ORA Workshop Presentation

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ORA Workshop Presentation

  1. 1. HELPING CLAIMANTS MAKE EDUCATED CAREER AND JOB TARGET DECISIONS PRESENTED BY: MARSHALL J. KARP, MA NCC LPC CAREER COUNSELOR
  2. 2. Career & Job Target Workshop  Why do career assessment?  What is a good assessment?  How to do basic assessment?  How to make educated career decisions
  3. 3. Why do assessment?  Improvement  Accountability  Goals and Plans
  4. 4. Improvement  Determine where they are at  Set timeframes  Achievement
  5. 5. Sun Tzu  If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles.  If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat.  If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle”
  6. 6. Accountability  Meeting Expectations  Clear and Understandable Guidelines
  7. 7. What is assessment? Assessment is a systematic process of looking at client achievement by gathering, interpreting and using information for improvement.
  8. 8. Basic Vocational Assessment  Verbal  Written
  9. 9. Verbal Assessment  What do you want to do?  Describe your background/experience/training?  Why aren’t you doing this?  Set objectives  If a realistic and feasible job target, no need for written assessment  Set this as a goal
  10. 10. Written Assessments  Identify potential client goals  Collect, analyze and interpret data  Develop a direction in writing  People are enamored with assessments
  11. 11. The 3 Laws of Unemployotics A term coined in late 2010 to describe the study of the reasons for the long term unemployed. I coined it
  12. 12. The 3 Laws of Unemployotics  Improper Job Search Technique  Element of Choice  Long, Nasty Job Hunt
  13. 13. Job Search Technique  Traditional Versus Non-Traditional  Waiting for Rescue  Why Bother?
  14. 14. Element of Choice  Voluntary  Non-Voluntary
  15. 15. Long, Nasty Job Hunt  Doing Everything Correctly  Really Trying  Encourage Along
  16. 16. Basic Vocational Assessments  Interest Inventory  Transferable Skills
  17. 17. Interest Inventory  Holland Self-Directed Search  Matches Interest Areas to Job Titles  Generates Ideas  Generates Discussion  Taking a Step  People are enamored with assessments
  18. 18. Transferable Skills  Skills that Move from Environment to Environment  Often Referred to as “The Basics”
  19. 19. Transferable Skills Scale  Breaks Skills Areas Into Categories  Matches Categories with Job Titles  Useful with Interview Skills  Useful with Resume
  20. 20. O*Net Career Interest Inventory  U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Information Network  Matches interests to job titles
  21. 21. Assessment Goals  Consistency  Ideas  Discussion  Self-Direction  Self-Motivation  Realistic and Feasible Goals
  22. 22. Ultimate Goal  Develop a Written Ideal Job Description  Interests  Transferable Skills  Physician’s Restrictions  What is it?
  23. 23.  Car  Test  Green  Zero  Paper  Up  Gross  Search  Down  Great  Single  Jelly  Season  Tree  Window  Lion  Share  Purple
  24. 24.  Car  Test  Green  Zero  Paper  Up  Gross  Search  Down  Great  Single  Jelly  Season  Tree  Window  Lion  Share  Purple
  25. 25.  Car  Test  Green  Zero  Paper  Up  Gross  Search  Down  Great  Single  Jelly  Season  Tree  Window  Lion  Share  Purple
  26. 26. What If No Realistic Goal?  Indicator of Possible Field  Look for Patterns  Need to Find Entry Level Position  Ask for Ideas  Post Job Description on Internet Forums  Beyond the Basic Level of this Workshop  Referral to Career/Vocational Specialist
  27. 27. Career Exploration  Books  Internet  Information Interviews
  28. 28. Books  Occupational Outlook Handbook  Dictionary of Occupational Titles  O*NET  Career Books
  29. 29. Internet  Google Searches  www.bls.gov/oco  Occupational Outlook Handbook  LinkedIn  U.S. Department of Labor  http://lmi.state.oh.us  ODJFS Labor Market Information
  30. 30. Caution  Never base a career or training decision on book or internet labor market information
  31. 31. Employment Projection Limitations  The projections model also assumes an unemployment rate of 5.1 percent in 2018. http://http://www.bls.gov/oco/oco2006.htm
  32. 32. Employment Projection Limitations  As with all forecasts and projections, Labor Market Projections are subject to error, especially if events negate underlying assumptions. http://lmi.state.oh.us/proj/projections.htm
  33. 33. Never Base Career Decision on Trends  1960s – Math, Science, Engineering  1970’s – Solar, Wind, Gasohol  1980s – Teaching  1990s – Computers, Y2K  2000s – Internet, Telecommute, Security  20--s – Healthcare, Green Energy
  34. 34. Information Interviews  Talking to people to research the job or career  Always have questions prepared in advance  Stress this will help make a career/training decision  Get names of two other people  Always send a thank you note
  35. 35. Questions  What skills are important?  What personality traits are important?  What training/school would you suggest?  How many employees do you have?  How often do you hire here?  Is this industry expected to grow?  Starting salary and after one year?  What are the physical requirements?  Names of two other people?
  36. 36. Look for Consensus  People in the field are considered subject matter experts  Do five information interviews and look for consistency  Continue to do information interviews until a trend develops  Verify!
  37. 37. Making Educated Decisions  Labor market information is crucial  Need to know what to expect when done  Get subject matter experts to lay out the training/school
  38. 38. Effective Performance Documentation  Relate to goals  Focus on the vital few elements to measure  Foster improvement  Are well communicated and measurable  Are reviewed as often as appropriate  Provide information on level, trend and comparative/competitive data  Focus on the long-term well-being of the client
  39. 39. Achievement Blockers  Fuzzy goals or action strategies  Incorrect focus  No agreement on priorities
  40. 40. Assessment Reveals the Gap Client Start Point Bridgeing the Gap Client Goal
  41. 41. Effective Career Planning Closes the Gap Client Start Point Client Goal
  42. 42. Identify Strategies for Change  What will you do to reach goal?  Which program elements could assist?
  43. 43. Remember  Be flexible, adaptive and prepared to adjust to change  There will always be problems  Things always change (mandates, circumstance, personal priorities)  View assessment and goals as an evolutionary process
  44. 44. Bibliography  Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2009-10 Edition  The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles, Jist Works, Inc. Indianapolis, IN. 1998  U.S. Department of Labor, Dictionary of Occupational Titles, Jist Works, Inc, Indianapolis, IN. 1991  What Color Is Your Parachute?: A Practical Manual for Job Hunters and Career Changers, Richard N. Bolles, 2010  JIST Inc. – (800) 648-JIST  Handouts are at www.marshalljkarp.com  Handouts are at www.slideshare.net/marshallkarp
  45. 45. NEED MORE INFORMATION? Marshall J. Karp MA NCC LPC Career Counselor marshallkarp@hotmail.com

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