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Addiction
Figure 1
Source: vladimatrix. (2008). Addiction. Retrieved from
http://www.deviantart.com/art/Addiction-83035642...
What is Addiction?
Addiction is a primary, chronic disease of brain reward,
motivation, memory and related circuitry. Dysf...
Nature vs Nurture

Genetic factors account for about half of the
likelihood that an individual will develop
addiction. Env...
Characterizations of Addiction
a.  Inability to
consistently Abstain;
b.  Impairment in Behavioral
control;
c.  Hunger or ...
Risk of Relapse
Can be triggered by exposure to
rewarding substances and behaviors, by
exposure to environmental cues to u...
Addiction is more than a behavioral
disorder. 

Features of addiction include aspects of a
person’s behaviors, cognitions,...
Behavioral Manifestations
•  Excessive use and/or engagement in addictive behaviors, at
higher frequencies and/or quantiti...
Cognitive Changes
•  Preoccupation with
substance use;
•  Altered evaluations of the
relative benefits and
detriments assoc...
Emotional Changes
•  Increased anxiety, dysphoria and emotional
pain;
•  Increased sensitivity to stressors associated
wit...
People who overcome addiction generally…
•  Learn to accept and feel their feelings so they can be naturally
processed.

•...
As in other health conditions, self-
management, with mutual support,
is very important in recovery from
addiction (Americ...
References
•  American Society of Addiction
Medicine. (2011). Definition of
addiction. Retrieved from http://
www.asam.org/...
Reference of Figures
•  Figure 1: Source: vladimatrix. (2008). Addiction.
Retrieved from http://www.deviantart.com/art/
Ad...
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Addiction

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Addiction

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Addiction

  1. 1. Addiction Figure 1 Source: vladimatrix. (2008). Addiction. Retrieved from http://www.deviantart.com/art/Addiction-83035642    
  2. 2. What is Addiction? Addiction is a primary, chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory and related circuitry. Dysfunction in these circuits leads to characteristic biological, psychological, social and spiritual manifestations. This is reflected in an individual pathologically pursuing reward and/or relief by substance use and other behaviors (American Society of Addiction Medicine, 2011). Addiction is characterized by inability to consistently abstain, impairment in behavioral control, craving, diminished recognition of significant problems with one’s behaviors and interpersonal relationships, and a dysfunctional emotional response. Like other chronic diseases, addiction often involves cycles of relapse and remission. Without treatment or engagement in recovery activities, addiction is progressive and can result in disability or premature death (American Society of Addiction Medicine, 2011).
  3. 3. Nature vs Nurture Genetic factors account for about half of the likelihood that an individual will develop addiction. Environmental factors interact with the person’s biology and affect the extent to which genetic factors exert their influence. Resiliencies the individual acquires (through parenting or later life experiences) can affect the extent to which genetic predispositions lead to the behavioral and other manifestations of addiction (American Society of Addiction Medicine, 2011).
  4. 4. Characterizations of Addiction a.  Inability to consistently Abstain; b.  Impairment in Behavioral control; c.  Hunger or Craving; increased desire for drugs or rewarding experiences; d.  Low or Diminished recognition of significant problems with one’s behaviors and interpersonal relationships; and e.  A dysfunctional Emotional response (American Society of Addiction Medicine, 2011). Figure 2 Source: napanjuma. (2008). addiction. Retrieved from http://www.deviantart.com/art/addiction-82536734
  5. 5. Risk of Relapse Can be triggered by exposure to rewarding substances and behaviors, by exposure to environmental cues to use, and by exposure to emotional stressors that trigger heightened activity in brain stress circuits (American Society of Addiction Medicine, 2011).
  6. 6. Addiction is more than a behavioral disorder. Features of addiction include aspects of a person’s behaviors, cognitions, emotions, and interactions with others, including a person’s ability to relate to members of their family, to members of their community, to their own psychological state, and to things that transcend their daily experience.
  7. 7. Behavioral Manifestations •  Excessive use and/or engagement in addictive behaviors, at higher frequencies and/or quantities than the person intended, often associated with a persistent desire for and unsuccessful attempts at behavioral control; •  Excessive time lost in substance use or recovering from the effects of substance use and/or engagement in addictive behaviors, with significant adverse impact on social and occupational functioning. •  Continued use and/or engagement in addictive behaviors, despite the presence of persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problems which may have been caused or exacerbated by substance use and/or related addictive behaviors; •  A narrowing of the behavioral repertoire focusing on rewards that are part of addiction; and •  An apparent lack of ability and/or readiness to take consistent, ameliorative action despite recognition of problems (American Society of Addiction Medicine, 2011).
  8. 8. Cognitive Changes •  Preoccupation with substance use; •  Altered evaluations of the relative benefits and detriments associated with drugs or rewarding behaviors; and •  The inaccurate belief that problems experienced in one’s life are attributable to other causes rather than being a predictable consequence of addiction (American Society of Addiction Medicine, 2011). Figure 3 Source: sozesoze. (2008). Addiction. Retrieved from http://www.deviantart.com/art/Addiction-75676969
  9. 9. Emotional Changes •  Increased anxiety, dysphoria and emotional pain; •  Increased sensitivity to stressors associated with the recruitment of brain stress systems, such that “things seem more stressful” as a result; and •  Difficulty in identifying feelings, distinguishing between feelings and the bodily sensations of emotional arousal, and describing feelings to other people (American Society of Addiction Medicine, 2011).
  10. 10. People who overcome addiction generally… •  Learn to accept and feel their feelings so they can be naturally processed. •  Develop alternative rewards that are more meaningful than addiction. # •  Get support from family, friends, or mutual-support groups. # •  Avoid situations that provoke relapse. # •  Develop frustration tolerance. # •  Develop self-acceptance. # •  See addiction's negative consequences. # •  Develop a lifestyle more rewarding than an addictive lifestyle. # •  Become more connected with their core values (Mensing, 2014).
  11. 11. As in other health conditions, self- management, with mutual support, is very important in recovery from addiction (American Society of Addiction Medicine, 2011). Figure 4 Source: petegray. (2009) Group isolation tank therapy. Retrieved from http://www.deviantart.com/art/Group-Isolation-Tank- Therapy-144601054
  12. 12. References •  American Society of Addiction Medicine. (2011). Definition of addiction. Retrieved from http:// www.asam.org/for-the-public/ definition-of-addiction •  Mensing, S. (2014). Overcoming addiction. Retrieved from http:// www.self-helpapedia.com/ addiction.htm
  13. 13. Reference of Figures •  Figure 1: Source: vladimatrix. (2008). Addiction. Retrieved from http://www.deviantart.com/art/ Addiction-83035642 •  Figure 2: Source: napanjuma. (2008). addiction. Retrieved from http://www.deviantart.com/art/ addiction-82536734 •  Figure 3: Source: sozesoze. (2008). Addiction. Retrieved from http://www.deviantart.com/art/ Addiction-75676969 •  Figure 4: Source: petegray. (2009) Group isolation tank therapy. Retrieved from http://www.deviantart.com/art/ Group-Isolation-Tank-Therapy-144601054

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