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Towards the Prediction of Dyslexia by a Web-based Game with Musical Elements.

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Paper Presented at the Web for All Conference in Perth, Australia

M. Rauschenberger, L. Rello, R. Baeza-yates, E. Gomez, and J. P. Bigham, “Towards the Prediction of Dyslexia by a Web-based Game with Musical Elements,” w4a, pp. 4–7, 2017.

The generated musical elements are available at http://bit.ly/2jeejmC

The demo of the prototype DysMusic is available at http://bit.ly/DysMus

More Project can be found on www.mariarauschenberger.com

Abstract:
Current tools for screening dyslexia use linguistic elements,since most dyslexia manifestations are related to difficulties in reading and writing. These tools can only be used with children that have already acquired some reading skills and; sometimes, this detection comes too late to apply proper re-mediation. In this paper, we propose a method and present DysMusic, a prototype which aims to predict risk of having dyslexia before acquiring reading skills. The prototype was designed with the help of five children and five parents who tested the game using the think aloud protocol and being observed while playing. The advantages of DysMusicare that the approach is language independent and could be used with younger children,i.e., pre-readers.

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Towards the Prediction of Dyslexia by a Web-based Game with Musical Elements.

  1. 1. Towards the Prediction of Dyslexia by a Web-based Game with Musical Elements Maria Rauschenberger1 Luz Rello2 Ricardo Baeza-Yates1 Emilia Gomez1 Jeffrey P. Bigham2 1Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain 2Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburg, USA
  2. 2. Contributions • New indicators for predicting dyslexia while playing a Game called DysMusic. • Usability improvements to the first version of the game. 2 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com
  3. 3. Outline 1. Motivation 2. Why Musical Elements? 3. Content Design 4. User Study & Results 5. Conclusions & Future Work 3 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com
  4. 4. Motivation 4
  5. 5. Motivation - Dyslexia • What is dyslexia? • How many are affected? 5 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com
  6. 6. Motivation - Dyslexia • Who is affected? • How does dyslexia affect your life? 6 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com
  7. 7. Examples of Digital Detection: Pre-Readers • DYSL-X / DIESEL-X (Geurts et al. 2015, Audenaeren 2013) • Bielefelder Screening(Steinbrink and Lachmann 2014) • AGTB 5–12 (Steinbrink and Lachmann 2014) 7 Fig. DYSL-X game (Audenaeren 2013)
  8. 8. Dyslexia is normally detected using linguistic elements. That can only be possible when children have already developed reading skills. Is it possible to predict that a child may have dyslexia before s/he develops reading skills? 8 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com
  9. 9. 9 Why Musical Elements?
  10. 10. Indicators • Short-term memory difficulties • Phonological memory / awareness • Working memory ⇒ For Readers and Pre-Readers DysMusic 10 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com K. Overy. Dyslexia, Temporal Processing and Music: The Potential of Music as an Early Learning Aid for Dyslexic Children. Psychology of Music, 28(2):218–229, oct 2000. R. F. Port, “Meter and speech,” J. Phon., vol. 31, pp. 599–611, 2003.
  11. 11. Goals • Finding dyslexia pre-readers indicators related to music • Integration of successful items in a game to predict and intervene dyslexia 11 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com
  12. 12. 12 “What do you hear?” Content Design
  13. 13. Tasks Related to Indicators • Finding the same sound • Distinguishing between sounds • Short time interval perception, e.g. short-time intervals 13 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com Huss, M., Verney, J. P., Fosker, T., Mead, N., & Goswami, U. (2011). Music, rhythm, rise time perception and developmental dyslexia: Perception of musical meter predicts reading and phonology. Cortex, 47(6), 674–689.
  14. 14. Example of One Musical Element (Rhythm) 14 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com
  15. 15. Game DysMusic DysMusic 15 Fig. DysMusic @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com Video-Demo on the next page Link to the Video Link to the Demo
  16. 16. 16
  17. 17. Example • 4 tasks, each with 2 subtasks • One subtask with 4 cards, the other with 6 cards • 4 different acoustic parameters • Frequency • Length • Rise Time • Rhythm 17 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com Huss, M., Verney, J. P., Fosker, T., Mead, N., & Goswami, U. (2011). Music, rhythm, rise time perception and developmental dyslexia: Perception of musical meter predicts reading and phonology. Cortex, 47(6), 674–689. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2010.07.010
  18. 18. 18 User Study & Results
  19. 19. Usability Study • 5 users study • five children (user) and five parents • within-subject design, counter-balanced 19 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com J. Nielsen. Why You Only Need to Test with 5 Users. Jakob Nielsens Alertbox, 19 (September 23):1–4, 2000.
  20. 20. Results • Interaction: • After first task, they go faster, independent of the musical element • Musical Elements • Listen and concentrate carefully • Difficult level difference perception • Functionality • Video player ( HTML 5: video-tag to YouTube: Iframe-tag) 20 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com
  21. 21. Conclusions & Future Work 21 • Language independent • Could be for pre-readers • Visual Elements • Large-scale study in English, German & Spanish
  22. 22. Prediction of Dyslexia with Musical Elements while playing a Serious Game Thank you! Any Questions? 22 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com
  23. 23. Backup 23
  24. 24. Musical Elements DysMusic 24 @Rauschii | www.mariarauschenberger.com

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