From toy to tool:
why tablets in school?
Mart Laanpere
Senior researcher @ Institute of Informatics
head of the Centre for...
Hopes and fears
• Radio in the school 1927
• Internet ban in Danish school 1996, laptop
ban in TUT 2011
• Why should we tr...
Impact of ICT: the Great Media Debate
• Clark (1983): educational media is merely as “vehicles that deliver
the instructio...
Hawkridge (1990) rationales for ICT
• The Social Rationale: the mission of schools is to prepare the citizens of
digital s...
Vocabulary reflects the idea
• 1970: computer-based learning
• 1980: computer-assisted learning
• 1990: multimedia learnin...
Concept mapping exercise
• Draw a concept map reflecting the key
concepts, characteristics etc related with the
use of tab...
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TSP: why tablets in schools?

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TSP: why tablets in schools?

  1. 1. From toy to tool: why tablets in school? Mart Laanpere Senior researcher @ Institute of Informatics head of the Centre for Educational Technology
  2. 2. Hopes and fears • Radio in the school 1927 • Internet ban in Danish school 1996, laptop ban in TUT 2011 • Why should we try to introduce tablets in classroom? Three pro’s, three con’s • Is the teacher who uses tablets in teaching and learning, better than others?
  3. 3. Impact of ICT: the Great Media Debate • Clark (1983): educational media is merely as “vehicles that deliver the instruction but do not influence the student achievement any more than the truck that delivers our groceries causes changes our nutrition”; it is merely an economic issue by arguing that “if different media … yield similar learning gains…, then we must always choose the less expensive way to achieve a learning goal” • Kozma (1994): “If we move from ‘Do media influence learning?’ to ‘In what ways can we use the capabilities of media to influence learning for particular students, tasks, and situations?’ we will both advance the development of our field and contribute to the improvement of teaching and learning” • Jonassen (1999a) not “learning from media”but “learning with technology”
  4. 4. Hawkridge (1990) rationales for ICT • The Social Rationale: the mission of schools is to prepare the citizens of digital society, who are awareness of, and familiarity with, digital technology. Those who are not are facing the threat to be excluded and cut of from various benefits. For that reason, schools have to address the threat of widening digital divide in the society and demystify computers and network technologies by making them a normal part of everyday living, working and learning environment. • The Vocational Rationale: children should become competent users of technology in order to be prepared for a career in IT industry, or one in which computers will be needed (which means virtually the majority of the jobs tomorrow). • The Pedagogic Rationale: teaching and learning with computers has various advantages also from the pedagogical perspective. Hawkridge brings several examples from the science education here, although there are no subjects where digital technology would not have a potential to enrich, extend and improve the practice of teaching and learning. • The Catalytic Rationale: Schools can be changed for the better with the help of technology. Technology-inspired innovation in school organisation may open the door for other types of innovation.
  5. 5. Vocabulary reflects the idea • 1970: computer-based learning • 1980: computer-assisted learning • 1990: multimedia learning • 1995: ICT in learning • 2000: e-learning • 2010: learning in the digital age
  6. 6. Concept mapping exercise • Draw a concept map reflecting the key concepts, characteristics etc related with the use of tablets in classroom • Concept map is not mind map: – Arrows, not just lines – Labels on arrows (verbs) – Each triple (concept-relation-concept) can be read as a proposition

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