Castle Redesign RDT Presentation 022312

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Castle Redesign RDT Presentation 022312

  1. 1. Overview Future Implementation Plan Charette Process Data Sub-Team forms Charette Process Started with stories Finalize prototypes Build knowledge base RD Team formedPresentSep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul
  2. 2. Overview Future Implementation Plan Charette Process Data Sub-Team forms Charette Process Started with stories Finalize prototypes Build knowledge base RD Team formedPresentSep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul
  3. 3. Overview Future Implementation Plan Charette Process Data Sub-Team forms Charette Process Started with stories Finalize prototypes Build knowledge base RD Team formedPresentSep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul
  4. 4. Build knowledge base stories, data POVs HMWs prototypesISSUES THEMES 3 IDEAS• 9th, 10th math scores • Personalized learning • Small learning communities• Transitions • Caring relationships • Community schools• Graduation rates • School culture • Wraparound services• Low morale • Time to collaborate pipeline• General discipline • Support services• Parent, Community Engagement
  5. 5. Build knowledge base stories, data POVs HMWs componentsISSUES THEMES 5 STRANDS• 9th, 10th math scores • Personalized learning • Teaching & Learning• Transitions • Caring relationships • Organizational Design• Graduation rates • School culture • School Culture• Low morale • Time to collaborate • Partnerships• General discipline • Support services • Leadership Capacity• Parent, Community Engagement
  6. 6. Tonight: task 1 stories, data 3 ideas Which idea(s) would you choose, given the issues and strengths?ISSUES 3 IDEAS 20-30min• 9th, 10th math scores • Small learning • Groups of 6-10, fill out poster sheet communities• Transitions • 3min ‘pitch’ • Community schools• Graduation rates • Vote on winning ideas • Wraparound services• Low morale pipeline• General discipline• Parent, Community Engagement
  7. 7. Tonight: task 2With the essential idea that you chose – stories, data components What are the implications for each component?ISSUES 5 STRANDS 60min• 9th, 10th math scores • Teaching & Learning • Make sure group has diverse representation• Transitions • Organizational Design • Brainstorm on poster sheets provided• Graduation rates • School Culture• Low morale • Partnerships• General discipline • Leadership Capacity• Parent, Community Engagement
  8. 8. Next Steps Future Scrub-down Sub-Team Implementation Plan Strategies Sub-Team Charette Process Data Sub-Team forms Charette Process Started with stories Finalize prototypes Build knowledge base RD Team formedPresentSep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul
  9. 9. • Next meeting: March 22, 2012 Key Project, 5:30-8:30p• Call for working group (“sub-team”) Meet weekly between now and March 22 Analyze what was collected tonight to present possible structures for the RDT to give feedback on in March• Town Hall meeting next Wednesday at WCC
  10. 10. College/Career Academies by Demand• exposure to global experiences beyond physical geographical limitation;• career pathways are tied to student demand, tied to workforce development and leverage local community assets Industrial & Arts & Engineering Public & Human HIDOE pathways Health Services Natural Resources Communication Technology Business Services Proposed Academies* Health Science Natural Resources Arts Production Business Cyber-Security Biotechnology Environmental Sci. Media Construction Finance Information Medical Tech. Food Service Communication Engineering, Design Investigation Marine Science Transportation Community Partners CDC, UH, PTSD Kako’o ‘O’iwi, Servco/Nissan Referentia with VA/DoD, Paepae o He’eia, PRP Welding Patriot Program Tripler, Kaiser, Papahana Kuaola Honda Windward COE Kualoa Ranch Carpenter’s Union HIMB, PVS, IBEW, BIA, CECH HPU/JHU summer C&C Honolulu PVS, Ahupua’a Pacific Resource Geochemical Proj Partnership Oceanic Institute DT Hawaii/APEC Marine Base HI Conditions Continual method of feedback and evaluation between community and school to ensure academies reflect student-interests; partnership with community is appropriately rigorous and engages students Facilitation of community partners through someone on-staff at the school to manage coordination and orientation, etc Competencies Teacher as facilitator (guide on the side vs sage on the stage) Academy teacher teams including real-time student tracking system within and among teacher-terms Social media and technology in the classroom Relationship-building with community to build curriculum and instruction that is rigorous and relevant to young people Curriculum Core subjects are online when students cannot access career pathway choices Internships, Apprenticeships, Senior Projects, Electives are integrated both on- and off-campus Strategic leveraging of community assets (Native Hawaiian knowledge) integrated in academies Enrichment/supplemental learning geared to college- and career-ready relevant experiences (campus visits, field trips) STEM and communication courses include STEM Week, SSEF, Science Olympiad, Math/Science Bowls, Robotics, DT Field trips (physical and virtual), APEC team experiences, mentorships (physical and virtual), alumni network
  11. 11. Community Schools• Schools act as community hubs, and provide programs and services (enrichment programs; focused instruction/tutoring; wraparound services) on- site/nearby via strategic community partnerships that are managed through an intermediary entity• Integrated focus on academics, health and social services, youth and community development, and community engagement to improve student learning, and build stronger families and healthier communities wraparound services student enrichment activities Intermediary Organization Intermediary links teacher student needs to focused instruction programs and services administrator Community partners engage to provide Schools/complexes identify what students students with programs and services need to drive community engagement Key Roles Oversight, resource and policy Manage the network, strategic Implementation, practice knowledge, development planning, communication policy feedback Community Partners Same community partners to address wraparound services (health/behavioral/social needs), focused instruction, enrichment opportunities, and career pathway-relevant experiences Conditions Shares common vision w/schools Politically neutral; works very Community programs and services Tracks common outcomes closely with principals are integral to student learning Competencies Capacity to serve all youth in CA; Relationship-building, facilitation Teacher as facilitator; collaborative data sharing and reporting leadership, technology in classroom Curriculum Core subjects are online when students cannot access career pathway choices Internships, Apprenticeships, Senior Projects, Electives are integrated both on- and off-campus Strategic leveraging of community assets (Native Hawaiian knowledge) integrated in academies Hands-on training as community service; WCC writing and math teachers help with remediation STEM and communication courses include STEM Week, SSEF, Science Olympiad, Math/Science Bowls, Robotics, DT
  12. 12. The Pipeline• Wraparound services are site-based at the schools and coordinated along a pipeline between Elementary, Intermediate and High schools• Mix of academic, health and college-/career- preparatory programs and services address other factors that affect student learning enrichment teacher administrator financial aid and focused planning office instruction teacher wraparound health/dental services svs focused instruction student-run store police intro to colleges and careers focused counselors administrator teacher administrator instruction Elementary School Intermediate School High School Key Roles Pediatric medical/health care; pre-K College-/career- intro and planning HS houses resources to draw in entire readiness classes, alongside existing services; anti-bullying, anti-drug services families; maintain database on youth programs and services alongside existing programs/services re: motivation, barriers, BPs, alumni Community HPD/HFD, ROTC, USMA and USNA Alumni Associations, Hawaii National Guard, YMCA Partners Community partnerships concentrated around wraparound services and focused instruction opportunities Conditions Programs and services are offered both within and out of the school day; provided on-site/nearby to mitigate absences in the classroom which impact student learning; some services may be accessible during certain times to entire community Competencies School staff are aware of ancillary services and readily draw upon them as needed for their students; communication with families and community to bring awareness of what is being offered on school sites; coordination of facility usage Academy teacher teams including real-time student tracking system within and among teacher-terms Curriculum Ethics course incorporating lua, ho’oponopono, community partners and retired detectives (drug prevention) Attention to transition points between schools with regular communication among teachers with regards to whole student (academic, social, emotional, behavioral, physical health) Servant Leader Program with service projects addressing 96744 needs
  13. 13. Working Position Statement: What does a successful Castle High School graduate look like? hypotheses (POVs) how might we… strands components Students need: Recreate and renew the value • A personal connection with a caring adult as that CURRICULUM: rigorous, aligned, integrated of a 96744 education at King sustains their efforts to meet high expectations • All students are engaged in a and Castle, and ensure every • To experience real-world problem-solving because rigorous, interdisciplinary, standards-based student has a caring adult much of what traditional curriculum offers is core academic curriculum that integrates mentor? perceived as irrelevant by students character education and place- • Their basic needs met so they can focus on Expose ALL students to real based, project-based learning education and be able to dream bigger world problem-solving • Students have opportunities for leadership • A way to understand and experience learning the community partners and and service in the school and community way they learn best as that will engage them and consistently manage the Teaching & help them to know success in school, feel safe to relationships/logistics/ INSTRUCTION: relevant, personalized Learning ask questions, maintain educational momentum coordination? • Curriculum is connected to real-world • To feel pride and ownership in and for their context, with authentic and cultural Learning is school, themselves and community Fund wraparound services learning experiences, that build on student rigorous, relevan • To feel safe from bullying, drugs, while they are at that could be provided on interests, needs, and community resources t, aligned, authe school campus, with coordinators to • Instruction addresses students’ ntic, place-based help parents navigate when interests, learning styles, aptitudes, and Teachers need: and project- overburdened? choices – and motivates and challenges all • Strong communication systems to engage parents based, and build students in every classroom and families consistently future • Mentoring, especially if they are new, to be Make the system flexible so community ASSESSMENT teachers can change leaders; prepared for challenges training doesn’t cover • Structure/programs are in place to ensure • PD that is individualized, linked to school methods, act as Teaching is students graduate on time/take advantage goals, addresses teaching and learning, and facilitators, have time for each personalized, ind of accelerated learning opportunities child? ividualized, and addresses developmental characteristics of • All staff use formative and summative students motivates and assessments to improve curriculum and • Caring, meaningful relationships with students challenges all Give students and parents a instruction, school culture, organization • Time to collaborate and space to breathe so they students in every view of their strengths and and management classroom can focus on educating students learning styles, create a safe • The school uses a systematic, data-driven environment, and start early school improvement planning process Parents need: and start strong • Strong communication systems (both to and from) TECHNOLOGY to stay on top of their child’s learning Give students and parents a • Curriculum incorporates digital tools to • Awareness of, easy access to, and support for, view of their best possible access, organize and communicate programs and services that address academic, future, w/direct experience to learning and knowledge social, and emotional aspects of student learning real-world work and help • On-line literacy for teachers and students • To build meaningful relationships with the school them retain what they have are integrated into learning and people in it, to build pride and ownership learned
  14. 14. Working Position Statement: What does a successful Castle High School graduate look like? hypotheses (POVs) how might we… strands components Students need: RELATIONSHIPS Recreate and renew the value • A personal connection with a caring adult as that • Structures, behaviors, and activities are in of a 96744 education at King sustains their efforts to meet high expectations place to connect all students to adults and Castle, and ensure every • To experience real-world problem-solving because within the school and within community student has a caring adult much of what traditional curriculum offers is • All students receive support and mentor? perceived as irrelevant by students preparation for post-secondary learning • Their basic needs met so they can focus on Expose ALL students to real education and be able to dream bigger world problem-solving TIME & SPACE • A way to understand and experience learning the community partners and • Instructional time is strategically and way they learn best as that will engage them and consistently manage the Organizational flexibly organized around student learning help them to know success in school, feel safe to relationships/logistics/ Design needs, and time is built into the schedule ask questions, maintain educational momentum coordination? to provide additional help as needed • To feel pride and ownership in and for their Structures are • Classrooms and other rooms are utilized in school, themselves and community Fund wraparound services flexible, promote nontraditional and innovative ways • To feel safe from bullying, drugs, while they are at that could be provided on collaboration • School facilities are used by students and school campus, with coordinators to and pay community beyond normal school hours help parents navigate when attention to the • Developmentally appropriate school day Teachers need: overburdened? major transitions • Strong communication systems to engage parents points; and PROFESSIONAL LEARNING & PLANNING and families consistently accommodate • Professional development is • Mentoring, especially if they are new, to be Make the system flexible so teaching and individualized, aligned with school prepared for challenges training doesn’t cover teachers can change learning goals, increases content knowledge, uses • PD that is individualized, linked to school methods, act as strategies that timely data to improve instructional skills goals, addresses teaching and learning, and facilitators, have time for each are consistent and assessment, and raises understanding addresses developmental characteristics of child? with ways of developmental characteristics of students students in students • Caring, meaningful relationships with students Give students and parents a various stages of • Time to collaborate and space to breathe so they view of their strengths and development COMPREHENSIVE STUDENT SUPPORTS can focus on educating students learning styles, create a safe learn • Intervention approaches for students Parents need: environment, and start early beyond special education for those • Strong communication systems (both to and from) and start strong struggling academically to stay on top of their child’s learning • Awareness of, easy access to, and support Give students and parents a TRANSITIONS for, programs and services that address view of their best possible • Coordinated strategies and supports academic, social, and emotional aspects of student future, w/direct experience to facilitate successful transitions between learning real-world work and help elementary, middle, high schools & beyond • To build meaningful relationships with the school them retain what they have • Curriculum is aligned both horizontally and people in it, to build pride and ownership learned (complex-wide) and vertically (K-12)
  15. 15. Working Position Statement: What does a successful Castle High School graduate look like? hypotheses (POVs) how might we… strands components Students need: Recreate and renew the value • A personal connection with a caring adult as that of a 96744 education at King sustains their efforts to meet high expectations and Castle, and ensure every • To experience real-world problem-solving because student has a caring adult LEARNING ENVIRONMENT much of what traditional curriculum offers is mentor? • Culture fosters high expectations and perceived as irrelevant by students aspirations • Their basic needs met so they can focus on Expose ALL students to real • Culture is characterized by energy, education and be able to dream bigger world problem-solving enthusiasm, collaboration, respect, • A way to understand and experience learning the community partners and responsibility and trust way they learn best as that will engage them and consistently manage the • Students are engaged in their schoolwork help them to know success in school, feel safe to relationships/logistics/ and in the social life of the school and ask questions, maintain educational momentum coordination? School Culture community • To feel pride and ownership in and for their school, • School is a place where students, parents, themselves and community Fund wraparound services Environment and educators are encouraged to take risks • To feel safe from bullying, drugs, while they are at that could be provided on fosters high and speak up school campus, with coordinators to expectations and • Educators have collegial (vs congenial) help parents navigate when lifelong love of relationships with one another overburdened? learning among Teachers need: • Students and teachers feel safe in their • Strong communication systems to engage parents all stakeholders school as well as their community and families consistently of the school Make the system flexible so • Mentoring, especially if they are new, to be community, and teachers can change DATA-BASED INQUIRY/DECISION-MAKING has structures in prepared for challenges training doesn’t cover methods, act as • Procedures to collect and act on student • PD that is individualized, linked to school goals, place for facilitators, have time for each data are inclusive and public continual addresses teaching and learning, and addresses child? • All members of the school community – developmental characteristics of students evaluation and students, teachers, parents, • Caring, meaningful relationships with students data-driven administrators, etc – share responsibility • Time to collaborate and space to breathe so they Give students and parents a decision making for tracking outcomes and enhancing can focus on educating students view of their strengths and student learning learning styles, create a safe • Staff incorporates regular professional environment, and start early Parents need: learning and planning with data-driven and start strong • Strong communication systems (both to and from) decision-making to stay on top of their child’s learning • Staff assess and report the impact of Give students and parents a • Awareness of, easy access to, and support for, view of their best possible improvement policies and practices on all programs and services that address academic, student populations to stakeholders future, w/direct experience to social, and emotional aspects of student learning real-world work and help • To build meaningful relationships with the school them retain what they have and people in it, to build pride and ownership learned
  16. 16. Working Position Statement: What does a successful Castle High School graduate look like? hypotheses (POVs) how might we… strands components Students need: Recreate and renew the value • A personal connection with a caring adult as that PARENT & FAMILY INVOLVEMENT of a 96744 education at King sustains their efforts to meet high expectations • Parents, teachers and students meet and Castle, and ensure every • To experience real-world problem-solving because regularly to develop personal learning student has a caring adult much of what traditional curriculum offers is plans and discuss academic, future goals mentor? perceived as irrelevant by students • Parents are involved in school’s decision- • Their basic needs met so they can focus on Expose ALL students to real making process education and be able to dream bigger world problem-solving • Staff has made efforts to engage • A way to understand and experience learning the community partners and Partnerships uninvolved or hard-to-reach parents way they learn best as that will engage them and consistently manage the • School uses a variety of media and help them to know success in school, feel safe to relationships/logistics/ Multiple resources to disseminate information ask questions, maintain educational momentum coordination? pathways to about academic, social, co-curricular • To feel pride and ownership in and for their school, post-secondary programs, and to solicit feedback from themselves and community Fund wraparound services training or family and community members • To feel safe from bullying, drugs, while they are at that could be provided on college • Students are informed about local issues school campus, with coordinators to accommodate and actively involved in community issues help parents navigate when the need for • Structures are in place to help teachers Teachers need: overburdened? individualized and parents community communicate with • Strong communication systems to engage parents learning, while each other effectively and families consistently incorporating • Mentoring, especially if they are new, to be Make the system flexible so community COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT prepared for challenges training doesn’t cover teachers can change partners to • Partnerships that create opportunities for • PD that is individualized, linked to school methods, act as facilitators, enhance students to pursue work-based learning goals, addresses teaching and learning, and have time for each child? instruction, provi and internships exist between the school addresses developmental characteristics of de enrichment and area businesses/community students and perform • Wraparound services are available for • Caring, meaningful relationships with students Give students and parents a wraparound students and families • Time to collaborate and space to breathe so they view of their strengths and services for can focus on educating students learning styles, create a safe students and EARLY COLLEGE Parents need: environment, and start early families • Partnerships between school and post- • Strong communication systems (both to and from) and start strong secondary institutions provide a variety of to stay on top of their child’s learning options for postsecondary education • Awareness of, easy access to, and support Give students and parents a • Post-secondary access programs are for, programs and services that address view of their best possible available for all students academic, social, and emotional aspects of student future, w/direct experience to • Students are actively involved in early and learning real-world work and help ongoing academic career guidance and • To build meaningful relationships with the school them retain what they have planning and people in it, to build pride and ownership learned
  17. 17. Working Position Statement: What does a successful Castle High School graduate look like? hypotheses (POVs) how might we… strands components Students need: Recreate and renew the value • A personal connection with a caring adult as that of a 96744 education at King GOVERNANCE sustains their efforts to meet high expectations and Castle, and ensure every • Major decisions are aligned with school’s • To experience real-world problem-solving because student has a caring adult mission statement, vision and goals much of what traditional curriculum offers is mentor? • All voices including students, are honored perceived as irrelevant by students and includes a diverse, representative • Their basic needs met so they can focus on Expose ALL students to real selection of stakeholders education and be able to dream bigger world problem-solving • All constituents are knowledgeable about • A way to understand and experience learning the community partners and and participate in school’s decision-making way they learn best as that will engage them and consistently manage the help them to know success in school, feel safe to relationships/logistics/ COLLABORATIVE LEADERSHIP ask questions, maintain educational momentum coordination? • Teacher leaders and principals foster • To feel pride and ownership in and for their Leadership culture of collective and collaborative school, themselves and community Fund wraparound services Capacity responsibility for student success among • To feel safe from bullying, drugs, while they are at that could be provided on all staff of the school community school campus, with coordinators to Leadership • Students are actively involved in decisions help parents navigate when development of Teachers need: about their academic development; and overburdened? teachers and • Strong communication systems to engage parents take responsibility for their learning principals and families consistently increase ability • Mentoring, especially if they are new, to be Make the system flexible so PRINCIPAL LEADERSHIP to navigate prepared for challenges training doesn’t cover teachers can change • Is reflective, proactive and well-informed change, improve • PD that is individualized, linked to school methods, act as about proven best practices instruction, and goals, addresses teaching and learning, and facilitators, have time for each • Supports leadership development and accommodate addresses developmental characteristics of child? encourages leadership potential of others the different students • Principal is familiar with individual learning styles • Caring, meaningful relationships with students students, their families and the community Give students and parents a • Time to collaborate and space to breathe so they view of their strengths and can focus on educating students MORAL COURAGE learning styles, create a safe • Principal, CAS, teacher-leaders have skills Parents need: environment, and start early to handle conflicts and defend equitable • Strong communication systems (both to and from) and start strong practices that support learning of students to stay on top of their child’s learning • Leaders routinely involve broader school • Awareness of, easy access to, and support Give students and parents a community in public discourse, process for, programs and services that address view of their best possible concerns openly, and move the collective academic, social, and emotional aspects of student future, w/direct experience to dialogue beyond individual and personal learning real-world work and help interests • To build meaningful relationships with the school them retain what they have and people in it, to build pride and ownership learned
  18. 18. Summary of DataCategory Areas of Strength Areas of GrowthTeaching & Learning • Gains have been made in reading comprehension in the • Students are not achieving in 9th and 10th grades in mathCurriculum general population and in subgroups of disabled and • Graduation rate is falling faster than the 9th retention rateInstruction disadvantaged students • System to measure whether alternative programs areAssessment • Curriculum alignment to standards completed by all core helping, and level of extracurricular activity involvementTechnology departments • Credit recovery classes offered for 10th – 12th graders, offer • Options available for repeating/accelerating classes more subjects for credit recovery • Leadership training in student government, clubs, PEP • Follow curriculum maps/pacing guides by ALL core teachers • Curriculum alignment to standards for electivesOrganizational Design • Café tutorial • Student supports needed for growing population ofRelationships • English and Math workshops for 9th – 10th graders economically disadvantaged populationTime & Space • Title 1 funding provides new resources for tutoring • Increase the number of Title 1 students participating inProfessional learning • Castle has large number of extra/co-curricular activities support servicesStudent supports sports teams (44) and clubs (15) • More articulation with feeder schools neededTransitions • Provides 2nd, 3rd, 4th chances to students and adults • Curriculum alignment needed horizontally and vertically • Transition class for 9th graders to support success • Transition from Castle to WCC shows a high amount of remediation needed • 9th retention rate indicates transition to Castle from King • Increase awareness of stakeholders of CSSS servicesSchool Culture • Tremendous pride among alumni community • General Discipline is an issueLearning environment • Low morale on part of teachers and studentsData-based Inquiry • Safety, cleanliness and order on campus must increase • Increase student and teacher recognition in communityPartnerships • Wealth of resources offered through CCRC • While many modes of communication exist, parentParent, Family Engagement • School-wide system in place to inform parents and engagement remains an area of opportunityCommunity Engagement community about students (Knightly Newsletter, Interim • Parent and student accountability (everything falls on theEarly College report, mygradebook, test results, Trend report) teacher)Leadership Capacity • Traditional governance structures are changing as a • Teachers need more time to collaborateGovernance result of the restructuring Castle is undergoing • Teacher-led PLCs can be utilized betterCollaborative Leadership • Teachers are coaches and class advisors • No mentoring program for new teachersPrincipal Leadership • Communication and collaboration among teachers – withinMoral Courage departments, across departments, across schools • Training and support for co-teacher teams
  19. 19. Definition of Terms• Redesign Team (RDT): a group, comprised of the community, who meet monthly in regards to this Redesign initiative• Point of View Statements: these are statements made by the RDT, based on qualitative data (largely student stories). They are written from the perspective of the student, the teacher and the parent. They can also be thought of as hypotheses to help frame the issues.• How Might We Statements: after coming up with some hypotheses around what stakeholders need, the RDT came up with some questions that would help us identify what the final product needs to address• Prototypes: In November, the RDT came up with possible models of what a Redesigned high school could be. There were 6-8 created; the project team then analyzed the prototypes for common themes and extracted 3 major ideas• Small learning community: an interdisciplinary team of teachers shares a few hundred or fewer students in common for instruction, assumes responsibility for their educational progress across years of school, and exercises maximum flexibility to act on knowledge of students’ needs• Community School: a school that acts as a community hub, often opening earlier and staying open later to accommodate families; community partnerships provide focused instruction, enrichment opportunities and/ or wraparound services that are facilitated by an intermediary entity who works very closely with principals to ensure the partnerships are strategic, appropriate to students’ needs, and of quality to positively impact student learning• Wraparound Pipeline: a coordinated set of wraparound services that are spread across the continuum of K-12 (ideally P-16), that address student physical, behavioral, and/or emotional issues that can impact student learning

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