Martin bordeaux-v2 (2)

347 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
347
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Martin bordeaux-v2 (2)

  1. 1. Personnalité  et     Personnages  Virtuels   Interac2fs   Jean-­‐Claude  MARTIN   MARTIN@LIMSI.FR   Professeur    informa2que  Université  Paris-­‐Sud  /  CNRS-­‐LIMSI     (M.  Courgeon,  C.  Clavel,  N.  Tan,  C.  Zakaria)  
  2. 2. Vision   Scénario  fic2f  illustra2f   •  Recherche  d’informa2on  dans  une  bibliothèque  futuriste   2  
  3. 3. Défini2ons   •  Agent  Conversa2onnel  Animé  /   Embodied  Conversa2onal  Agent   •  Interface  Homme-­‐Machine   –  Capacités  communica2ves  verbales   et  non-­‐verbales  inspirées  de  la   communica2on  humaine  (ex:   ges2on  des  tours  de  parole)   Jean-­‐Claude  MARTIN  -­‐  LIMSI/CNRS   3  
  4. 4. Avantages  et  inconvénients   •  Avantages  aYendus  :  interac2on  intui2ve,  ludique   •  Applica2ons  possibles  :     –  enseignement,  assistance,  ou2l  expérimental   •  Inconvénients  /  dangers  possibles   4  
  5. 5. Concep2on  et  évalua2on   5  
  6. 6. Plan  de  l’exposé   1.  Style  gestuel  individuel   2.  Emo2ons   –  Expressions  faciales  et  posturales   –  Evalua2on  cogni2ve  durant  l’interac2on   3.  Personnalité   6  
  7. 7. 1  –  Style  gestuel  individuel   7  
  8. 8. Le  style  gestuel   •  Ques2on  de  recherche     –  Est-­‐ce  que  2  individus  ont  le  même  profil  gestuel  ?     •  Approche  :     –  Corpus  mul2modaux   •  Applica2on  aux  personnages  virtuels   8  
  9. 9. Corpus  de  Gestes  Conversa2onnels   (Kipp  04)   •  Lemma     –  Groupe  de  gestes  partageant  la   même  fonc2on  et  la  même   forme   •  Forme  d’un  geste   –  Mains:  Gauche  /  Droite  /  2   Mains   –  Forme  de  la  main   –  Posi2on  de  la  main   –  Orienta2on  de  la  main   –  Mouvement  de  la  main   –  Epaules  et  expressions  faciales   Jean-­‐Claude  MARTIN  -­‐  LIMSI/CNRS   9  
  10. 10. Calcul  d’un  profil  gestuel  (Kipp  &  Neff)   •  Diagrammes  de  transi2on   10  
  11. 11. Créa2on  du  profil  de  MR   11  
  12. 12. Créa2on  du  profil  de  JL   12  
  13. 13. U2lisa2on  pour  la  généra2on   13  
  14. 14. 2  –  Emo2on   14  
  15. 15. Théories  des  émo2ons   Défini2ons  (Scherer  00)   •  Defini2on   –  Hypothe2cal  construct  deno2ng  a  process  of  an  organism’s  reac2on  to   significant  events   •  Modern  defini2on   –  Components:  subjec2ve  feeling,  motor  expression,  ac2on  tendencies,   physiological  changes,  cogni2ve  processing   –  Episode  of  interrelated,  synchronized  changes  in  these  components  in  response   to  an  event  of  major  significance  to  the  organism   •  Func2ons  of  emo2ons   –  Expression:  Communica2on,  social  signalling  and  interac2on  strategy   –  Feeling:  facilitates  regula2on  of  emo2onal  behavior   Jean-­‐Claude  MARTIN  -­‐  LIMSI/CNRS   15  
  16. 16. Emo2on   •  Approche  catégorielle   – 6  émo2ons  de  base   – Différentes  classifica2ons   – Emo2ons  secondaires   – Etats  mentaux   •  Approche  dimensionnelle   – Plaisir   – Ac2va2on   – Dominance   16  
  17. 17. Théories  des  émo2ons   Emo2ons  secondaires  (Plutchik  80)   •  Axes   – Ver2cal  :     intensité   – Diamètre  :     opposi2on   – Périphérie  :     proximité  
  18. 18. Théorie  des  émo2ons   Catégories  et  dimensions  
  19. 19. Emo2ons   Expressions  Faciales  +  Posturales   •  Spécifica2ons  :     – liYérature  (Ekman)   – base  de  donnée  de  capture  de  mouvement   (Berthouze)   •  Congruentes   •  Incongruentes   19  
  20. 20. Vidéo   20  
  21. 21. Résultats   •  Meilleure  reconnaissance  avec  présenta2on   conjointe  du  visage  et  de  la  posture   –  Cohérent  avec  Gunes  &  Picardi   •  Les  expressions  faciales  sont  importantes  pour   la  reconnaissance  des  catégories  d’émo2on   – Cohérent  avec  Hietanen  and  Leppänen   •  Les  expressions  posturales  sont  plus  u2lisées   pour  la  percep2on  de  l’ac2va2on   21  
  22. 22. MARC   J.-­‐C.  MARTIN  -­‐  LIMSI-­‐CNRS  /  AMI   22  
  23. 23. Expressions  faciales  réalistes   •  Rendu  temps-­‐réel  d’expressions  faciales   23  
  24. 24. Experiment:   Wrinkle  and  Emo2ons   J.-­‐C.  MARTIN  -­‐  LIMSI-­‐CNRS  /  AMI   24  
  25. 25. Résultats   25  
  26. 26. Appraising  events  in  real-­‐2me   •  The  Componen2al  Process   Appraised  Event   Model  (CPM)  (Scherer)     –  Event  based  model   Temporary   Appraisal   Visible   –  Cycles  of  events’  mul2-­‐level   Evalua2on  cycle   Appraisal   evalua2ons   Signs   •  Including  signs  of  sequences  of   appraisals  in  virtual  characters   Resul2ng     Visible   might  improve  how  they  are   emo2onal  state   emo2ons   perceived  by  users   •  Few  system  display  facial  clues  of   appraisal   –  Paleari  et  al.  and  Malatesta  et  al.   presented  facial  anima2on   systems  using  Scherer's  work   –  Do  not  appraise  events  in  real-­‐ 2me  during  interac2on   J.-­‐C.  MARTIN  -­‐  LIMSI-­‐CNRS  /  AMI   26  
  27. 27. Evalua2on  de  la  situa2on   Interac2ve   Emo2onal   Facial     Game   Computa2ons   Anima2on   Appraisal  Registers   Subchecks  Sequence   Game  Applica2on   Othello   Appraisal  Module   MARC   Appraisal  values  of   Facial  anima2on  parameters   Real-­‐2me  game  events   Ac2on  Units     Emo$onML   -­‐  LIMSI-­‐CNRS  /  AMI   J.-­‐C.  MARTIN   BML   27  
  28. 28. Video   J.-­‐C.  MARTIN  -­‐  LIMSI-­‐CNRS  /  AMI   28  
  29. 29. 3  –  Personnalité   29  
  30. 30. Personnalité   •  Approches  lexicales   – Modèles  pour  décrire  des  individus   •  Approches  psychosociales   – Interac2on  sociale  :  désirabilité  (ami),  u2lité  (aide)   •  Approches  socio-­‐cogni2ves   – Comprendre  les  mécanismes  des  ac2ons  des   indivividus   30  
  31. 31. Approches  de  la  personalité   Socio  cogni>ve   Lexical  approach   Psychosocial  approach   approach   Goal  of  the   Descrip>ve  model  to   Percep>on  of  individual   Explanatory  model  of   approach   classify  individuals     differences     human  behavior   Role  of   environment  in  the   No  important   Important   Very  important   construc2on  of   one’s  personality   Inter-­‐   Intra-­‐   Variability   individual   individual   31  
  32. 32. OCEAN  (Costa  &  Mc  Crae)   •  Openness   –  Low:  conven2onal,  realis2c   –  High:  curious,  original,  crea2ve   •  Conscien2ousness   –  Low:  not  reliable,  nonchalant   –  High:  organized,  on  2me,  persistent   •  Agreeableness   –  Low:  impolite,  irritable,  not  coopera2ve,  manipulator   –  High:  easy  to  live  with,  trus2ng   •  Extraversion   –  Low:  reserved,  distant,  discreet   –  High:  social,  ac2ve,  op2mis2c,  like  to  have  fun,  affec2onate   •  Neuro2cism   –  Low:  calm,  relaxed,  sa2sfied   –  High:  worried,  nervous,  emo2onal,  anxious   Jean-­‐Claude  MARTIN  -­‐  LIMSI/CNRS   32  
  33. 33. Personnalité   •  Le  modèle  ALMA  (Gebhard  05)   – Emo2on  :  OCC   – Personnalité  :  OCEAN   •  Sert  à  calculer  l’intensité  de  l’émo2on   – Mood  :  PAD   33  
  34. 34. Hypothesis  :  the  field-­‐dependency  dimension  influences   mul2modal  expression  of  emo2on   People  who  are  field   Situa2on  of  Anger   independent  (FI)   • do  not  consider   • His  movements   much  the  point  of   are  broader  and   view  of  others     quicker  than  FD’s   People  who  are  field   Situa2on  of  Joy   dependent  (FD)   • share  the  situa2on   • His  gesture  are   with  others   more  empha2c   than  FI’s   34  
  35. 35. Illustra>ve  result:     Ac>on  tendency  “want  to  dance”   2,5   tendency  “character  wanted   Percep2on  of  ac2on   2   to  dance”   1,5   Situa2on  of  Anger   1   Ambigous  Situa2on   Situa2on  of  Joy   0,5   0   FD   FI   35  
  36. 36. Research  Context   Embodied  Agents   •  Designing  agent’s  mul2modal  behavior   –  Redundant  vs.  complementary  behaviors     (André  et  al.  00,  Cassell    et  al.  01)   –  Influence  of  agent’s  personality  (Kshirsagar  02,  Gebhard  05)   –  Influence  of  users’  personality?   •  Matching  user  and  agent’s  personality  (Ibister  &  Nass  00)   •  Combine  (extrovert  /  introvert)  X  (text  /  posture)   •  Results   –  Users  iden2fy  intended  personality   –  Users  prefer  consistent  verbal  &  nonverbal     –  Users  prefer  complementary  agent   •  Consider  only  text  and  posture   Jean-­‐Claude  MARTIN  -­‐  LIMSI/CNRS   36  
  37. 37. Percep2on  of  agent’s  deic2c   (Buisine  &  Mar2n  2007)   •  Goal   –  LT:  Inform  the  design  of   Conversa2onal  Agents     –  How  to  balance  content  on  speech   and  gesture?   –  How  such  combina2ons  are   perceived  by  different  users?   •  Approach   –  2D  cartoon  animated  agents   –  Manual  specifica2ons   –  References  to  objects  during   technical  presenta2ons   Jean-­‐Claude  MARTIN  -­‐  LIMSI/CNRS   37  
  38. 38. You have to use You have to use You have to use the big round button in this button. the big round button in the center. the center. Jean-­‐Claude  MARTIN  -­‐  LIMSI/CNRS   38  
  39. 39. Each user sees 3 presentations Subjective Eval.: ECA 1 ECA 2 ECA 3 Written Recall 81 Likeability Strategy X Strategy Y Strategy Z users of the lesson Expressiveness Object A Object B Object C of the 3 ECAs All counterbalanced (ECA, Multimodal strategy, Object) Independent Variables: Dependent Variables: User’s User’s ECA’s Multimodal strategy Cognitive perf. (memorization) Gender Personality Perceived Likeability of ECA Redundant Male Introvert Female Extrovert Complementary Perceived Expressiveness of ECA Control Jean-­‐Claude  MARTIN  -­‐  LIMSI/CNRS   39  
  40. 40. Gender  X  Personality     Interac2on   •  Interac2on   –  On  Recall  Performance  -­‐  F(2/154)=3,12;  p=0,047   –  On  Perceived  Expressiveness  -­‐  F(2/154)=3,19;  p=0,044   –  No  effect  of  Gender  nor  Personality  on  Likeability   Jean-­‐Claude  MARTIN  -­‐  LIMSI/CNRS   40  
  41. 41. 4  –  Conclusions  et  perspec2ves   41  
  42. 42. Conclusions   •  U2lité  des  personnages  virtuels  pour  étudier   la  communica2on  humaine   •  Défis  à  relever   – Conceptuels   – Pluridisciplinaires   – Technologiques     42  
  43. 43. Perspec2ves   •  Autres  approches  de  la  personnalité  ?   •  Impact  de  la  personnalité  sur  l’émo2on   •  Impact  de  l’âge,  du  genre,  de  la  culture   •  Usages  long  terme  ?   43  

×