment implementers are. decision-making process.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 35
  36. 36. The Traffic/Services Layer of the FrameworkTraffic / Services• The Traffic/services layer is where the emergency response and traffic solutions are defined in terms of the communications functions, the underlying functionality and data definitions that are required for each TIM service.• This layer, the heart of the National ITS Architecture, is referred to as “Transportation” in the National ITS Architecture.• As part of the TIM Framework, the layer is more focused on the traffic and emergency services portion of the National ITS Architecture, and it provides a framework for applying technology in a consistent, progressive, and effective fashion to improve the services in the traffic and emergency management system for surface highways.• The majority of the TIM Framework has a significant focus on this layer because TIM is service and operations oriented.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 36
  37. 37. The Communications Layer of TIM FrameworkThe communications layerprovides for the accurateand timely exchange ofinformation between TIMstakeholders and theirsystems to supporttraffic/service solutions.This layer is the heart ofcoordinatedmultidisciplinary incidentresponse.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 37
  38. 38. Rest in Peace• On September 18, 2011, a 41-year-old male volunteer fire fighter (the victim) lost his life while directing traffic at a motor vehicle collision on an interstate highway.• The victim responded to the scene in the departments rescue truck to establish a traffic incident management area (TIMA) while an ambulance crew from his department checked on vehicle occupants involved in the collision.• After establishing and repositioning the TIMA, the victim positioned himself in the left lane ahead of the TIMA to direct oncoming motorists to the right lane.• The victim was struck while standing on the left shoulder/left lane when a motorist swerved to the left from the right lane of travel to avoid hitting a vehicle in the right lane.• The victim was pronounced dead on the scene.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 38
  39. 39. Recommendation #1:• Fire departments should ensure that emergency responders receive proper training, and have adequate staffing, sufficient equipment, and appropriate procedures in place for responding to and operating at a roadway emergency incident. 6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 39
  40. 40. Recommendation #2:Fire departments should ensure thatstandard operating guidelines includeguidance on identifying and maintaining asafe location while working in or nearmoving traffic. 6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 40
  41. 41. Recommendation #3:• Fire departments should establish pre- incident plans and agreements regarding traffic control incident management at roadway incidents with other public safety agencies (e.g., fire departments, EMS, and law enforcement), local/state departments of highways, and private sector responders. 6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 41
  42. 42. Recommendation #4:Fire departments should ensure that high-visibility chevrons and reflective markingsare applied to all apparatus to enhanceconspicuity while parked at emergencyscenes and during emergency response. 6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 42
  43. 43. Recommendation #5:Motorists should be attentive at all timeswhile operating a motor vehicle, especiallywhen approaching and driving through atraffic incident management area, so thatthey avoid striking emergency responders,other vehicles, and/or traffic controldevices. 6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 43
  44. 44. Reduction of Capacity Under Incident Conditions • A 2 lane interstate highway facility has a reduction of 5% on the capacity with a simple vehicle stop on the Understand shoulder. • In a 2 lanes interstate Traffic patterns highway facility a shoulder accident causes a 20% reduction on capacity. • For a 3 lanes interstate More than just the single lane highway facility a one (1) that has been closed is impacted. lane blocked by an accident The greater the loss of highway or any event causes a 50% capacity, the greater the chances reduction on capacity. of a secondary crash.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 44
  45. 45. Human factors: Total Stopping Sight Distance (based on 2.5-sec Perception/Reaction Time) 60 Mph 65 Mph 70 Mph Understand Traffic patterns and Human Factors Note: Commercial vehicles require much longer distances.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 45
  46. 46. Stopping Sight DistanceThe distance traveled from the time a driverfirst detects the need to stop until the Understandvehicle actually stops Traffic patterns and Human Factors6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 46
  47. 47. Human Factors Question• At night – How far away can a driver see you?6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 47 Source: ANSI/ISEA 107-1999 MADE EASY. A Quick Reference to High-Visibility Safety Apparel
  48. 48. Section 6E.02 High-Visibility Safety Flagger and High Visibility Apparel Standard: • 01 For daytime and nighttime activity, flaggers shall wear high-visibility safety apparel that meets the Performance Class 2 or 3 requirements of the ANSI/ISEA 107– High Visibility 2004 publication entitled "American National Standard for High- Background Visibility Apparel and Headwear" Material Minimum (see Section 1A.11) and labeled as 450 in2Retro reflective/Combined- meeting the ANSI 107-2004 standard Performance Material performance for Class 2 or 3 risk Minimum Width 1.97 in Minimum Area 201 in2 exposure. The apparel background (outer) material color shall beThe Vest shall have contiguous fluorescent orange-red, fluorescent areas of retro reflective or combined-performance yellow-green, or a combination of thematerial encircling the torso – two as defined in the ANSI standard.placed in a manner to provide 3600 visibility The retroreflective material shall be orange, yellow, white, silver, yellow- TIM for Responders/ Fire School McGee 2012 green, or a fluorescent version of these colors, and shall be visible at a minimum distance of 1,000 feet. The retroreflective safety apparel shall be designed to clearly identify the wearer as a person. 6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 48
  49. 49. Common U.S. crash scene6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 49
  50. 50. Typical European crash scene EMS PD Fire/Rescue6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 50
  51. 51. NFPA Conduct initial size-up Establish command Identify hazards Identify needed resources Communicate to responders and dispatchers both orally and using communication devices Don protective equipment Operate and position vehicle in correct manner … the shortcoming of wearing NO Vest!6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 51
  52. 52. NFPA Operate and position vehicle in correct manner. Don’t Create a ‘Split Scene’6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 52
  53. 53. On Scene Responders • On-scene responders should be trained both in safe practices for accomplishing their tasks in and near traffic and the requirements for traffic incident management contained in this Manual. • Responders should always be aware of their visibility to oncoming traffic and take measures to move the traffic incident as far off the traveled roadway as possible or to provide for appropriate warning. • Emergency vehicles should be Safe- Positioned in such a manner as to optimize traffic flow through the incident scene. • All subsequent arriving emergency vehicles should be positioned as to not interfere with the established temporary traffic flow.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 53
  54. 54. TIM Technology Fatal Incident Reconstruction Team Partnership6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 54
  55. 55. NFPA Operate and position vehicle in correct Emergency-Vehicle Light manner. In multi-lane freeways Correct Recommended to ‘shed’ or turn off all forward facing emergency lighting that affect traffic in the oncoming lanes To reduce rubbernecking and prevents secondary crashes Light discipline considers human factors6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 55
  56. 56. TTC Zones NFPA Assess effectiveness of TTC• Advance Warning • First section that informs Area report problems throughthe incident and drivers about command structurearea they are approaching• Transition Area • Vary from a single sign or• Activity Area warning light on a vehicle to a series of warning• Termination Area signs How far upstream should – Examples: cones, flares, or advance emergency vehicles far in warning area advance of the actual be? incident (crash or fire scene) MATC Summer Institute 20126/11/2012 56
  57. 57. NFPAOperate and position vehicle in correctmanner. Minimize Lights Avoid glare to motorists Incorrect Turn off unnecessary lights Emergency vehicle lighting: Provides warning only and provides no effective traffic control Can be confusing and Understand Traffic drivers distracting to patterns and Human Factors Use amber instead of red6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 57
  58. 58. Shadow Vehicles Shadow Vehicles –NFPA Trucks or trailers thatOperate and position vehicle in correct are used to protectmanner. workers or work equipment from errant vehicles Heavy Vehicle – 33,000 GVWR or greater, loaded at least 20,000 pounds (tanker truck) 6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 58
  59. 59. National Incident Management System • NIMS provides a systematic, proactive approach guiding Reduce confusion government agencies at all Improve the safety of levels, the private sector responders and NGOs to work Make operations at the seamlessly to prepare for, prevent,more efficientrecover scene respond to, from and mitigate the effects of incidents regardless of cause, size, location, or complexity in order to reduce the loss of life or property and harm to the environment.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 59
  60. 60. Responder Terminal and Enabling Learning Objectives Enabling LearningTerminal Learning Objective Objective •• Summarize how to Recall the importance of ICS • Summarize the importance of prioritizing incident objectives use the ICS system • Discuss how to plan for physical organization of the scene and describe the to establish an need for diversion routes or diversion areas • Describe how to develop a plan for SQC organized incident • Describe how to designate the staging area location for additional resources, responders scene with • or both Discuss the communication that should effective scene occur with command, public information, and dispatch regarding staging area; communications additional services; contact with trucking companies; incident updates; revised duration; TTC devices; and lane closings and openings6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 60
  61. 61. Warning Signs - Placement• Right/Left-hand side of roadway• As near to the edge of the road as possible, but no closer than 2 feet• Right angles, facing traffic• No obstructions• In advance of hills and curves6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 61
  62. 62. NFPA Assess effectiveness of TTC and report problems through command structure The test concerning adequate lengths of tapers involves observation of driver performance after TTC plans are put into effect. Incorrect Correct Placement Placement6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 62 Source: Emergency Traffic Accommodation – A Guide for First Responders
  63. 63. We are sinking!! (2 minutes)6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 63
  64. 64. The New NDOR TIM Resource Link www.tim.ne.gov www.tim.nebraska.gov www.roads.ne.gov/TIM/ Includes material from FHWA, NTIMC, TIM Network, Traffic Forum, State DOT TIM programs and more.6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 64
  65. 65. Thank you, MATC Summer Institute! Jim McGee 402-610-0074 Jim.McGee@Nebraska.gov6/11/2012 MATC Summer Institute 2012 65

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