Group members areIrum nadeem        03Aneera younas      60Maryum iqbal       73Jahangir Ahmed     09
Bias                                   What is                                   bias ?“ Bias is a one side view which a ...
Bias At one time or other we all complain about "bias in the media." The    fact is, despite the journalistic ideal of "o...
Bias in the NewsObjectives:To understand what the terms‘media’ and ‘bias’ meanTo discuss the role of THEMEDIATo learn h...
Bias in the news No matter how objective the news agency is there will be some bias  in the news. Not all bias is delibe...
Bias found in the newsConsider these two sentences in a news story:   “A crowd of more than 900 attended the protest.” “...
How to Detect Bias in the NewsEvery news story is affected by:    thoughts    opinions    backgroundof these people:    in...
Types of bias Bias through selection and omission Bias through Placement Bias by photos and camera angles Bias by spin...
Bias through selection and omission An editor can express a bias by choosing to use or not to use a specific news  item....
Bias through placement Usually, the stories that are chosen  to be put first are seen as more  important. Stories in the...
Bias by photos and camera angles    Some photos can make the subject look serious,    attractive, healthy, etc. and other...
Bias photo Compare these…To these……
Photos BiasWhich picture is positive and which is negative?Camera angles and sound can also influence howsomething is inte...
Bias by spin One sided interpretation of an event. Emphasizing characteristics of a policy favourable to left  wings wit...
Bias by selection of sources     This bias can also be seen when a reporter uses such phrases as    “experts believe”, “o...
Bias through names and titles News media often use labels and titles to describe people, places  and events. A person is...
Bias by headline Many people read only the headlines of a news items. Most peoples  scan nearly all the headlines in a ne...
Bias by source control To detect bias, always consider where the news item "comes from." Is the information supplied by...
Bias through Statistics and crowd counts  Numbers and statistics can be  manipulated to change the way  we think about the...
Bias by word choice and tone The words and tone the journalist uses can influence the story. Using positive or negative ...
Word Choice
What isn’t biasIt falls into categories:Editorials or opinion columns written by known as fair independent,on staff membe...
Presentation. bias in the news (2)
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Presentation. bias in the news (2)

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Presentation was presented by the student of Replica, Mass comm departrment.
Supervisor and resourse person: M Ahmad Sheikh Ex. Deputy Controller, Head of National Broadcasting Service. Lahore. Pakistan

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  • Booing is an act of showing displeasure for someone or something,handfull mean fistfull,a quantity that fills the hand. Dissidents mean disagreeing or dissenting, as in opinion or attitude. Jeer mean taunting remark or shout.
  • Presentation. bias in the news (2)

    1. 1. Group members areIrum nadeem 03Aneera younas 60Maryum iqbal 73Jahangir Ahmed 09
    2. 2. Bias What is bias ?“ Bias is a one side view which a person may havesome reason or motivation to see things in a certainway.”
    3. 3. Bias At one time or other we all complain about "bias in the media." The fact is, despite the journalistic ideal of "objectivity,“ (without bias or prejudice) every news story is influenced by the attitudes and background of its interviewers, writers, photographers and editors. For example: If two people had a fight in the school yard, each one would report the incident according to his/her point of view. Other people who saw the fight might also have a certain bias or point of view when they tell the story, depending on the experience they brought to the fight, and their feelings about the people involved in the fight.
    4. 4. Bias in the NewsObjectives:To understand what the terms‘media’ and ‘bias’ meanTo discuss the role of THEMEDIATo learn how to spot bias in thenewsTo consider how media bias islinked to politicsTo consider the ‘rights andwrongs’ of media bias
    5. 5. Bias in the news No matter how objective the news agency is there will be some bias in the news. Not all bias is deliberate.
    6. 6. Bias found in the newsConsider these two sentences in a news story: “A crowd of more than 900 attended the protest.” “Fewer than 1,000 showed up to protest.”
    7. 7. How to Detect Bias in the NewsEvery news story is affected by: thoughts opinions backgroundof these people: interviewer reporter photographer editor
    8. 8. Types of bias Bias through selection and omission Bias through Placement Bias by photos and camera angles Bias by spin Bias by names and titles Bias by selection of sources Bias by headline Bias by statistics and crowd counts Bias by word Choice & Tone
    9. 9. Bias through selection and omission An editor can express a bias by choosing to use or not to use a specific news item. Within a given story, some details can be ignored, and others included, to give readers or viewers a different opinion about the events reported. Bias through omission is difficult to detect. Only by comparing news reports from a wide variety of outlets can the form of bias be observed. For example:If, during a speech, a few people boo, the reactioncan be described as "remarks greeted by jeers" orthey can be ignored as "a handful of dissidents."
    10. 10. Bias through placement Usually, the stories that are chosen to be put first are seen as more important. Stories in the back of the paper or at the end of the news broadcast are seen as less important.For example: If a story about the disaster in Karachi is on the front page of the paper, it will be seen as more important. If the story about Karachi disaster is buried at the back of the paper, it will be seen as less important.
    11. 11. Bias by photos and camera angles  Some photos can make the subject look serious, attractive, healthy, etc. and other photos can be really unflattering and make them look silly, ugly, sick, etc.  The images of someone in the news can influence how we think about them.
    12. 12. Bias photo Compare these…To these……
    13. 13. Photos BiasWhich picture is positive and which is negative?Camera angles and sound can also influence howsomething is interpreted.
    14. 14. Bias by spin One sided interpretation of an event. Emphasizing characteristics of a policy favourable to left wings without noting aspects favourable to right wings. For example: Party spokesman who talk with reporters after general elections in connection with justifying the win of controversial candidate. A political press agent or publicist employed to promote a favourable interpretation of events of journalists
    15. 15. Bias by selection of sources This bias can also be seen when a reporter uses such phrases as “experts believe”, “observers say”, or “most people think”.For example: When a reporter says “most experts believe….”, he often means, “I believe….” .quoting an expert by names does not necessarily add to the credibility of a story, because the reporter may choose any “expert” he wants. The same goes for the use of politicians or “man on the street” interviews.
    16. 16. Bias through names and titles News media often use labels and titles to describe people, places and events. A person is described as a ‘terrorist’ or a ‘freedom fighter’ is a clear indication of editorial bias.
    17. 17. Bias by headline Many people read only the headlines of a news items. Most peoples scan nearly all the headlines in a newspaper. Headlines are the most read part of a paper. They can summarize as well as present carefully hidden bias and prejudices. They can convey excitement where little exists. They can express approval or condemnation
    18. 18. Bias by source control To detect bias, always consider where the news item "comes from." Is the information supplied by a reporter, an eyewitness, police or fire officials, executives, or elected or appointed government officials? Each may have a particular bias that is introduced into the story.
    19. 19. Bias through Statistics and crowd counts Numbers and statistics can be manipulated to change the way we think about them. For example: Describing disaster story on radio or tv numbers can be inflated. “A hundred injured in air crash” can be the same as “only minor injuries in air crash” reflecting the opinion of the person doing the counting. During elections campaigns numbers game is very common. Biased report of commercially paid reporters has been noticed on my occasions
    20. 20. Bias by word choice and tone The words and tone the journalist uses can influence the story. Using positive or negative words with a particular connotation can strongly influence the readers or viewers. For example: “The politician presented his well-thought out and intelligent plan to Congress.” “The politician presented his shoddy and disorganized plan to Congress.”
    21. 21. Word Choice
    22. 22. What isn’t biasIt falls into categories:Editorials or opinion columns written by known as fair independent,on staff member of a news paper of broadcast media.Stories or statements that make the conservative side look bad, butare accurate.Non-policy stories on a specific event that don’t have to be balanced.Panel discussion comprises representatives of all groups.If anchor / presenter behaves like public representative.Clean from editorializing.

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