Story maps and personas an intro

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A brief overview of the concept of personas, storymaps and answering a key question of when can I get my Minimum Viable Product

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  • Do some of your team results look like this? Do you find that sometimes teams implode due to “unexplainable” circumstances? This is a photo from the results of a hurricane that struck Galveston, TX in 1900. In these days, hurricanes were equally unexplainable. You could only clean up the damage afterwards.
  • One method is bucketed relative sizing. The team take the first story card (this method works best with backlog items written on sticky-notes or index cards) and puts it down. Then, the first person takes the next card and can place it below, to the left if smaller, or to the right if bigger. The second person can either move that card—generating a conversation—or place the next card. Moves continue around the table or group...
  • One method is bucketed relative sizing. The team take the first story card (this method works best with backlog items written on sticky-notes or index cards) and puts it down. Then, the first person takes the next card and can place it below, to the left if smaller, or to the right if bigger. The second person can either move that card—generating a conversation—or place the next card. Moves continue around the table or group...
  • Until all the cards are sorted into buckets. Now the team assigns numbers to the buckets, using our Fibonacci sequence. These become the points.

    My Rally Coach colleague Aaron Sanders tells the story of a team who was in a dire strait. They needed to quickly create and size an entire release backlog of what became 200 stories. They used this sizing method to quickly get to good enough sizes. The resulting release plan served them well.
  • Story maps and personas an intro

    1. 1. Mapping your Minimal Viable Product through StoryMaps Mark Kilby July 22, 2014 Agile Orlando & Lean Startup Practitioners of Central Florida
    2. 2. Mark Kilby Agile Coach Mark@markkilby.com @mkilby– twitter http://markkilby.com Linkedin.com/in/mkilby AgileOrlando.com (founder) Lean Coffee Orlando (founder) speaker Software since 1990; Coaching since 2003
    3. 3. 3 QUESTIONS FOR YOU… #1 HOW MANY ARE INVOLVED IN A STARTUP TODAY? (OR AN AGILE PROJECT)?
    4. 4. 3 QUESTIONS FOR YOU… #2 HOW MANY OF YOU HAVE IDENTIFIED YOUR KEY USERS?
    5. 5. Does your product look like this to potential customers?
    6. 6. How do we determine what is the absolute minimum to build so we can release the product and generate revenue?
    7. 7. Our Goal • Deep Dive – Personas and Storymaps • As time permits: – Sizing Storymaps to answer “when” – Real Options: another way to prioritize
    8. 8. Story Mapping • An approach to organize and prioritize user stories (?) • A tool to help in defining a roadmap • A way to define your Minimum Viable Product (MVP) (?) for the next release
    9. 9. How does story mapping help? • Provides visibility of the workflow across the system • Shows how different users/roles will be served • Points out relationships between stories • Helps to spotlight missing stories • Provides a prioritization mechanism • Release planning is improved by focusing on valuable slices
    10. 10. Story Mapping - Preparation • Understand the users/roles using the system • The major activities performed by the users of the system • Arrange activities in the order they are performed • Define stories required to complete activities
    11. 11. Understand Users and Roles As a user, I want XYZ so that I can (get some value) Goal 1 Goal 2 Goal 3 Epic – big user story Role: Admin
    12. 12. Understand Users and Roles As a user, I want XYZ so that I can (get some value) Goal 1 Goal 2 Goal 3 Epic – big user story Role: Admin VAGUE Somewha t better
    13. 13. Pragmatic Personas Personas – fictional character representing the market segment we want to address Helps us empathize with our users Even better …
    14. 14. Why should I care? EMPATHY From http://copywritercollective.com/howtobeacopywriter/abcs-of-copywriting-empathy/
    15. 15. EXAMPLE?
    16. 16. Story Mapping - Preparation • Understand the users/roles using the system • The major activities performed by the users of the system • Arrange activities in the order they are performed • Define stories required to complete activities Back to …
    17. 17. Story Maps visualize the scope Activity 1 User’s Sequence in Time Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story Functional activities the user performs, while using the product Capabilities needed in the product, so the user can perform the activities • Story Maps organize product capabilities by user activity • Story Maps communicate the “big picture” to delivery teams Courtesy of LeadingAgile.com
    18. 18. Story Maps visualize the scope Activity 1 User’s Sequence in Time Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story WHAT YOUR USERS NEED (not what they ask for) ELEMENTS YOUR TEAM CAN BUILD • Story Maps organize product capabilities by user activity • Story Maps communicate the “big picture” to delivery teams
    19. 19. EXAMPLE?
    20. 20. Story Maps work with roles/personas Activity 1 User’s Sequence in Time Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story • Walk each persona through the user sequence • Discover gaps in the user stories & how they support the user activities Guest Reg. User Power User Courtesy of LeadingAgile.com
    21. 21. Minimum Marketable Feature (MMF) Activity 1 User’s Sequence in Time Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User StoryUser Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story These two stories represent the MMF for Activity 1. The others would be nice, but this is the minimum. MMF a Adapted from LeadingAgile.com
    22. 22. Minimum Viable Product (MVP) Activity 1 User’s Sequence in Time Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User StoryUser Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story The MVP might consist of these two MMFs, which are needed for the product to be “just barely sufficient” MMF a MMF b Adapted from LeadingAgile.com
    23. 23. Minimum Viable Product (MVP) Activity 1 User’s Sequence in Time Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User StoryUser Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story The MVP (with these two MMFs) will address some of the needs of Guest and Reg. User and a little of Power User -> “just barely sufficient”? Will they buy it? MMF a MMF b Guest Reg. User Power User
    24. 24. AND THEN YOUR STAKEHOLDERS ASK … WHEN CAN WE HAVE IT?
    25. 25. THEN YOU ASK YOUR TEAM… WHEN CAN WE HAVE IT?
    26. 26. Story Map Example Goals or Product Areas Specific Actions Higher Priority User Stories (next release) Lower Priority User Stories (future releases) Courtesy of LeadingAgile.com
    27. 27. From http://winnipegagilist.blogspot.com/2012/03/how-to-create-user-story-map.html
    28. 28. Team Estimation Game (aka “Bucketing”) • Create a “deck of cards” from your user stories • Have the team pick a “simple story” first (more later) Created by: Steve Bockman
    29. 29. S L Bucketed Relative Sizing
    30. 30. S L Bucketed Relative Sizing
    31. 31. Team Estimation Game (aka “Bucketing”) • Create a “deck of cards” from your user stories • Have the team pick a “simple story” first • (taking turns) Pick next card and place it relative to the first based on size/complexity. Explain. • For each move thereafter, – Pick the next card and place it, – Move a card that’s already been placed, or – Pass. – Explain your move (1-2 sentences) and let the team discuss. • Continue until there are no more moves to be made. • Collect into stacks if not already stacked. • Assign points (sizes/estimates) to each stack. Created by: Steve Bockman
    32. 32. S L Bucketed Relative Sizing 1 3 5 8 13
    33. 33. Minimum Viable Product (MVP) Activity 1 User’s Sequence in Time Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User StoryUser Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story If our team does can complete “10 points” of work every 2 weeks, when can we be done with the MVP? MMF a MMF b Adapted from LeadingAgile.com
    34. 34. Minimum Viable Product (MVP) Activity 1 User’s Sequence in Time Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User StoryUser Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story User Story If our team does can complete “10 points” of work every 2 weeks, when can we be done with the MVP? -> (18+16)/10 ~ 4 iterations or 2 months MMF a MMF b
    35. 35. Summary: Preparing Story Maps 1. Gather 3-5 people who understand purpose of the product (should include product marketing, product management, engineering and any key subject matter experts) 2. Brainstorm the user tasks (1 task per sticky note) 3. Group similar tasks together & label each group (these are “user activities”) 4. Arrange groups/activities left-to-right in order users would go through system 5. Walk the map to see what’s missing. Can either walk real users through the map or “walk a persona/role” through using a user scenario/journey 6. Generate user stories under the tasks 7. Move stories up and down in map. Highest priority go near top
    36. 36. Summary: Using Story Maps to plan WHEN your MVP can ship 1. Draw lines through your map showing “releases” of MMFs and MVPs (Optional: show which roles/personas will be served) 2. With key engineers, size stories in next release to get a sense of risk or where slicing may be needed 3. Determine velocity of development team 4. Optional: Use Real Options to determine what might need to be pushed to next release or brought in earlier
    37. 37. What are Real Options? (briefly) • 3 Concepts: – Options have Value – Options expire – Never commit early unless you know why (commit at “last responsible moment”) • How do you measure the Last Responsible Moment (LRM)? – LRM reached when 0 = Cost of Delay – Benefit of Delay
    38. 38. For more info (Personas) • Jeff Patton - http://www.stickyminds.com/article/pragmatic-personas • Roman Pichler’ Template - http://www.romanpichler.com/blog/persona- template-for-agile-product-management/ • UX perspective on Personas: http://searchenginewatch.com/article/2064754/Roles-vs.-Personas-vs.- Cognitive-Styles • David Hussman’s videos on Pragmatic Personas (1hr) – https://vimeo.com/70214000
    39. 39. For more info (Storymaps) • Jeff Patton’s original writings on storymaps (2009-2010) • Jeff Patton’s upcoming book on Storymapping • David Hussman’s videos on Storymaps • Storymapping session at Agile Open Florida (June 27, 2014) • http://winnipegagilist.blogspot.com/2012/03/how-to-create-user-story- map.html • http://www.cio.com/article/750968/How_Story_Mapping_Complements_Agil e_Development?page=1&taxonomyId=3040 • http://blog.caplin.com/2012/02/07/issues-with-story-maps-story-maps-part- 2/
    40. 40. For more info (Real Options & Planning Game) • Real Options – http://www.leadingagile.com/2008/07/understanding-real-options/ – http://availagility.co.uk/2010/04/06/defining-the-last-responsible-moment/ • Team Estimation Game – http://www.agilelearninglabs.com/2012/05/how-to-play-the-team-estimation-game/
    41. 41. Mark Kilby Agile Coach Mark@markkilby.com @mkilby– twitter Linkedin.com/in/mkilby http://markkilby.com http://about.me/mckilby Learn more at AgileOrlando.com THANKS! Questions? Monthly evening talks (just like this) Morning Lean Coffee Q&A bi- weekly to dive deeper on topics you want to learn.

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