Massachusetts Water Resources AuthorityMassRecycle R3 Recycling & Organics ConferenceOrganics Recycling ThroughResiduals T...
2MWRA Service Area• MWRA provides wholesale water and wastewater services to over 2.5 millioncustomers in 61 communities (...
3An Environmental Success Story• In 2001, $3.8 billion Boston Harbor Project was completed• Second largest wastewater trea...
Recycling ResidualsDeer Island Treatment Plant: Removes 94+% solids & organics from WWEnd Result: Class A Fertilizer & Ren...
Treatment Processes
Deer Island Treatment Plant – Residuals Processing
7Residuals Processing Statistics for Deer Island• Sludge to Digestion – 246 dry TPD– 70% as Primary sludge – from gravity ...
8Residuals Processing Statistics for Deer Island (cont.)• Sludge to Pellet Plant – 106 dry TPD– On DITP, Digested sludge i...
9Residuals Processing Statistics for Deer Island (cont.)• FY12 Annual Avg digester gas production – 189.5 kscfh– 97.3% of ...
10Massachusetts Water Resources AuthorityPart of MWRA’s Long-Range Residuals Planning(DITP operation now 18 yrs old)• Goal...
11Co-Digestion Feasibility Study• Co-Digestion: the introduction of non-wastewater derived organic wastematerial into the ...
12Co-Digestion Feasibility Study• MaDEP Regulation:– Promulgated newly reformed regulations in late 2012 to pave way to tu...
13Co-Digestion Feasibility Study• MWRA Benefits:– Increased Digester Gas for increased Green Energy Production– Decrease p...
14Co-Digestion Feasibility Study• Digas System Capacity Analysis (complete)• MWRA Contract 7274A Task Order #6 with FST• D...
15Summary and Future Efforts• Deer Island already recycles a huge quantity or organics through its treatmentprocesses• Dig...
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Organics Recycling Through Residuals Treatment at MWRA’s Deer Island Treatment Plant

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Organics Workshop- Mixed Organics Streams as Feedstock and Products, Dave Duest from the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority shares demonstrates how the Deer Island Treatment Plant processes organics into renewable fuel for energy recovery.

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Organics Recycling Through Residuals Treatment at MWRA’s Deer Island Treatment Plant

  1. 1. Massachusetts Water Resources AuthorityMassRecycle R3 Recycling & Organics ConferenceOrganics Recycling ThroughResiduals Treatment atMWRA’s Deer Island Treatment PlantDavid DuestManager, Deer Island Process Control
  2. 2. 2MWRA Service Area• MWRA provides wholesale water and wastewater services to over 2.5 millioncustomers in 61 communities (34% of Mass. Population)• On average, MWRA delivers 200 million gallons per day to its water customers• MWRA collects and treats an average of 365 million gallons of wastewater perday
  3. 3. 3An Environmental Success Story• In 2001, $3.8 billion Boston Harbor Project was completed• Second largest wastewater treatment plant in the country• Average flow of 365 million gallons/day – peak capacity 1.3 billion gallons/day• Treated wastewater is discharged 9.5 miles out into >100 ft waters of Mass. Bay– Effective dilution 75-350x
  4. 4. Recycling ResidualsDeer Island Treatment Plant: Removes 94+% solids & organics from WWEnd Result: Class A Fertilizer & Renewable Fuel for Energy Recovery
  5. 5. Treatment Processes
  6. 6. Deer Island Treatment Plant – Residuals Processing
  7. 7. 7Residuals Processing Statistics for Deer Island• Sludge to Digestion – 246 dry TPD– 70% as Primary sludge – from gravity thickening– 30% as Waste Secondary sludge – from centrifuge thickening• Typical sludge makeup of other plants: 50:50– Time in Anaerobic Digestion:• 18 days avg.– 62% Volatile Solids destruction• (industry avg. is 45-55%)
  8. 8. 8Residuals Processing Statistics for Deer Island (cont.)• Sludge to Pellet Plant – 106 dry TPD– On DITP, Digested sludge is stored, then pumped 7 miles to Pellet Plant• Methane gas captured, stored, then used in boilers on site– Pellet Plant dewaters, dries, & pelletizes all digested sludge– All pellets go to beneficial re-use:• turf farms• golf courses• fertilizer blenders• cement kiln– Pellet rating as a slow releasefertilizer: 4-3-0
  9. 9. 9Residuals Processing Statistics for Deer Island (cont.)• FY12 Annual Avg digester gas production – 189.5 kscfh– 97.3% of gas is beneficially used in boilers– 76% of days that digester gas met all DI heating requirements– 98.4% of total boiler heat attributable to Digas• FY12 value of gas utilization - $15-20M (heat) & $2.8M (power)
  10. 10. 10Massachusetts Water Resources AuthorityPart of MWRA’s Long-Range Residuals Planning(DITP operation now 18 yrs old)• Goals:– Extend useful life of existing facilities– Improve process efficiency, optimize existing facility– Recommend long-term residual processes– Increase Digas volumes and increase green energy production,– Reduce sludge volumes• Evaluate MWRA Residuals Facilities & Processes– Deer Island & remote pelletizing plant in Quincy– Assess and Rank Technology Options– Develop “Short-List” of Most Viable Options– Perform Co-Digestion Feasibility Study
  11. 11. 11Co-Digestion Feasibility Study• Co-Digestion: the introduction of non-wastewater derived organic wastematerial into the wastewater anaerobic digestion process• Organic waste material:– Source Separate Organic Food Wastes (“SSO”)– Fats, Oils & Grease– Other materials –• airport deicing fluids,• off-spec beverages(dairy, brewery, soda bottling)
  12. 12. 12Co-Digestion Feasibility Study• MaDEP Regulation:– Promulgated newly reformed regulations in late 2012 to pave way to turnorganic wastes to green fuel• 310 CMR 16.00, Regulations for Solid Waste Management Facility SiteAssignment and Recycling, Composting & Conversion Permits• 310 CMR 19.00, Solid Waste Management• 314 CMR 12.00, Operation and Maintenance and Pretreatment Standards forWastewater Treatment Works and Indirect Dischargers– Summer 2014 ban on source separated organics to landfill forcommercial/industrial sources > 1 wet ton per week• Ban encourages diversion to AD units with digas recovery– MWRA under no regulatory obligation to accept this waste
  13. 13. 13Co-Digestion Feasibility Study• MWRA Benefits:– Increased Digester Gas for increased Green Energy Production– Decrease purchase of electricity• MWRA Impacts:– Need facilities on DITP to receive, store & feed material to digester– Increase sludge to Pellet Plant, $ (digestion is never 100% destruction)– Additional CHP facilities may be needed to handle increased gas productionif significant volumes are accepted
  14. 14. 14Co-Digestion Feasibility Study• Digas System Capacity Analysis (complete)• MWRA Contract 7274A Task Order #6 with FST• Determine bottlenecks in existing Digas Utilization Processes• Co-Digestion Bench Scale Study (expect completion Summer 2013)• MWRA Contract 7274A Task Order #7 with FST/UMass• Refine performance parameters to improve cost analysis• Co-Digestion Feasibility Study (draft report complete, under review)• MWRA Contract 7147A Subtask 7, CDM-Smith• Evaluate overall Co-Digestion Feasibility & Costs• Co-Digestion 1 Digester Scale Pilot (future, dependent on bench scale)• Further refine performance parameters and operational impacts• RFP to solicit vendors for small-scale pilot at Deer Island• Learn from others
  15. 15. 15Summary and Future Efforts• Deer Island already recycles a huge quantity or organics through its treatmentprocesses• Digester gas is a high-value green energy source at DITP• Co-Digestion could substantially increase digas production & electricitygeneration on DITP– Costs need to be clearly identified to plan cost mitigation– Co-Digestion could be a viable future treatment enhancement

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