Implementing the Organics Waste Ban at the SEMASS RRF

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Organics workshop- Implementing the Waste Ban: Daniel Peters from Covanta Energy shares the SEMASS RRF experience in adhering to the waste ban.

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Implementing the Organics Waste Ban at the SEMASS RRF

  1. 1. Implementing the Organics WasteBan at the SEMASS RRFMassRecycle R3 Conference – March 19, 2013
  2. 2. Quick Facts about the SEMASS RRF• 3,000 tpd EfW -Rochester, MA• Operating since1989• 80 MW Clean,Renewable Power(75,000 houses)March 2013 2• Big Role in 4th R: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle,Recover Energy from Waste
  3. 3. 3rd “R” Efforts:Recycling• Metal Recycling-~ 35,000 tpy• Recycling /SMRP GrantContributions:$2.8 million-to-date(Class II RECs).March 2013 3-5,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,00035,00040,00045,00050,0002003200420052006200720082009201020112012ReclaimedMetals(Tons)YearSEMASS Ferrous & Non-Ferrous RecyclingNon-FerrousFerrous$1,329$528$934$-$500$1,000$1,5002010 2011 2012ContributionCalendar YearCovanta SEMASS SMRP Grant Contribution
  4. 4. Organics Opportunity in SEMASS MSW• 2010 SEMASSWasteCharacterizationStudy - Organics:– 21.3% Overall• Lesser % in “ICI”category (Ban)• Higher % inresidentialMarch 2013 4
  5. 5. Organic Waste (21.3%) Characterization• Food Waste (14.4%)• Prunings / Trimmings / Leaves & Grass (2.7%) < 1” diameter• Branches & Stumps (1.9%) > 1” diameter• Remainder: Composite/ Organic (1.8%)• Manures (0.5%)March 2013 5
  6. 6. Organics Waste Ban -- Challenges• Safety is #1– Tipping Floor Hazards– DO NOT open bags !• Can Organics beIdentified?– Brush/leaves: Likely– Food Waste: Not sure• Is it Banned or Not ?• Failed Load Letters toHaulers/Customers– WB Fatigue?– Letter Fatigue• Is the WB processreaching Generators?– Are they Aware?– Do they Care?March 2013 6
  7. 7. Tip Floor Safety #1 PriorityLoaders vs. Personnel –Personnel “lose”~200 Trucks per Day;20-ft MSW piles typicalMarch 2013 76-ft20-ft
  8. 8. Tip Floor Safety:DO NOT Open Bagsfor WB InspectionsMarch 2013 8• Even “safety” Razorknives are hazardous– Slippery floor conditions– Heat & Cold stresses• Bag Content hazards• All other hazards(loaders, trucks, piles)
  9. 9. SEMASS Tip Floor - ID “Organics” Waste• ~5,500tons MSW• Should be~1,100tons oforganicwaste• High % ofloadspresentMarch 2013 9
  10. 10. A CloserView….Can you seetheOrganics orFood Wastenow?10
  11. 11. March 2013 11Highest% equalto HighestVisibilityof the WBMaterialMostVisible“Organic”category
  12. 12. March 2013 12Highest% equalto HighestVisibilityof the WBMaterialMostVisible“Organic”category
  13. 13. WB Fatigue ?Add a 14th WB CategoryHundreds of WB Letters &Pages per Year13
  14. 14. Conclusions• Organics Waste Ban can be implemented @“downstream” SW Facilities but effectivenessunclear– Yard wastes most visible; food wastes not– More Waste Ban letters (Hauler/Customer fatigue)– Can’t ID organic waste from ICI (Banned portion)• Suggest different “upstream” approach to betterreach Generators and improve diversion %March 2013 14
  15. 15. Policy Options: Is there much difference?• Organics Waste toAnaerobic Digestion:– Digester Biogas;combust to createrenewable electricity– Beneficial Reuse ofmost digester solids;dispose of non-useable residuals• Organics Waste toEfW Facility:– Combust to createrenewable electricity(Class II Renewable)– Beneficial Reuse ofmost ash (bottom);dispose of non-useable residuals (fly)March 2013 15

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