Successfully reported this slideshow.

Primer on Play: Case Study for Knowledge Guru

585 views

Published on

As shared in #GE4L, great structure of how and why to create game based learning. Prime case study to use when discussing possibilities of gamification for business

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Primer on Play: Case Study for Knowledge Guru

  1. 1. . A Primer on Play brought to you by Bottom-Line Performance, Inc. Featuring the Knowledge Guru™ Game engine
  2. 2. Your Game Masters…aka presenters Sharon Boller President Lead designer, Knowledge Guru™ game engine. Steve Boller Marketing Strategist Developer, MobileConnect Guru game
  3. 3. Using Your Controls You’ll be able to see YOUR responses/questio ns….but not anyone else’s. They won’t see yours either.
  4. 4. What do we even MEAN by game? An activity that has an explicit goal or challenge, rules that guide achievement of the goal, interactivity with either other players or the game environment (or both), and feedback mechanisms that give clear cues as to how well or poorly you are performing. It results in a quantifiable outcome (you win/you lose, you hit the target, etc). Usually generates an emotional reaction in players.
  5. 5. • My organization currently uses game-based learning (GBL). • My organization wants to implement game-based learning. • I want to learn more about designing them. • My organization doesn’t understand the value of game-based learning. • In my organization, games = frivolous. A Poll – What’s True for You?
  6. 6. When I say game-based learning, you think…? • Video game or computer-based, desktop or laptop game. • Board game • Team-building or experiential game • Mobile game for tablet or phone. • Simulation
  7. 7. Here’s some examples we’ve produced A Paycheck Away: A tabletop game about homelessness
  8. 8. Here’s some examples we’ve produced The Grower Game: A digital game about growing rice
  9. 9. Here’s some examples we’ve produced The Grower Game: A digital game about growing rice
  10. 10. Here’s some examples we’ve produced Destroy the BBP: Avoiding blood-borne pathogens
  11. 11. Today’s agenda
  12. 12. • Hermann Ebbinghaus (1885) – exponential nature of forgetting. • Ability to retain information declines over time. In “schoolbook” or training settings, most students only remember about 10% after 3-6 days, meaning 90% gets lost WITHOUT REINFORCEMENT or OTHER MEANS. Red = no reinforcement. The Forgetting Curve
  13. 13. Why games? Play Game “I learned SO much by playing this game. It was tons of fun. I learned more by playing this game than any webinar, meeting, or document I’ve encountered.” “Mind- blowing” “Can you create more stuff like this?”
  14. 14. Why do games work? The short answer?
  15. 15. Why do games work? Because they are FUN.
  16. 16. But what’s FUN? • Winning • Achieving goals • Triumphing • Collaborating • Exploring and building • Collecting • Problem-solving or strategizing • Role playing or imagining • Surprise – surprising others and being surprised ourselves.
  17. 17. What’s Required to Learn? Relevant Practice Specific, timely feedback Ability to retrieve later Risk of Forgetting Curve!!!
  18. 18. Examples: Feedback Loops “The premise of a feedback loop is simple: Provide people with information about their actions in real time, then give them a chance to change those actions, pushing them toward better behaviors.” Wired Magazine, June 19, 2011 www.bottomlineperformance.com
  19. 19. Linking Games to Learning Learning Element Game Elements that Match Motivation Game goals or challenges, conflict, time, cooperation, reward structures (feedback, points, achievements), - all help equate to the “fun” in games. Relevant practice Game goal or challenges, rules within game, reward structures, game loops Feedback Pretty much a 1:1 here – reward structures in game supply feedback. “Game loop” also supplies feedback Retrieval later Lots of ways games help with retrieval: Context, story, desire for repeat play, emotion attached to game play.
  20. 20. Today’s agenda
  21. 21. ExactTarget (NYSE: ET) They have:  1,500 employees worldwide  250,000 users worldwide  500 + partners worldwide
  22. 22. Why ExactTarget wanted our Guru game 1. Multiple Product Lines and Multiple Product Launches • 9 distinct product lines within organization • Product line releases each month 2. Employees, clients, and partners had training overload; ET needed to find a way to “mix it up.” 3. MobileConnect was one of the largest product launches ever. Critical to educate folks. 4. ET’s Scott Thomas had played Guru; liked it. Wanted to try it.
  23. 23. What is the Knowledge Guru? A solution to a problem we’ve seen a lot with our clients.
  24. 24. What is the Knowledge Guru? A solution to a problem we’ve seen a lot with our clients.
  25. 25. What is the Knowledge Guru? A solution to a problem we’ve seen a lot with our clients.
  26. 26. What is the Knowledge Guru? A solution to a problem we’ve seen a lot with our clients.
  27. 27. We wanted… For people to be able to PLAY. For them to LEARN while they played. For clients to TRACK what people were learning (or not learning). And for players to REMEMBER, long after they played. Play Game
  28. 28. We wanted… For people to be able to PLAY. For them to LEARN while they played. For clients to TRACK what people were learning (or not learning). And for players to REMEMBER, long after they played. And…we wanted people to be able to play across multiple devices: desktop, iPad, or Android tablet via web app or native app. We wanted a solution that could work independently of an LMS…or be Tin Can compliant so it COULD work with an LMS Play Game
  29. 29. How Guru does Measurement Admin tool lets you verify what people do – and don’t get
  30. 30. How Guru does Measurement Admin tool lets you verify what people do – and don’t get
  31. 31. How Guru does Measurement Admin tool lets you verify what people do – and don’t get
  32. 32. How Guru does Measurement Admin tool lets you verify what people do – and don’t get
  33. 33. How Guru does Measurement Admin tool lets you verify what people do – and don’t get
  34. 34. Positioning the game 2. Marketed the heck out of it. 1. Reinforcement tactic rather than primary learning method.
  35. 35. Positioning the game (cont.) 3. Required in some functional units. 4. Provided managers with idea kits. 5. Drew attention to leaderboards on a regular basis.
  36. 36. What Did Folks Say… The game was great! It was a fun way to learn about MobileConnect. I enjoyed the scenario-type questions, which put it all in perspective.
  37. 37. What Did Folks Say… The game was great! It was a fun way to learn about MobileConnect. I enjoyed the scenario-type questions, which put it all in perspective. I’m a pretty competitive person, so challenging myself to get one of the top scores added a layer of fun to learning about the MobileConnect product.
  38. 38. What Did Folks Say… The game was great! It was a fun way to learn about MobileConnect. I enjoyed the scenario-type questions, which put it all in perspective. I’m a pretty competitive person, so challenging myself to get one of the top scores added a layer of fun to learning about the MobileConnect product.The repetition of the different paths helped me retain the information.
  39. 39. Business Results… Annika, Age 8
  40. 40. Business Results… Annika, Age 8
  41. 41. Business Results… Annika, Age 8
  42. 42. Today’s agenda
  43. 43. Sounds GREAT but how do I get started? Play games; evaluate what you are playing Get familiar w/ game elements & how to use them. Think about the learning – and then the game. Dump ADDIE. Go agile instead. Playtest.Playtest. Did I say playtest?
  44. 44. Play games; evaluate what you are playing
  45. 45. Play games; evaluate what you are playing
  46. 46. Get familiar with game elements & how to use them Goal Story Aesthetics Resources Time* Conflict Competition Cooperation Dynamics Levels Boundaries Outcome Rules & Procedures Reward Structures
  47. 47. Define learning need, then game concepts
  48. 48. Define learning need, then game concepts  What problem are you trying to solve?  Is it a learning problem…or caused by something else?  What does learner need to know/do to achieve game outcome?  What is current skill level of players?  What are the logistics re: when/how game will be played?  What are technical requirements/constraints? You start by asking the same questions you would ask for other learning solutions:
  49. 49. Define learning need, then game concepts  What problem are you trying to solve?  Is it a learning problem…or caused by something else?  What does learner need to know/do to achieve game outcome?  What is current skill level of players?  What are the logistics re: when/how game will be played?  What are technical requirements/constraints? You start by asking the same questions you would ask for other learning solutions:
  50. 50. Dump ADDIE; go agile instead (iterative) Playtest. Playtest. Did I say playtest?
  51. 51. Dump ADDIE; go agile instead (iterative) Playtest. Playtest. Did I say playtest?
  52. 52. Dump ADDIE; go agile instead (iterative) Playtest. Playtest. Did I say playtest?
  53. 53. Splash/title screen Phil screen – game orientation Territory or orientation ? Overview of formulations Formulations game (territory map) with 5 customer sites available. (4 sites grayed out on first entrance). Once a customer is selected from territory map…. Easy to hard, challeng e, or back to main map? Question 1: multiple choice Question 1 feedback Question 2: multiple choice Question 3: multiple choice Question 2 feedback Question 3 feedback Challenge scenario Ask customer questions Talk to Phil Review past issue Respond Within challenge scenario, learner can return to main “challenge” screen from any of the four “options” screens listed here. They will increase their customer satisfaction and sales scores the more things they check out. When they respond incorrectly, they will detract from their customer sat and sales and increase customer complaints. A correct response will increase customer sat and sales and decrease customer complaints. They cannot leave challenge until they’ve responded to customer. Learners can choose from two paths: easy to hard or straight to the challenge. In “easy to hard” path, learners receive 3 multiple-choice questions. Correct responses will improve customer sat and sales and decrease complaints. Incorrect responses will have the opposite effect. After completing “easy,” learners can return to main map or go onto the challenge scenario. At start of course, learner sees “splash” screen with course title and then is greeted by Phil, the learning agent. Phil orients learner to purpose of game and then offers choice: get overview of formulations or go straight to territory and game play. Doing orientation FIRST will improve sat and sales ratings and decrease complaints. From orientation, learner can also travel to territory.
  54. 54. Raul’s Easy Questions You answered all easy questions – return to Customer home Customer home
  55. 55. Insert challenge description here. Raul: Can I store this? Raul has questions related to storage. Your potential sales with Raul are 180,000 gilders. You can start with easy questions or try the challenge right away. Answer easy questions
  56. 56. Ask Raul questions Question 1 Question 2 Question 3 Question 4 Customer home
  57. 57. Customer home Talk to Phil
  58. 58. Customer home Review Raul’s past issue Past issue described here.
  59. 59. Respond to Raul:
  60. 60. Rough/Dirty mockups of game flow. 65
  61. 61. We hate to be the bearers of bad news, but something BAD is about to happen. 66 Game Opening. Would dissolve into opportunity to select expert cohort.
  62. 62. Before calamity strikes, please select from among these highly qualified experts to assist you. 67 Dr. Steve Music
  63. 63. 68 Newscast video Once expert cohort selected, player is taken to screen with video player. Video auto launches. AT conclusion of video, you’re “taken” directly to bunker (next slide)
  64. 64. Expert’s bunker: start here. Click Map to see all Recruitment Center locations. Bunker will be on map. Player returns to bunker between levels to exchange resources 69 Expert’s directions communicated via talk bubbles. Resource Shelf Brief Case Game map Available powerups X X X No.ofexperts Your tally Martians’ tally
  65. 65. Game Map 70Brief Case Game map Available power-ups X X X No.ofexperts Your tally Martians’ tally Recruitment Center 1 Recruitment Center 2 Recruitment Center 3 Recruitment Center 4 Recruitment Center 5 Dr. Music’s bunker
  66. 66. Level Map 71Brief Case Game map Available power-ups X X X No.ofexperts Your tally Martians’ tally Recruitment Center 1 Alien’s directions/explanatory info communicated via talk bubbles. Icon/Thumbnail for mini-game Icon/Thumbnail for mini-game Icon/Thumbnail for mini-game Icon/Thumbnail for mini-game
  67. 67. Mini Game 72Brief Case Game map Available power-ups X X X No.ofexperts Your tally Martians’ tally Back to Recruitment Center “Mini-game – earn 1, 2, or 3 stars based on performance. Expert cohort Great way to get us all killed! Check XYZ in your briefcase try again if you want anyone to survive.
  68. 68. Want More? Tell us via poll • I want more info on workshops or tools that can help me learn how to learn to design learning games. • I want more info on using Knowledge Guru to create games. • I want info on online resources that can help me learn more about game-based learning and serious games. • I’m good with what I got – nothing further for me.
  69. 69. Want more?
  70. 70. Want more?
  71. 71. Want more? August 28, 2013 – Indianapolis, IN Play games; evaluate learning /fun factors? Link games to learning; identify appropriate reward structures and best games types for various situations Master the lingo; create your own learning game. Playtest your paper prototype; revise.
  72. 72. What else can I do? I can’t go to those workshops. How else can I get help? • Call us or email us; we can do a learning game design work shop for your specific project: – (317) 861-5935; we can help you get started! – sharon@bottomlineperformance.com • Stay on our email list; we send stuff out monthly:
  73. 73. Quiz Time!
  74. 74. Q1) What 4 things are required for people to Learn? Relevant Practice Specific, timely feedback Ability to retrieve later
  75. 75. Q2) What game elements link to the learning elements? Learning Element Game Elements that Match Motivation Game goals or challenges, conflict, time, cooperation, reward structures (feedback, points, achievements), - all help equate to the “fun” in games. Relevant practice Game goal or challenges, rules within game, reward structures, game loops Feedback Pretty much a 1:1 here – reward structures in game supply feedback. “Game loop” also supplies feedback Retrieval later Lots of ways games help with retrieval: Context, story, desire for repeat play, emotion attached to game play.
  76. 76. Q3) What % of information do people forget after 3 days w/out repetition? 90%
  77. 77. Q4) I mentioned 5 steps for getting started in game design. How many can you list? Play games; evaluate what you are playing Get familiar w/ game elements & how to use them. Think about the learning – and then the game. Dump ADDIE. Go agile instead. Playtest.Playtest. Did I say playtest?
  78. 78. Final Questions for me? ?????

×