MR Strategy RecycleAwayZeroWaste

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  • 50% Diversion by 2000 State Mandate with penalties (CA increased diversion from 10% in 1990 to > 50% in 2005)75% Landfill Diversion by 2010 SF Goal (Achieved 72% diversion for 2007, including C&D)Zero Waste to landfill or incineration by 2020 SF Goal2009 Passed Styrofoam & Plastic Bag Bans and Mandatory C&D, Recycling and Composting Participation
  • 50% Diversion by 2000 State Mandate with penalties (CA increased diversion from 10% in 1990 to > 50% in 2005)75% Landfill Diversion by 2010 SF Goal (Achieved 72% diversion for 2007, including C&D)Zero Waste to landfill or incineration by 2020 SF Goal2009 Passed Styrofoam & Plastic Bag Bans and Mandatory C&D, Recycling and Composting Participation
  • 50% Diversion by 2000 State Mandate with penalties (CA increased diversion from 10% in 1990 to > 50% in 2005)75% Landfill Diversion by 2010 SF Goal (Achieved 72% diversion for 2007, including C&D)Zero Waste to landfill or incineration by 2020 SF Goal2009 Passed Styrofoam & Plastic Bag Bans and Mandatory C&D, Recycling and Composting Participation
  • 50% Diversion by 2000 State Mandate with penalties (CA increased diversion from 10% in 1990 to > 50% in 2005)75% Landfill Diversion by 2010 SF Goal (Achieved 72% diversion for 2007, including C&D)Zero Waste to landfill or incineration by 2020 SF Goal2009 Passed Styrofoam & Plastic Bag Bans and Mandatory C&D, Recycling and Composting Participation
  • 50% Diversion by 2000 State Mandate with penalties (CA increased diversion from 10% in 1990 to > 50% in 2005)75% Landfill Diversion by 2010 SF Goal (Achieved 72% diversion for 2007, including C&D)Zero Waste to landfill or incineration by 2020 SF Goal2009 Passed Styrofoam & Plastic Bag Bans and Mandatory C&D, Recycling and Composting Participation
  • 50% Diversion by 2000 State Mandate with penalties (CA increased diversion from 10% in 1990 to > 50% in 2005)75% Landfill Diversion by 2010 SF Goal (Achieved 72% diversion for 2007, including C&D)Zero Waste to landfill or incineration by 2020 SF Goal2009 Passed Styrofoam & Plastic Bag Bans and Mandatory C&D, Recycling and Composting Participation
  • 50% Diversion by 2000 State Mandate with penalties (CA increased diversion from 10% in 1990 to > 50% in 2005)75% Landfill Diversion by 2010 SF Goal (Achieved 72% diversion for 2007, including C&D)Zero Waste to landfill or incineration by 2020 SF Goal2009 Passed Styrofoam & Plastic Bag Bans and Mandatory C&D, Recycling and Composting Participation
  • MR Strategy RecycleAwayZeroWaste

    1. 1. WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE? REACHING ZERO WASTE Michael Alexander, President MASSRecycles Conference March 27, 2012
    2. 2. What Zero Waste is not• It is not “integrated” solid waste management• It is not about getting to zero• It does not accept current waste‐to‐energy technologies• It does not accept current landfilling practices
    3. 3. What Zero Waste is• It is a “total commitment” to pursue zero• It is about being on a path to zero
    4. 4. Zero Waste on the Agenda • White House Special Council on Recycling • London Times • National Public Radio (NPR) • Newsweek • Italy, New Zealand, England, France, Romania, American Samoa, Wales and Saipan • China sets 70% diversion Source: EcoCycle Data from: Waste Business Journal 2010 April 14, 2008
    5. 5. Zero Waste on the Agenda • White House Special Council on Recycling • London Times • National Public Radio (NPR) • Newsweek • Italy, New Zealand, England, France, Romania, American Samoa, Wales and Saipan • China sets 70% diversion Source: EcoCycle April 14, 2008 Data from: Waste Business Journal 2010
    6. 6. The Story of Stuff
    7. 7. The Story of Stuff
    8. 8. The Story of StuffIt’s the same old story…
    9. 9. The Zero Waste Cycle
    10. 10. America – the world’s most affluent… Waste Stream 34% Recycling Rate
    11. 11. The “Developing” World… 80%+ Recycling Rate
    12. 12. Materials Management Diamond Materials/Generators Always Recycled by Industry Management Technologies pre-consumer materials, No Government Involvement scraps yard, steel & scrap metal, printer scrap 10% paper millsbottles, cans , newspapers, Currently Recycled Through standard curbside bins, & yard waste from homes Municipal Curbside/Drop-off Programs no automated collection 15% recyclables from Currently Economic to Recycle larger single stream non-participating But Not Recovered bins, automated collection homes, businesses, and 25% vehicles , business systems public spaces Potentially Economic to Recycle, food scraps, textiles, But No Current Recovery grinders, land C&D debris Infrastructure or Local Markets spreaders, anaerobic 25% digesters, multi-material/composite Currently Not Economic to Recycle Next generation of conversion packaging & products technologies 15%personal hygiene products Never Economic landfilling & highly contaminated to Recycle materials 10%
    13. 13. Materials Management Diamond Always Recycled by Industry No Government Involvement 10%Materials/Generators Management Technologies Currently Recycled Through Municipal Curbside/Drop-off Programs 15% recyclables from Currently Economic to Recycle larger single stream non-participating But Not Recovered bins, automated collectionhomes, businesses, and 25% vehicles , business systems public spaces Potentially Economic to Recycle, food scraps, textiles, But No Current Recovery grinders, land C&D debris Infrastructure or Local Markets spreaders, anaerobic 25% digesters, Currently Not Economic to Recycle 15% Never Economic to Recycle 10%
    14. 14. State Strategies to Maximize Recycling• Establish Aggressive Goals• Enact Disposal Bans• Expand Bottle Bills• Build Local Recycling Capacity Building• Modernize the Infrastructure• Introduce Product Stewardship Legislation• Expand Market Development• Provide Local Government Funding
    15. 15. Communities on the Front-Lines ofthe Zero Waste Movement• Austin, TX • Oakland, CA• Alaminos City, Philippines • Santa Cruz County, CA• Canberra, Australia • Berkeley, CA• New Zealand – with over 66% • Palo Alto, CA of NZ Cities • Marin County• Buenos Aires, Argentina • Los Angeles, CA• Seattle, WA • Chicago, IL• Boulder, CO • Halifax, Nova Scotia• Central Vermont Waste Mgt. • Toronto, Ontario District, VT • Nelson, British Columbia and• San Luis Obispo, CA other Regional Districts• Fresno, CA• San Francisco, CA• Del Norte County CA Source: www.zwia.org
    16. 16. San Francisco’s Waste Diversion & Zero Waste Goals 1990 10%Diversion
    17. 17. San Francisco’s Waste Diversion & Zero Waste Goals1990 2000 CA State Mandate with Penalties
    18. 18. San Francisco’s Waste Diversion & Zero Waste Goals1990 2000 2005 >50% Diversion
    19. 19. San Francisco’s Waste Diversion & Zero Waste Goals1990 2000 2005 2007 >72% Diversion (Including C&D)
    20. 20. San Francisco’s Waste Diversion & Zero Waste Goals1990 2000 2005 2007 2009 - Ban on Styrofoam & Plastic Bags - Mandatory Participation in Recycling, C&D, & Composting
    21. 21. San Francisco’s Waste Diversion & Zero Waste Goals1990 2000 2005 2007 2009 2010 Goal 75% Landfill Diversion
    22. 22. San Francisco’s Waste Diversion & Zero Waste Goals1990 2000 2005 2007 2009 2010
    23. 23. 3 Stream Collection Programs forResidents and Businesses
    24. 24. Easy to UnderstandProgram and Outreach
    25. 25. Food Service/Event Signage
    26. 26. Recycle Away’s Fantastic ThreeRecycling System for University of San Francisco
    27. 27. Recycle Away’s Fantastic ThreeRecycling System for University of San Francisco
    28. 28. Catchy Slogans to Brand Program
    29. 29. Recology’s Jepsen Prairie OrganicsRegional Composting Facility Courtesy of City of San Francisco
    30. 30. SF Mandatory Recycling andComposting OrdinanceEffective October 21, 2009:• Everybody (residential and commercial) must separate recyclables, compostables (food waste, organic material, etc.) and trash into designated containers Hmmmmm, does that That would be a, include “YES!” me???
    31. 31. SF Mandatory Recycling andComposting OrdinanceEffective October 21, 2009:• Everybody (residential and commercial) must separate recyclables, compostables (food waste, organic material, etc.) and trash into designated containers• Property managers must provide program for tenants, contractors/janitors with appropriate color- coded containers, signage and education/training
    32. 32. SF Mandatory Recycling andComposting OrdinanceEffective October 21, 2009:• Everybody (residential and commercial) must separate recyclables, compostables (food waste, organic material, etc.) and trash into designated containers• Property managers must provide program for tenants, contractors/janitors with appropriate color-coded containers, signage and education/training• Potential fines up to $100 for residents, $1,000 for businesses
    33. 33. SF Mandatory Recycling andComposting OrdinanceEffective October 21, 2009:• Everybody (residential and commercial) must separate recyclables, compostables (food waste, organic material, etc.) and trash into designated containers• Property managers must provide program for tenants, contractors/janitors with appropriate color-coded containers, signage and education/training• Potential fines up to $100 for residents, $1000 for businesses• Pressure from ordinance has resulted in 15% increase composting tonnage to nearly 500 tpd and doubling of new composting participation requests
    34. 34. Lessons & Recommendationsfrom San Francisco• Provide convenient, color coded and easy to use collection programs• Conduct extensive outreach and on-site assistance to commercial & multi-tenant customers• Mandate participation with threat of fines• Improve technologies to reduce environmental impacts and improve/diversify products (i.e. biodiesel or anaerobic digestion)• Pursue Extended Producer Responsibility policies
    35. 35. Zero Waste Businesses areLeading the WayBusinesses with >90% Waste Diversion:• Anheuser-Busch, Fairfield, CA • NUMMI, Fremont, CA• Apple Computer, Elk Grove, CA • Pillsbury• Del Mar Fairgrounds • Playa Vista, LA, CA• Fetzer Vineyards • Ricoh Electronics, Inc• Frankie’s Bohemian Café, SF • San Diego Wild Animal Park• Greens Restaurant, SF • Scoma’s Restaurant, SF• Hewlett-Packard, Roseville, CA • Vons-Safeway• Mad River Brewery • Xerox Corp• New Belgium Brewery, Fort • Yost Printer, Monrovia, CA Collins, CO Presented at the Zero in on Zero Business Conference Source: www.grrn.org
    36. 36. Potential Revenues from Recycling in Expanded Bottle Bill States (e.g. NY/CT) # of Containers Revenues GeneratedPer Day Week Month Year $/Day $/week $/month $/year 1,000 7,000 29,400 264,600 $50 $350 $1,470 $13,230 2,000 10,000 42,000 378,000 $100 $500 $2,100 $18,900 3,000 15,000 63,000 567,000 $150 $750 $3,150 $28,350 4,000 20,000 84,000 756,000 $200 $1,000 $4,200 $37,800 5,000 25,000 105,000 945,000 $250 $1,250 $5,250 $47,250
    37. 37. Michael Alexander, President Recycle Away Brattleboro, VT 05302 1-800-664-5340 c) 802-579-7432Michael@RecycleAway.com www.RecycleAway.com

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